3 years ago
onesmile
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Words that Don't Exist in English
After seeing a post about what new words should be added to the dictionary (http://www.vingle.net/posts/347854-Twictionary-Use-Twitter-to-Vote-for-the-Next-Collins-Dictionary-Word), I got to thinking about words that don't exist in English! So next time you're trying to describe something you can't quite find the word for while writing, give this list a look! This is an awesome list of 102 words in other languages that don't have an equivalent in English. I picked out a few of my favorites! "Shemomedjamo Georgian – You know when you’re really full, but your meal is just so delicious, you can’t stop eating it? The Georgians feel your pain. This word means, “I accidentally ate the whole thing.” (Another good reason to visit Georgia)" "Boketto Japanese – The act of gazing vacantly into the distance without thinking. (I guess some of you are feeling a bit Boketto about now)" "Tartle A Scottish verb meaning to hesitate while introducing someone due to having forgotten his/her name. (I’ve done this many a time without knowing it was a Tartle. Normally I think of a way to rephrase the sentence to avoid admitting I have forgotten their name)." I think Tartle might be my favorite! Which words on the list make you wish we had an English word to match the meaning?
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It's interesting that some of these are phrases, idioms if you will, as opposed to words so you might think there would be an equivalent in English, and yet there is not. Such as #26, l’appel du vide
@greggr When studying languages, I've always found the way that idioms are typically translated to a different idiom with a different literal meaning bjt similar feeling really interesting
@onesmile Indeed. But that's the joy of language, isn't it? That we can't always find the words to match the meaning of something, and so we must search for it amongst the words that we do know.
@onesmile being concise has never been the strong suit of English, I think. Like @greggr said, the words dont always exist, so we have to explain. Maybe we dont need to want to say it directly
I'm gonna need this dictionary please. And,ssssshhhhhhh, don't tell the English dictionary people about this!