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The Vocal Ranges of the Greatest Singers

From Mariah Carey's ear-piercing whistle to Barry White's deep bassy growl, compare the vocal ranges of today's top artists with the greatest of all time. Compare the vocal ranges of today’s top artists with the greatest of all time. This chart shows the highest and lowest notes each artist hit in the recording studio. Hover over the bars to see the songs on which they reached those notes. http://www.concerthotels.com/worlds-greatest-vocal-ranges?utm_content=bufferfb775&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer
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