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How Tretinoin Gets Rid Of Acne and How To Use It?
Tretinoin cream is available in a variety of concentrations, ranging from .05 percent cream to creams containing up to .1 percent tretinoin. The type of tretinoin cream you use to treat acne, like many other skincare medications, can have a significant impact on your results as well as your risk of experiencing side effects. We've listed all of the different tretinoin cream concentrations that are available in the United States below. We've also discussed which concentration is best for treating and preventing acne. We've also discussed how tretinoin can be used as an acne treatment to prevent breakouts and keep your skin clear all year. What Exactly Is Acne? Acne vulgaris, also known as acne vulgaris, is a common skin condition that occurs when your hair follicles, or pores, become clogged with a mixture of sebum, dead skin cells, and other substances. Acne affects almost everyone at some point in their lives. For some, it is a condition that develops during adolescence. Adult acne breakouts, which can occur in a person's 30s, 40s, and even well into middle age, are a lifelong annoyance for others. Acne breakouts are caused by a variety of factors. One of these is sebum, a natural oil produced by your sebaceous glands. When sebum accumulates on the surface layer of your skin, it can seep into your pores and clog them. Another factor in acne is the accumulation of dead skin cells over time. These cells, which are left over from the epidermal turnover process, can combine with sebum to clog pores and cause acne. Acne can become infected, inflamed, and painful when bacteria begin to multiply inside a clogged pore. Acne can range in severity from minor comedones to severe nodules and cysts that cause skin irritation. Forms of Acne Comedonal When your pores become clogged with sebum and/or dead skin cells, these small acne lesions form. Both whiteheads and blackheads are common forms of comedonal acne. Inflammatory Because of the presence of bacteria, these acne lesions are red, tender, and occasionally painful. Consider a typical red, inflamed pimple. Inflammatory acne commonly manifests as papules and pustules. Nodular and Cystic When bacteria multiply inside acne lesions deep within your skin, these severe forms of acne develop. Nodular and cystic acne are frequently difficult to treat and can leave acne scars. How Does Tretinoin Treat Acne? Tretinoin is one of the most powerful acne treatment on the market today. In fact, tretinoin and other topical acne treatments have been referred to as a "mainstay" of therapy for acne breakouts in studies. Retinoids, such as tretinoin, work by speeding up the process by which your skin produces new cells, a process known as epidermal turnover. To understand how this prevents acne, we must first cover the fundamentals of how your skin maintains and repairs itself, as well as the effects this process can have on the texture and appearance of your skin. Your skin serves several purposes. These include acting as a barrier against infectious pathogens like fungi and bacteria, regulating your temperature, keeping water inside your body, and protecting your organs from UV radiation and its effects. In other words, your skin does more than just make you look good. The outer layer of your skin, known as the epidermis, is responsible for the majority of this work. Your epidermis constantly produces new cells to replace older, worn ones in order to maintain itself. These cells are formed in the skin's basal layers. They gradually travel to the surface over time, allowing your older skin cells to detach and shed into the environment. This process is known as epidermal turnover. Consider it your skin's way of applying a fresh coat of paint as each old layer is worn away by the environment. The length of the epidermal turnover process varies according to age and a variety of other factors. The epidermis of most people changes every 40 to 56 days. So, what does this have to do with acne, and how does tretinoin play a role in it? One of the most important factors in the development of acne breakouts is the accumulation of old skin cells on the surface layer of your skin. Tretinoin aids in the exfoliation of dead skin cells by promoting skin cell turnover. This reduces your chances of developing clogged pores that develop into comedones or other types of acne. Tretinoin has other skin benefits in addition to its ability to treat acne. It directly stimulates collagen production, which can lighten and conceal lines, wrinkles, and other signs of facial ageing. It can also help with photodamaged skin, which is rough, dry, or unevenly pigmented as a result of sun exposure. These non-acne benefits are covered in greater detail in our guide to using tretinoin to treat wrinkles and skin ageing. How Fast Does Tretinoin Work? Tretinoin begins to work as soon as it is absorbed by your skin, but it usually takes a few months before you notice any significant improvements. In most studies, it takes three to six months for tretinoin to produce visible improvements in acne severity. During this time, you may notice that your skin improves gradually, or that you have fewer pimples or other types of acne. Some people who use tretinoin for acne experience a tretinoin "purge," which is an increase in acne, skin irritation, and other symptoms after starting tretinoin treatment. This is a temporary problem that usually resolves itself after a few months. After starting tretinoin, it's critical to persevere and be patient. It does work, but it may take a few months before you notice any significant changes in your skin. Which Tretinoin Cream Concentrations Are There? Tretinoin acne cream is available in several strengths in the United States, ranging from .025 percent, .05 percent, and .1 percent. Side Effects of Tretinoin Concentrations Tretinoin is a medication that is both safe and effective for the vast majority of people. However, it, like all medications, has the potential for side effects. The majority of these are minor and temporary, but there are a few you should be aware of before using any tretinoin-containing product. Tretinoin may cause the following side effects: A stinging or warming sensation Skin that is red, scaling, or dry An increase in acne lesions for a short period of time Lighter or darker skin discolouration Blisters, crusting, and swelling of the skin Pain, burning, redness, or flakiness are all symptoms of a bacterial infection. Tretinoin can also have serious side effects, especially if you have sensitive skin or skin that is easily irritated by topical treatments. If you experience severe irritation, hives, itching, or pain after applying topical tretinoin, contact your dermatologist right away. Another important tretinoin side effect to be aware of is that it can increase your skin's susceptibility to sunlight, making you more susceptible to sunburn. If you use tretinoin, you should exercise caution in bright sunlight. Wear protective clothing to shield your face from bright sunlight, apply sunscreen, and avoid prolonged sun exposure, even if it is artificial, as much as possible. The higher the concentration of tretinoin cream, as with most skin medications, the more significant the results. Creams with a higher tretinoin concentration are more effective at preventing acne and premature skin ageing, but they are also more likely to cause side effects. These side effects may be more common if you combine tretinoin with another acne treatment, such as benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid. What Tretinoin Strength Should I Use for Acne? There is no "best" concentration of tretinoin cream for the treatment of acne because everyone's skin is different. Most people who use tretinoin, whether for acne prevention or as an anti-aging cream, experiment with different concentrations over time before settling on the type of cream that works best for their skin. Most dermatologists in the India begin by prescribing low strength medications to their patients. If this cream is ineffective in treating your acne, your doctor may advise you to try a stronger tretinoin cream. If you experience side effects like skin irritation, redness, or peeling, your doctor may recommend switching to a lower strength tretinoin cream, using the cream less frequently, or using an alcohol-free face moisturiser in conjunction with the tretinoin cream to prevent dryness. Finally, keep in mind that tretinoin frequently causes the most serious side effects during the first two to six weeks of use. This means that even if the concentration and dosage are perfect, there is still a chance that you will experience irritation and other "purge" effects when you begin treatment.
6 Easy Ways To A Smooth Neck
Because the skin on your neck is some of the thinnest on your body, it is also one of the first places to show signs of ageing. Here are six ways to make your neck look younger and address everything from sun damage to sagging on this delicate area. 1. WEAR SUNSCREEN EVERY SINGLE DAY. Your dermatologist will agree that a nickel-sized amount of sunscreen applied to your neck and chest every day will help prevent collagen breakdown and the formation of sunspots. Don't forget to massage the sides and back of your neck. 2. MAINTAIN YOUR SKIN'S MOISTURIZATION. Again, the skin on your neck is thinner and has fewer oil glands than the rest of your body, so keeping the area hydrated is essential for a smoother overall texture. Look for peptide-containing creams (which can help stimulate new collagen growth) and apply them in gentle, upward strokes from your chest to your jawline. 3. RECLAIM YOUR BEAUTY SLEEP. Do you always wake up with pillow lines on the side of your neck? Apply one of these silicone patches before going to bed to keep your skin from crinkling while you sleep. You'll wake up with a smoother neck and less chance of further damage. 4. FOCUS ON CORRECT POSTURE. The amount of time we spend looking down at our phones and screens has resulted in what we now refer to as "tech neck." The simplest solution would be to limit screen time entirely, but more realistically, you should keep everything as close to eye level as possible to avoid unnecessary wrinkling. 5. GIVE LASER TREATMENTS A GO AHEAD. Still have fine lines on your neck? Fraxel lasers, stimulate your body's natural repair process to promote collagen growth. Fraxel can also be used to treat any dark spots or broken capillaries in the area, giving you a more even complexion. 6. ULTRASOUND TREATMENT FOR SERIOUS REPAIR. Ultherapy or Ultracel is your best non-surgical option for deeper, more stubborn lines and sagging. The FDA-approved treatment uses heat generated by focused sonic waves to penetrate deeper into the skin and stimulate the production of new collagen. Take note that the effect is gradual, and most patients notice a lifting effect three to six months after the initial treatment, so be patient.
Hyaluronic Acid - The Natural Skin Plumping Sugar
Despite its tough pronunciation and even more complicated spelling; hyaluronic acid is an important part of your daily skin care routine. It's widely used in serums, sheet masks, and moisturisers. This is because HA, a naturally occurring molecule in the skin, binds to water and plumps the face, giving it a dewy, glowing appearance. It's clear that word of its benefits has spread, as it's one of the most sought-after ingredients in skin-care products. Aside from increasing skin moisture levels, hyaluronic acid serves other functions. What is hyaluronic acid, exactly? Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring sugar molecule in the skin that helps water bind to collagen, keeping it in place and giving the skin a plumper, dewier, and more hydrated appearance. Essentially, hyaluronic acid improves skin hydration, which helps to maintain the skin's youthful, full, and bouncy appearance. Collagen in our dermis determines the structure of our skin. Natural hyaluronic acid is covalently linked to water molecules on one side and collagen on the other, providing plumpness to the skin. What is hyaluronic acid's function? As we age, our collagen and hyaluronic acid levels gradually decline, causing our skin to become increasingly dry. Furthermore, winter heaters, specific skin care products, and underlying skin disorders can cause microscopic tears in the protective skin barrier, allowing water to escape. As a result, implementing a customised skin care regimen that includes moisturising products could be extremely beneficial. Hyaluronic acid, glycerin, colloidal oatmeal, urea, propylene glycol, and sorbitol are humectants, which draw water to the skin to hydrate it. These chemicals can be found in a variety of products, such as moisturisers, eye creams, and serums. The use of HA-containing products tightens the skin around the eyes, increases moisture to reduce puffiness, and softens fine wrinkles throughout the face. Hyaluronic acid is effective when applied topically due to its ease of penetration. Our skin is the largest organ in the body, soaking up up to 60% of the nutrients applied to it. Furthermore, the lightweight, fluid nature of hyaluronic acid, as well as its ability to retain moisture from the environment and deeper dermis to completely hydrate the skin, are benefits. Who should benefit from hyaluronic acid? All skin types benefit from hyaluronic acid. It is non-irritating in general and does not aggravate acne, rosacea, or allergic skin conditions. However, there is a very small chance of experiencing any negative consequences. Individuals with dry and/or older skin will benefit the most from the application of hyaluronic acid. Because our bodies produce less hyaluronic acid as we age, people in their forties and fifties will benefit the most from applying it topically. Despite the fact that the term "acid" appears in the term of hyaluronic acid, those with sensitive skin should not be worried; it is completely safe for everyone. Because hyaluronic acid is naturally produced in our bodies, there are no known side effects from using it. If you have an allergic reaction to it or a product that contains it, contact your dermatologist immediately; the reaction could be caused by another active or inactive ingredient. Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Injections of hyaluronic acid are also available. Hyaluronic acid is a gel-like substance found in dermal fillers that attracts water after injection to replenish volume and restore lost structure. This helps to smooth the appearance of lines and wrinkles while also reducing the overall sunken or drooping appearance of the face. These dermal fillers can be used to treat nasolabial folds, marionette lines, cheek augmentation, chin augmentation, undereyes, lips, and back of the hands, among other things. Because the quality of fillers varies, it's critical to consult with your dermatologist about your options to ensure you get the best one for you. A cosmetic surgeon compares different types of hyaluronic acid fillers to different types of paintbrushes. They all contain the same component, but the density, lift-ability, and durability of the molecules vary depending on their size and arrangement. Additionally, it is reversible. Because it is injected into your face, it is not permanent. Because hyaluronic acid dermal fillers are reversible, your dermatologist can dissolve the filler quickly using the enzyme hyaluronidase if you are dissatisfied with the results or if a blood artery is blocked during the injection process. The enzyme works quickly; the substance dissolves quickly and is completely destroyed within 24 to 48 hours. Individuals who are allergic to bees, on the other hand, should proceed with caution — and consult a dermatologist — before attempting hyaluronidase-based therapy because the enzyme is found in bee venom. Hyaluronic acid fillers, on the other hand, are not for everyone. Except for pregnant women, the vast majority of people can benefit from hyaluronic acid fillers. Pregnancy and fillers have not been thoroughly studied, but dermatologists generally avoid injecting pregnant women due to uncertainty. Furthermore, if you have a current skin infection, you should avoid these fillers. First, treat the infection, and then return to your appointment once your dermatologist has given you the all-clear. If you're thinking about using hyaluronic fillers, there are a few minor risks to be aware of. Bruising and swelling are the most common side effects of any injectable treatment. The good news is that these shortfalls will only last a short time. Tenderness should subside within a few days. To reduce the risk of bruising, blood-thinning medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and red wine should be avoided for about a week before treatment. Furthermore, arnica and bromelain may aid in the reduction of swelling and bruising.
[Poll] Which Rumored Idol Pair Do You Think Dated in Real Life?
Although more idols are open to being, well, open, about their relationships these days, there are some that refuse to ‘fess up about their rumored romances. Whether you think the scandals are completely baseless or sprouted from a grain of truth, we want to know, which rumored idol pair, past and present, you think secretly dated in real life. Kara’s Goo Hara-Lee Soo Hyuk Kara’s Goo Hara and actor/model Lee Soo Hyuk are the latest hot young stars to take over the rumor mill, when fans spotted the two shopping together in Japan. The stars’ agencies immediately shot down rumors of a romance, stating they were merely close friends and that Goo Hara was acting as Kim Soo Hyuk’s “guide,” while they were both in Japan. “Guide” is a new one, but what say you? Is there more than meets the eye between these two? Super Junior’s Eunhyuk and IU K-Pop fans are already well-versed in the scandal that broke out last year after IU “accidentally” tweeted a photo of herself with Super Junior’s Eunhyuk looking quite close and friendly. Again, the artists’ agencies denied the claims, but that hasn’t stopped the rumors from swirling about the idol stars, even sparking marriage rumors this year. Marriage may be a little overboard, but that photo… TVXQ’s Changmin and f(x)’s Victoria Those darn SNS photos. TVXQ’s Changmin and f(x)’s Victoria were at the center of another celebrity scandal that rocked the K-Pop world earlier this year when Victoria posted a photo of what appeared to be an innocent meal on her Weibo. Hawk-eyed netizens, however, zoomed in on a figure reflected on a spoon seen in the photo, claiming it was TVXQ’s Changmin and that the two were on a date. What made fans grow more suspicious was that Victoria immediately deleted the photo after netizens made the discovery. Although SM Entertainment admitted that the figure was indeed Changmin but also stated other people were with them at the time. 2PM’s Taecyeon and SNSD’s Jessica Rumors of an idol couple flared when 2PM’s Taecyeon and SNSD’s Jessica were spotted out an about together on multiple occasions in 2011. Jessica and Taecyeon both addressed the rumors, openly denying they were an item, but we can’t help but wonder if sparks ever flew between the young stars. Big Bang’s G-Dragon and 2NE1’s CL Our final rumored pair hasn’t made headlines (yet), but we’re sure Big Bang fans and 2NE1 fans have wondered at some point - what if two of K-Pop’s fiercest leaders were actually dating? They’ve collaborated on hot tracks like The Leaders, performed on stage together, and fans know they hang out, but could they have been more than badass label mates all this time? Let us know what you think by voting below!
Kpop Challenge Day 14 & 15
Day 14: Favorite Leaders Jun.K (2PM) not exactly the leader since 2PM doesn't have one but he's the oldest and seems leadershipy and at least he stayed G-Dragon (BIG BANG) There's a reason they've been around for so long Victoria Song -F(x) She gets over looked a lot but I think she's managed to keep f(x) in check Im Jaebum (GOT7) I love the freedom he tends to give them.. only pulling them back when necessary Day 15: Favorite Maknaes Jean JungKook (BTS) everyones fave cute maknae Kim Yugyeom (GOT7) this boy though. giant maknae that looks like the hyung Nam TaeHyun (WINNER) the most diva of all the maknaes.. he just doesn't give a shit Hwang ChanSung (2PM) My original Giant Maknae Im ChangKyun (MONSTA X) Life ruiner.. period. enough said @DallasYamane (SQUADEU) But Most Importantly this is my favorite Maknae.. @ninjamidori @taehyungkey @luna1171 @creetheotaku @emilypeacock @staceyholley @kellyoconnor @aimeeh @ligaya @queenlee @annahizaragoza @jiyongixoxo @armystarlight @princessunicorn @kpopandkimchi @unniecakesali @khouyang @alexisrivers @amandamuska @tashiannabostic @innocenttiashi @nikkitty @externallyelli @xxxtina @crystalguerra @bulletproofv @vkookie47 @sarsoosoo99 @helixx @babrajan1 @agirlwholovesV @Tleahedwards @sugamint @saraortiz2002 @lizzeh @parktaemi @silentpianist @terratoyashi @sosoaloraine23 @babyluhan @kpossible4250 @briannaN @isoldapazo @Vay754 @jasmineyap108 @lashonda0917 @sugakookies @JasminMartinez @isolate @adetoro @yeniyx23 @destinabyrd @naehudall @xxygxx @eliseb @stephaniepoore @maddie27 @edwey66 @MaricelvaRomero @mariahmaes @cristinreynolds @deniseiagardner @chace @terratoyasi @tacos4life143 @mahelysandoval @dallasyamane @chelseagarcia @sofiafifi @aaliyahnewbell @gabbylu13 @alyssagelet818 @veronicaartino @jezzicrypt @tiffany1922 @alysanguyen @msloyalheart @anna5221 @aracelijimenez @badtz @gaehwa @mzdawson31508 @resavalencia @merryjane13 @bluemoon201 @cheyennejessee @kpopaddict415 @linnyok @miss148 @batgirl225319 @kyokeo @bubblekookie @melissagarza @lisettezapata @samariaallen @jasminewilliams @chahakyum @bridgetJara @kaelishearer @callmemsdragon @breehubler @jiminsjams4 @aliciazitting88 @kekers96 @exxygomez24 @destinymccauley @mariamusic @P1B2Bear @agentleo @zeltincorona @vixenvivi @dayzc @mirandastephens @vickyle @ivethcrisoforo @hyunsaeng638 @princessfirefox @jinnyrod3 @sarabear1021 @dejaunaesider @satinskies @lexxcisco @taeyungscutie @eswee @jmnzangel @hopekookie @sarahdarwish @miyukichan @mrsjeon @isismayavelasco @kel53 @serenitythao Let me know if you would like to be added or removed from future Card's
Stop Washing Your Face in The Shower - Here's Why.
Women with sensitive skin, acne prone skin, or dry skin have probably heard a common refrain from their expert friends and family about how their shower time could be exacerbating their problems. It's such a common refrain in the skincare world that some people question whether you should even shower daily — for reasons other than the potential harm to your face. What kind of shower is best for your facial skin? Long or short? Is it better to bathe with cold or warm water? The truth is that the verdict on showers and their benefits for the skin on your face isn't all that clear, and rather than accepting one opinion as "gospel," you should consider your own skin needs and how showering may help or stop you from getting your face what it needs in order to glow. What Happens to Your Skin in a Shower? The question of what showering does to your skin is perhaps the most important information in this discussion — and there are already some disagreements. However, the general consensus is that showering daily can have a few negative effects on your skin and the skin on your face. In the worst-case scenario, daily showering can exacerbate skin problems such as dry skin, itching, cracking, and bacterial overgrowth. Showering can help reduce skin bacteria, which is sometimes beneficial — but not always. While it may come as a surprise, bacteria are not all bad. In fact, bacteria and the health of your skin have a close relationship. Bacteria are necessary for the health of your skin. For example, in order for your immune system to function properly, it must be exposed to microorganisms on a regular basis. Keeping your skin clean and free of dirt and bacteria does not make you healthier; instead, it prevents your immune system from properly training its antibodies for future encounters. As a result, the antibacterial soaps that many people use in showers and hand scrubbing situations may kill off the important 'should be here' bacteria. When this happens, you're merely making room for more dangerous bacteria to colonise. And this is a major concern for people who take hot showers frequently, because excessive showering can cause your skin to dry and crack over time, allowing these more dangerous bacteria to enter your body beneath the skin barrier. This can lead to major issues, infections, and problems in the future. Is it bad to wash your face while you shower? Despite all of our warnings, there are still plenty of reasons to take our advice with a grain of salt. While a celebrity dermatologist may recommend you not to wash your face during your shower routine, the reality is that there is very little evidence to suggest any danger to your face in particular. We couldn't find any studies that suggested that washing your face in the shower could cause an increase in acne, wrinkles, dryness, or skin conditions like rosacea or eczema. The wrong products, many of which may be in your shower, are what will cause your skin problems. For example, the American Academy of Dermatology Association (AAD) recommends avoiding alcohol and abrasive cleaners, as well as sponges, washcloths and mesh cleaning tools that can irritate your skin. That means that many of the tools you use to wash your body (and may have in your shower) aren't good for your facial skin. And, after a thorough body scrub, remember not to scrub too hard on your face. Cleansers should be applied with your fingertips, and the cleanser should be removed with the same care. And, as the AAD points out, there's the issue of water temperature, which they recommend for face washing be "lukewarm." This is likely unhappy news if you enjoy hot or cold showers. Is water temperature important? You're probably wondering, "Why the big deal about hot water?" What about saunas, steam rooms and hot towels? "What exactly is it about my shower water that is so bad for my face?" As it turns out, there's a lot that can go wrong with it. Excessively hot water has been linked to an increased risk of irritation and inflammation of the skin on your face, according to research. As far as we're concerned, this does not imply that taking a shower is bad for your face. It does, however, imply that your face-specific routine may be best staged outside of the shower, where you can control temperature, reduce the risk of injury due to water temperature fluctuations, and generally do better work for your skin health. You may be wondering about the benefits of steam and whether they mitigate the risk of irritation. Steam and hot water have numerous benefits for your skin — and the things that live in your skin. Steam can loosen and soften buildup, making blackheads and other solid blemishes easier to remove from your pores. Steaming your skin can also provide additional benefits for serums and moisturisers later on. Topical products can often be better accepted by your skin by opening up your pores and making your skin more permeable. And, contrary to popular belief, steam is beneficial to your skin's relative moisture levels. It can not only help you add water to your individual skin cells, but it can also help make subsequent products like moisturisers and serums more effective. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, steam increases blood flow in your skin's blood vessels, which can lead to increased collagen production and, eventually, plump and firm skin. All of this being said, it is recommended that you use a hot towel or bowl rather than a shower, as this gives you more control over the time and level of contact water has with your face, as well as the ability to adjust the temperature. These things are important for people who have rosacea and redness, as well as those who have broken capillaries. Women with sensitive skin should exercise caution as well, as steaming can aggravate inflammatory conditions (which means people with eczema should also be wary). When You Should Wash Your Face Instead So, the shower is off, and we both agree on that. So, where do you wash your face? When, where, and why? You should wash your face twice a day, plus more if you get sweaty, as you might after exercise or time in the sun. In most cases, washing once in the morning and once at night is sufficient. According to what we can tell, you're fine to do one of those washes right after a shower — lukewarm water and a non-abrasive, non-alcoholic cleanser are the gentle combination you'll need. Just remember to be a little gentler than you would be with your back, legs, or feet. By the way, now is the ideal time to apply a moisturiser. Hot showers (especially long ones) can dry out your skin, and for people with psoriasis and other skin issues, they can aggravate existing problems. The best time to replenish lost moisture and protect yourself for the day ahead is after your post-shower face wash.