nautshell
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Why You Need to Fail

I found this video in a book I was reading about product design. The message (see 12:58 about the ceramics class) really got me thinking that I should try drawing on the computer. It's been something that I've thought about doing for a very long time but never got around to it. I would say it's largely due to having the wrong mindset. Anyway, this collection is dedicated to that giving it a go. Oh yes and thank you Derek Sivers for the advice.
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I wish I knew everyone's username... I watched this video and wanted to share it with all of you. I think it's something everyone should listen too. (@cheerfulcallie @divalycious @ameliasantos10 @onesemile @caricakes @peteryang292 @gabyrich @Tammykim @sussurrus @suzyy0919 @neaa @saharhyunjoong @alexandreia @dillonk @jackjb @imliz @strawberrychip @flymetothemoon @andwabisabi @benard@nokcha @dashburst @medusa)
@peteryang292 In hindsight I think it didn't matter that I knew I was learning from my failures, because like you said I still learned from them subconsciously
@sjeanyoon Thank you for sharing this! It has a very powerful message! @peteryang292 I couldn't agree more.
@peteryang292 as someone who is older, I can say that that will be very important as you continue to grow and get older
This applies to parenting too. Sometimes I have to remind myself that it's okay to not be perfect.
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