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south australian tourism :: be consumed / Cannes Corporate Media & TV Awards 2013 Grand Prix Grand Prix

the Kangaroo Island campaign for their client South Australian Tourism Commissionâs, KWP! has launched a new national campaign for Barossa. After Kangaroo Island, it was fascinating to revisit the tourism genre, to open up the language and to bring out the soul of another, very different place. The approach was to bring out a sense of vitality, heritage and for me this frontier sense that is borne out of its producers and the experience of spending time there. It has been a great collaboration between the agency, kwp!, myself and a client in David that is engaged and has a strong opinion and is able to support the vision. Category: Travel, transport & tourism Client: South Australian Tourism Commission Agency: kwp! Advertising Production: Moth Projects Country: Australia Director: Jeffrey Darling Creative Director: James Rickard Art Director: Michael Gagliardi Producer: Fiona McConaghy
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Pixar changed multiple scenes in 'Inside Out' to cater to International Audiences
What you see depends on the country you live in. If you walk into a movie theater somewhere else in the world, Pixar's 'Inside Out' may look a little different from the American version you saw back at home. From the food to the sports to the cultural mannerisms, some things are slightly different. Pixar created 28 graphics for 45 uniquely different shots to be inserted for local audiences. So far Pixar has made over $553 million to date spanning multiple countries across the world. Director Pete Docter said they wanted the film to remain complex and emotional while making sense with the foreign audience's culture. Sometimes Pixar films aren't strictly perfect domestically so they make some tweaks to create the best product. This isn't the first company to change it's movie for a foreign audience. Marvel with "Iron Man 3" added scenes for Chinese audiences to incorporate Gu Li Duo, a popular Chinese milk drink, and a scene where Iron Man is saved by a famous Chinese character. In Adam Sandler's "Pixels", a scene was taken out so that Chinese audiences would not see the Great Wall of China destroyed. As you can see, your country has a huge influence. Doctor said for 'Inside Out', “We learned that some of our content wouldn’t make sense in other countries. For example, in Japan, broccoli is not considered gross. Kids love it. So we asked them, ‘What’s gross to you?’ They said green bell peppers, so we remodeled and reanimated three separate scenes replacing our broccoli with green peppers.” In this scene, Riley's dad is having a hard time getting her to eat broccoli. She squirms and turns away in disgust as he continuously attempts to have her eat it. In the United States, it is a normal thing for a child to dislike broccoli. But in Japan, broccoli is substituted by bell peppers since Japanese children think those are gross instead. That slight cultural difference changed an entire scene in the film to be more relatable and to evoke EMOTION. Though Hockey is traditionally a Canadian pastime, Hockey is still largely popular in the northern parts of the United States such as US state, Minnesota. Hockey is still just as American for many people however most of the world isn't exposed to hockey frequently which is why Pixar changed it to soccer. Soccer is the world's most popular sport. Docter also mentioned,“We offered a version with soccer instead of hockey since soccer is huge in so many parts of the world. But some countries that are into soccer actually decided to stick with hockey since the characters in the movie are from Minnesota and it makes sense that they’d be hockey fans.” Did you know that even how we read words is different in various parts of the world? Well Pixar took note of that being noted by Docter, "Bing Bong reads a sign in the film to Joy and Sadness. He points at the letters, D-A-N-G-E-R, saying ‘it’s a shortcut.’ Not only did we translate the sign, but we even went so far as to reanimate Bing Bong so that he points to the letters from right to left, instead of left to right to accommodate certain languages.” Do you think it's necessary to change a movie for a foreign audience?
[Ladies' Week] Inspirational Ads
Ok. I usually don't like ads. But when it comes to sports ads, especially inspirational sports ads, I love watching them. I would sometimes go on YouTube just to watch motivational sports commercials over and over again. Well, once again, in celebration of Ladies' Week, I want to share some of my favorite sports commercials with y'all. Sit back and let's get pumped! 1. Nike - Better For It This ad's main message is to support women on their athletic journeys. We all have our own insecurities when it comes to working out. However, this particular campaign empowers women to be better through inspiration and motivation to push to the next level. It's so motivating and it also sends message to the rest of the world that there is no such thing as masculine or feminine when it comes to exercising. Everyone is equal and everyone has the power to turn "can't" into "can". 2. Always - Like A Girl This ad is definitely one of the most powerful ads I've ever seen in my life. Due to the stereotypes that exist in society, girls may lose confidence as they grow older. The rest of society could also be bound by these types of stereotypes. But this commercial can change the perceptions that people have of the phrase, "like a girl". It also has inspired me to take part in this campaign and change the phrase "like a girl" from an insult to something positive. 3. P&G - Thank You Mom Moms are the best. Even though I have not yet been a parent, I always get a bit misty when I watch this ad. A powerful element in this commercial is that athletes are not the focus here. Instead, the focus is on the dedicated moms that pick them back up when they fall. Of course, we cannot forget about all the dads around the world, but let me say this one more time: moms are the best! Well, another shoutout to @shannonl5 for planning this awesome event and you guys should all join if you still haven't heard about it yet! Also, what are your favorite women's sports commercials? Comment in the comments section below!
In-N-Out Comes To Australia; Sells Out Instantly
Thanks to the glory that is social media, 'foodie' culture has allowed for plenty of marketing potential in the restaurant industry. When we have a good meal (or, at least, an incredibly aesthetically pleasing one), we take a picture for Instagram, we check-in on Facebook, we leave a review on Yelp. In fact, in a recent survey conducted by Compete.com, 50% of adults aged 18 - 32 years said they become aware of particular foods and restaurants via social media. Which is why, when California fast food chain In-N-Out Burger made its way to Australia this week, the results were unlike anything you would've expected in a pre-Facebook generation. Because of their viral success, In-N-Out is able to open 'pop up' shops all around the world, allowing local food porn enthusiasts just four hours to be able to try their famous burgers for themselves. Because of the limited time and the increasing concept of 'FOMO', the lines are understandably huge, and Sydney, Australia's case was no different. (Aussie food blogger Rebecca Sullivan called it "herd mentality in its most embarrassing form." I call it, "How dare you underestimate the majesty of a dope-ass hamburger!") Unfortunately, the In-N-Out pop-up only had enough ingredients to make 300 or so burgers, so employees gave out wristbands to the first 300 people in line, and then sent everyone else on their way. (Will this make them rue the day they met In-N-Out? Will this only make them try harder next time? Who knows.) But, as a Californian, this whole event had me thinking: Have you had In-N-Out before? Do you want to try In-N-Out? If you don't live near one, and an In-N-Out pop-up came to your neighborhood, would you try to go? Let me know in the comments below what YOU think, and for more WTF news, follow my WTF Street Journal collection.
Viral Star "Damn Daniel" Meets Ellen
Daaaaaaaamn Daniel. If you haven't seen the viral video of the newly famed star "Damn Daniel" then you're probably living off the grid. With a hilarious voice coming from high school sophomore Josh Holz, he has been making hilarious vines of his friend, Daniel Lara. Daniel is only 14 years old and a freshman at Riverside Poly High School, CA. The young heart throb is now raking in thousands of fans across social media attracting super-fandom overnight. Hundreds of crazy rumors have flooded the web, everything from Daniel being attacked to he's in hiding. Everyone is just looking for a story to add to the media craze. There are currently a pair of white vans online selling for $300,000 hoping to get someone gullible enough to buy them. This quick rise to fame though hasn't come without consequences. A recent news article hit that fans are pranking and storming Holz's home in California to get a glimpse of the kid behind the voice. The vine has also led to some negative parodies online which have garnered some heat. Of course it was a given that "Damn Daniel" and the voice behind it would appear on The Ellen Show. After a hilarious interview between Ellen and the boys, she surprised them with gifts. For Holz, she gave him an epic and brand new surfboard to commemorate his visit to the show. However, Damn Daniel was the one who truly came home with a winning prize by receiving a lifetime supply of Vans shoes thanks to Ellen partnering with Vans HQ. Talk about an awesome gift! "Back at it again with the white vans!"
9 Advertisements Probably Made By 'Cool Dads'
Advertising is quite the competitive field. You've got to be a strong communicator, someone creative, someone who has their finger on the pulse of all the up-and-coming trends. But for every catchy jingle, winning slogan, or hilarious campaign, there's about a dozen horrible, cringe-worthy attempts at - frankly - trying to make 'fetch' happen. It's almost like the advertising world is overrun with 'cool Dads'. (No offense to Vingle dads, who are as cool as they come. Obviously.) To show you guys exactly what I mean, I've decided to share 9 different so-tryhard-it's-embarrassing advertisements. You homies better know what I'm sayin'. "It's the year 2015, guys. Let's update the name of our Meatlover's Pizza with something more current. You know, something that'll resonate with the kids today." "I know. How about... EPIC MEATZ?" "Okay, so, let's create a sign that tells people using our rec center where to put used towels. But in a way that, you know, really speaks to the kids." "I know! We'll use that song all the kids on Vine are twerking to these days." "The University of Cincinnati needs us, everyone. How do we get the kids off their Twitters and into their top-ranking business school?" "No one turns down the chance to be... MBAWESOME." "We've got a new client. Owns a taco shop. He's looking for a hashtag, wants to go viral. What do you think, Cool Dad?" "Uh... #TacosFTW. Obviously." I HAVE NO JOKE TO MAKE FOR THIS ONE. THE SECOND-HAND EMBARRASSMENT IS BURNING THROUGH MY RETINAS. "Cool Dad, Target is about to get a shipment of the 20th anniversary remaster of 'The Truth About Cats And Dogs'. How do we make Janeane Garofalo relevant again?" "Don't worry. I got this. LOL." "Alright, Smirnoff advertising team. We're losing the Millennial market to Ciroc. How do we show kids we can be cool too, but without breaking #NetflixAndChill's implied copyright?" "How's about a little #StreamAndHang, homie?" "Quick, Cool Dad. Taco Bell needs a hip and current package design that illustrates how delicious their chicken quesadillaz are." "TACO BELL. I CAN'T EVEN RIGHT NOW." "So, Cool Dad, I'm sorry you've been demoted to Fortune Cookie writer, but we think you've got a skill, sir. You really know how to speak to the younger generation." [Insert Cool Dad being too busy writing EPIC FORTUNEZ to respond.] I hope all my bruhs here on Vingle found this card funny AF. Have you seen any epically dank advertisementz lately?
Graphic Design Tip: How to Brainstorm an Effective Logo
Before I started going to art school, my parents (as a lot of parents do) really overestimated my own abilities. During my high school years, they launched their own non-profit organization for breast cancer advocacy, where the entire group was essentially run out of a room of our house. My father was in charge of building the website and making sure that it ran smoothly. My mother was the spokesperson, often attending various conventions and symposiums to address those in the medical field about breast cancer and HER2+, a more aggressive expression. Launching the group was running quite smoothly until my parents approached me with a favor. They wanted me to design their logo. Andddd it didn't go so well. They gave up and found a professional. Fast forward to my life after art school, and I'm looking back at my high school years wishing I could have helped teenage me come up with a great logo design. While creating a logo is not as easy as it looks, it really is perhaps one of my favorite design challenges. There is a lot to consider when you're making a logo, and I've decided that it might be helpful to make a simplified list for all of you Vingle designers so that you can go out into the branding world and create beautiful things! 1. Keep it simple. As fun as it is to be given the opportunity to really utilize your creative side, it really isn't the appropriate time to start busting out all of those fancy and elaborate tricks you might have learned doing other projects. Creating a visually 'busy' logo is just not effective marketing. 2. Keep in mind that you're creating a symbol to represent a company. It can be pretty direct symbolism, ie: the apple logo for Apple or the red cross for American Red Cross, or it can be more abstract, similar to the Nike swoosh. Another popular logo option is to reduce down to a strictly typographic design. Disney or Kellogg's is a good example of effective typographic logos. Get creative, but keep it simple. My favorite example of balance between creativity and minimalism is the FedEx logo. Have you ever noticed there's an arrow between the E and the X? 3. Do your research. Before thumbnailing your own logo ideas, think of all of the logos you've seen that really caught your attention. Even try drawing them out freehand. Look up interviews with the advertising designers behind some of the world's most famous logos. I would recommend "To Inform and Delight", a documentary about Milton Glaser, the artist who designed the I♥NY logo. 4. When you're finally ready, begin making a list of all the descriptive words you associate with the company and how you want your audience to feel when looking at your logo, like 'friendly' or 'sophisticated'. Then think about your nouns. When you think about your company, what images come to mind? If you were creating a logo for Tropicana Orange Juice, for example, maybe the first thing you think of is a tree or an orange or a glass. Try to think of as many nouns as possible, as these will definitely help you when you start putting pencil to paper. 4. USE YOUR SKETCHBOOK. I can't stress the importance of this. I feel like a lot of artists go straight to their laptops and begin working on Photoshop or Illustrator over working on actual thumbnails first. Technology can really stifle the creative process that is so important in the early stages of design. Draw at least 100 thumbnails in your sketchbook. It will really help you push your own boundaries and give you a number of ideas to choose from. 5. When considering which thumbnail you want to use, think about the different ways your logo will be translated for pamphlets, packages, and other promotional materials. Does your logo translate well to color AND black and white? How does it look on a dark background versus a light background? How does the logo look with text and without text? Is it as visually effective when you adjust the scale? Manipulate your logo over and over, and if it is still recognizable, you probably have yourself a really iconic logo! I hope this can help some of you designers and marketers, especially those of you who might be in the middle of branding or rebranding a company. The logo is always the first start! Happy designing!