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Why Are These Kids At A Rave?
The 1990s were a simpler time - at least in the realm of kid birthday parties. You went out for laser tag or group-watched a movie. You had slumber parties or rented the 'party room' at your local roller rink. However, sometime between then and now, Skrillex happened - which brings us to the latest trend in children's birthday parties - KIDDIE RAVES. Introducing CirKiz - it's like that neon EDM-packed post-apocalypse you used to go to in college. But with safer goodie bags. You got your wildin' out, glowstick-wielding white bros. Guy with a cool haircut working the 1's and 2's. The person who's been going hard on fruit punch all night. And the one in the corner, currently regretting the fruit punch. CirKiz was created by some NYC-based, EDM-loving parents - Jesse Sprague and Jenny Song - who wanted to create a special place "where families can listen and dance to DJs, see live performances, and experience a nightclub environment in a safe, controlled daytime setting." Available in both New York and London, parents can choose one of several popular warehouse venues and trendy nightclubs for their CirKiz-sponsored event. One such venue, I was surprised to learn, is Cielo, a New York spot known for hosting some pretty 'high-brow' house and trance DJs. In fact, that's exactly where Jesse and Jenny first came up with their Cirkiz idea: "We had [our son's] 1st birthday party at Cielo. We invited friends with kids and friends without. It was so much fun for everyone we decided to make it an annual event but in different clubs. The message we got from all our friends was clear and consistent: 'You should do this professionally and turn it into a business... I'd pay to go.' So after years of just doing it for fun, we finally got our act together and did exactly that." Currently, CirKiz is hosting a 'winter series' of raves at NYC's Space Ibiza on Sundays, where ticket prices range from $15 - 20 per person. You can check out more details at their official website or you can be like me and just stare at these pictures, feeling equal parts confused and disturbed. With that being said: What do you guys think? Is combining kids and rave culture a good idea or bad idea? Let me know in the comments below. (Also shout-out to the LED robot in this picture up here. For a part-time job, that's - admittedly - rad as hell.)
Disney Princesses Singing In Their Native Languages
English is not the native tongue of Disney Princesses. Everyone has grown up with Disney Princesses because they are the most innocent form of childhood entertainment. With the fantastic movies comes even better songs which make them so appealing. Your infatuation with them carries on into adulthood and before you know it, you're sitting in your living room watching the movies singing along with your own children. Crazy right? Well, here's the thing, English is the default language, not the native one. All Disney Princesses have come from other countries other than Pocahontas who was a Native American in North America (present day USA). It brings up a really interesting change because when you watch the Disney movies in their native languages, it has an entirely new meaning because it's authentically and historically correct. Disney Americanizes our movies through using English and we forget that languages play a huge role in presenting emotions, interactions, conversations, and without a doubt, our singing. One of the biggest trends on the internet is hearing a Disney Princess sing her hit song with her own native finesse instead of a defaulted English one. Enjoy and really take notice on the differences in emphasis and fluidity of the lyrics. Because of changed language, the songs also have different lyrics to fit the melody which slightly alters the song even if it has a similar universal meaning. Disney is genius. What do you think?