samrusso716
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Greek Gyros

Gyros take me to a place I've never been! Biting into one makes me feel like I should be somewhere in the Mediterranean~ Sigh, if only. This recipe has an extensive ingredient list, but the taste and final product is nothing to complain about - it'll all be worth it :D Ingredients: Gyros: - 4 cloves garlic, minced or grated - 1 onion, thinly sliced - 1 - (2-3) pound boneless pork shoulder roast - 2 tablespoons dried oregano - 2 teaspoons dried dill - 2 teaspoons paprika - 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper - 1/4 - 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon pepper - 2 lemons, juiced - 1/3 cup olive oil - 3 teaspoons red wine vinegar - 3 tablespoons greek yogurt - 4-8 homemade or store bought pitas - 1/2 cup fresh cherry tomatoes, halved, for serving - 1 red onion, thinly sliced, for serving - 4 ounces crumbled feta cheese, for serving Tzatziki: - 1 cup plain greek yogurt - 1/4 hothouse cucumber, peeled and seeded and diced small - 1 large clove garlic, grated (or finely minced) - 1/2 tablespoon white wine vinegar - 1/2 teaspoon, dried dill - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1 tablespoon fresh lemon, juiced - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil Tapenade: - 1/4 cup pitted kalamata olives - 1/4 cup pitted green olives - 1 clove garlic, grated - 1 pepperoni, diced Directions: 1) Spray a crockpot with cooking spray. Add the onions and garlic. 2) In a small bowl combine the oregano, dill, paprika, cayenne, crushed red pepper, salt and pepper. Sprinkle the pork with half of the spice mixture. 3) Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add a drizzle of olive oil. Once hot, add the pork and sear on all sides until golden brown. 4) Add pork to the prepared crockpot and sprinkle with the remaining seasonings and any drippings from the pan. To the crockpot add the 1/3 cup olive oil, lemon juice, red wine vinegar, greek yogurt and 3/4 cup of water. Cover and cook on low, 8 hours. or high for 4-6 hours. If possible check the pork a few times during cooking. If needed add some water to keep the meat moist. 5) To prepare the tzatziki pour any liquid off the surface of the greek yogurt. (I find it is best to use full fat greek yogurt for this, but 2% works ok as well. You want the yogurt to be thick, so if your greek yogurt seems thin strain it through a fine mesh strainer). Mix together the greek yogurt, diced cucumber, garlic, white wine vinegar, dill, oregano, salt and pepper to taste, and lemon juice. Drizzle with olive oil. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before serving to allow the flavors to meld. **If making the tapenade, dice the olives and mix in a small bowl with the garlic, pepperoncini and parsley. Set aside in the fridge until read to serve. 6) After 8 hours (or 4-6 on high) remove the pork and set aside to cool slightly. Once cool enough to touch shred the pork with two forks, it should fall apart easily. Return the pork to the crockpot and toss with the onions. Crank the heat to high. Allow the pork to get warm for five minutes. 7) Heat pitas. Top with chicken, tzatziki sauce, sliced tomatoes, red onion, feta cheese and tapenade if using. 8) Enjoy!
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@gabyrich please do! always eager to learn more and :D
@gabyrich its worth the try! especially with less preservatives and msg, you will feel better about eating it as well :D
I LOVE gyros! There's a great whole-in-the-wall place near my home in San Francisco that makes the best gyros I've ever had--now I'm hungry
@samrusso716 will do :)
@samrusso716 you're probably right, haha. Will let you know what happens!
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