Cards you may also be interested in
Should You Get Laser Hair Removal - Pros And Cons
The truth is that when it comes to removing body hair, you have options, and you should weigh them all before making a decision. You can quickly shave everything away, but hair grows back in a matter of days. Depilatory creams dissolve hair in seconds, but they smell like a wet dog mixed with gasoline. If you want to remove hair more thoroughly, you could try waxing or sugaring, which snatches the hair at the root. Hair doesn't grow back for weeks, but waxing is a painful procedure that causes itching when the hair grows back. There are more long-term options, such as electrolysis. Electrolysis involves inserting a super-fine needle into each hair follicle to deliver an electric current that kills the hair follicle. If you think it sounds painful, you'd be correct, and a session can be time-consuming. That brings us to laser hair removal, a popular semi-permanent hair removal method that damages the hair follicle in order to reduce hair growth. The laser detects hair solely by focusing on pigment cells found in the hair follicle. The laser burns all the way down the hair follicle and root once the melanin in the hair is targeted. You can throw away your razor and cancel your waxing appointments after a few sessions. But, before you book your first session, we've broken down the benefits and drawbacks of laser hair removal. Let's look at the benefits and drawbacks of laser hair removal. What are the advantages? While laser hair removal does not permanently remove hair, it does significantly reduce hair growth to the point where you can stop shaving. It can be done anywhere on the body, and the machine can cover large areas quickly. The legs, the back, the underarms, the bikini line, the stomach, the face... There are no restrictions on where you can get laser hair removal. In terms of pain, laser hair removal is somewhere between shaving (painless) and waxing (holy hell that hurts). It also becomes less painful as the treatments progress and the hair becomes finer. What are the disadvantages? It's a lengthy procedure. A laser hair removal session on the underarms takes less than a minute. However, it takes several sessions to see real results, ranging from three to eight depending on the size of the area, and you must usually wait four weeks between treatments. It is pricey. If you add up how much you've spent on razors and bikini wax sessions over the course of your life, the $200-$400 per session of laser hair removal may be worth it. Consider laser hair removal to be a beauty investment. Laser hair removal works best on fair skin with dark hair and worse on darker skin because the contrast between the colour of the skin and the colour of the pigment in the hair follicle allows the laser to easily pick out what to target. In patients with darker skin tones, the pigment-rich skin competes for the laser's attention with the hair follicle. This isn't to say that it isn't a possibility for people with darker skin, but you'll want to make sure the facility you visit is properly equipped. On all skin types, certain lasers, such as the Nd:YAG, are better at distinguishing between hair and skin. Laser hair removal may result in burns or scars on the skin if performed by an untrained technician. Regrettably, licencing procedures differ from state to state, and in some cases, there are no requirements at all. Be wary of "laser centres," and make sure to ask where your laser technician received his or her certification to perform the procedure. Even a dermatologist who wishes to provide laser hair removal treatments must undergo additional training. Because laser treatment is not taught in medical school, physicians who perform laser treatments must also be trained and certified.
How to make beeswax candles?
10 Steps to Make Beeswax Candles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8z7rkM2qQZU&ab_channel=JewelryCandles Beeswax candles are made with natural ingredients, and they can be a great choice for those that are trying to minimize their impact on the environment. Here are 10 steps to make your beeswax candles at home! Step one: gather your supplies. You will need the following items to make beeswax candles at home: - wax - wick that is appropriate for how big of a candle you want to create (you can find these online or in craft stores) - metal containers with lids, such as an old tin canister or even mason jar lids work well! Make sure the bowl fits your desired size and shape of the candle - this will be used to melt down the wax into liquid form. The bowl should also fit inside another larger bowl filled halfway up with water so it acts like a double boiler system when melting down the wax. If using glass jars, use oven mitts when moving them around because they will be hot. - beeswax - how much you use depends on how big of a candle you want to make, and how many candles one block of wax can produce. Beeswax is sold at craft stores in blocks, or online from places like Amazon. - wooden skewer for stirring the melted wax mixture while it cools down into liquid form (if using glass jars) before pouring them into votive molds. You could also just gently stir by hand when they are ready!   Step two: prepare your metal container according to step one above if needed. This bowl should fit inside another larger bowl filled halfway up with water so it acts like a double boiler system when melting down the wax. If using glass jars, use oven mitts when moving them around because they will be hot. Step three: cut your beeswax into chunks and place it in the metal container over a low heat source. You can also do this step using glass containers if melting down at higher temperatures or for a longer period. Step four: stir as needed until all the chunks have melted together completely into liquid form. This process takes about 15-20 minutes depending on how much you are melting down! Make sure that there is no water or moisture from getting into the bowl while doing this part which could cause your entire batch of wax to spoil so take caution during stirring steps. Step five: prepare the wick for how big of a candle you want to make! You can find these online or in craft stores - how to put a wick on a jar? Step six: add an appropriate amount of beeswax-based on how big of a candle you want to create. The more wax the stronger and longer-lasting your candle will be, but start small because it's always easy to add more as needed during this process! Step seven: once the mixture has cooled down from step five above, pour into votive molds that have been prepared previously according to steps one through three above if needed. Votive molds are inexpensive and great for first-timers who do not know how much they'll need since there is no need to have a specific number of candles. Step eight: let the wax mixture cool down for about an hour before placing wick into votive molds if using them! You can also put in your wooden skewer so it's ready when you are after this step. Step nine: place wick inside votive molds, and securely tighten lids over the top so they do not pop open during the next steps or while being used later on!   Step ten: wait another 24-48 hours until cooled completely before lighting up your beeswax candle! CONCLUSION Beeswax candles are a safe and pleasant alternative to paraffin candles. Unlike paraffin candles, beeswax candles produce natural, soothing light. Beeswax candles are also a more environmentally friendly option, unlike paraffin candles that are made from oil. Since beeswax candles are a renewable resource that can be found in your backyard or bought from a local farmer, it is a safe and sustainable option. Beeswax candles can be very expensive, but it is a worthy investment for a healthy and environmentally friendly home. Did I mention that beeswax candles smell amazing? Beeswax Candles: An Eco-Friendly, Healthy, and Soothing Choice. If you choose to use beeswax candles in your home during winter, you'll notice that your energy bill might decrease. Beeswax candles also have a warm and comforting scent, which will make your house feel cozy. Beeswax candles are an excellent winter purchase that will make your home look and smell great. Candles also are a very common gift for any occasion. Candles with jewelry inside are present at every celebration and also give a great mood in the house. Some candles can be used as a romantic gift or on birthdays, anniversaries. Also can be used as a decoration if you put it on the window sill or near the door. For lovely-surprising beeswax candles reviews, take in the full aroma of our Green Tea & Honey.
Lasers Vs Chemical Peels - What's Best For Your Skin?
Scarring from acne? Fine lines and wrinkles? Pigmentation and sun spots? Is any of this ringing a bell? They do happen, regrettably, and when they do, we panic. We've looked everywhere, from skincare products that claim to remove age spots to lengthy Google searches, expecting to find the 'magic' treatment that can eradicate the skin's textural imperfections and beyond. Fortunately, there are alternatives. Chemical peels and laser treatments, two skin resurfacing techniques that remove damaged skin to encourage skin regeneration, are used. What is the final outcome? Smoother and more rejuvenated skin. Combating skin problems has never been easier, but if you're new to the world of skin resurfacing, it might be intimidating. What Is the Difference Between Chemical Peels and Laser Treatments? Skin resurfacing techniques such as chemical peels and laser treatments remove old skin to promote the formation of new skin. Both procedures are frequently used to treat acne scars and hyperpigmentation, fine lines and wrinkles, and sun exposure issues such as pigmentation spots. Chemical peels and laser treatments are distinguished by the procedure itself. The first, as the name implies, employs chemical treatments to remove damaged skin, whilst the second employs lasers. Chemical peels use different amounts of acid solutions to treat the skin's outer layer. There are three types of peels: superficial, medium, and deep. Superficial chemical peels (for example, VI Peel and lactic acid peels) are delicate and exfoliate the skin lightly with weak acids. Medium chemical peels (for example, glycolic acid peels and TCA peels) are more invasive and penetrate the middle and outer layers of the skin. Deep chemical peels (e.g., phenol acid peels) are the most potent, employing strong acids to penetrate as well as remove damaged skin cells. Laser resurfacing treatments use light beams to penetrate the skin, eliminating one column at a time. Although laser removal is more exact, it is often more expensive than chemical peels. There are two types of lasers: ablative and non-ablative. Ablative lasers (such as CO2 and erbium) offer the best effects by vaporizing the skin. Non-ablative lasers (for example, Fraxel) are less intrusive to the skin because they heat it rather than destroying it. Because non-ablative lasers are less strong than ablative lasers, numerous sessions may be required to achieve the optimum results. While chemical peels and laser treatments are distinct in their advantages and the concerns they address, there is some overlap in the issues they address. A strong TCA (trichloroacetic acid) chemical peel, for example, can give resurfacing comparable to that of a resurfacing laser, or both peels and lasers can be utilized to treat acne and acne scars. In terms of skin tone, the two surgeries are also dissimilar. Chemical peels assist those with darker skin tones the most because they are an excellent pigmentation treatment. People with dark skin tones are more prone to hyperpigmentation concerns such as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation due to an overabundance of melanin in their skin (PIH). Acid solutions are used in chemical peels to encourage collagen formation, and antioxidants are used to further penetrate and treat pigmentation in darker skin. What Are the Most Common Chemical Peel Types? Vi Peel The VI Peel is a painless, mild peel that is appropriate for all skin types and tones. It is made up of trichloroacetic acid, Retin-A, salicylic acid, phenol, and vitamin C and is widely used to treat hyperpigmentation and repair UV damage. Lactic peel A lactic peel is made from milk and is ideal for dry or sensitive skin. It balances the pH of the skin and exfoliates gently by dissolving dead skin cells. Glycolic peel Glycolic acid, which is used in glycolic peels, stimulates the synthesis of new collagen and elastin by targeting the skin's outer layer. It is frequently used to treat acne, acne scars, and to tighten pores. TCA peel A TCA peel, which is more harsh than a glycolic peel, contains trichloroacetic acid. It is commonly used to lighten skin pigmentation and smooth wrinkles. Phenol peel To address severe wrinkles and discolouration, a phenol peel penetrates the skin thoroughly. When compared to gentler peels, it typically necessitates a lengthy recovery period and may be unpleasant. What Are the Most Frequently Used Laser Treatments? Fraxel Laser Treatment The Fraxel Laser Treatment uses FDA-approved fractional laser technology to revitalize skin. This laser is best effective on acne scars and tiny wrinkles that are mild to moderate in severity. CO2 Laser Treatment The CO2 Laser Treatment uses pixelated carbon dioxide lasers to treat more severe skin issues like deep wrinkles and acne scars. In general, this laser is unsuccessful for treating skin redness. Erbium Laser The Erbium laser is a less invasive and gentler laser treatment than the CO2 laser. The laser increases collagen formation by penetrating the epidermis (the outer skin layer). It's commonly used to remove wrinkles, fine lines, and age spots. Which Of These Is the Best Skin Care Treatment? It all boils down to your skin type and concerns, in a nutshell. It can be difficult to determine the best course of action, therefore it is always advisable to visit with a dermatologist to discuss your concerns and treatment choices. Not all chemical peels and laser procedures are suited for people with darker skin tones. Are you unsure about your situation? When in doubt, always consult a dermatologist. THE MOST EFFECTIVE ACNE SCAR TREATMENT A chemical peel used to treat hyperpigmentation. Textural changes, such as atrophic or indented scars, respond better to laser skin treatments. A TCA chemical peel, on the other hand, can help with acne scars. Combination methods, which include laser, peels, subcision, and/or dermal fillers, are widely used. WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT IF THIS IS MY FIRST CHEMICAL PEEL/LASER TREATMENT? With chemical peels, expect some redness and peeling following, depending on the type of peel. Not every peel results in apparent peeling. Post-laser skin side effects may include redness, peeling, swelling, and bruising, depending on the laser used. If you use topical treatments, you should discontinue them a few days before the procedure. You may be advised to stop using retinoids, hydroxy acids, benzoyl peroxide, or other harsh, drying, and potentially irritating substances depending on the peel and laser. As a preventative step, patients with a history of cold sores may be given antiviral drugs. WILL A CHEMICAL PEEL OR A LASER TREATMENT BE APPROPRIATE FOR MY SKIN? If you have any of the following conditions, you should avoid chemical peels and laser treatments: - Active infections in the treatment regions - Will be exposed to sunlight after treatment - Have a history of keloids or hypertrophic scars. - A lack of enough post-treatment recuperation time. - Have a darker skin tone (this applies to certain types of chemical peels and laser resurfacing treatments). Whether you choose a chemical peel or a laser treatment, there is a resurfacing skin option for you!