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Michael Jackson Thriller PVC Action Figure | Shop For Gamers

Model Number:104602B1
Remote Control: No
Item Type: Model
Size:14cm
Puppets Type: Model
Completion Degree: Finished Goods
Brand Name: Flevans
Warning: not for children under 3 years
Soldier Accessories: Soldier Finished Product
Dimensions:14cm
Age Range: Grownups,> 14 Years old
Gender: Unisex
Commodity Attribute: Finished Goods
Version Type: Remastered Version
Original Package: Yes
Material: PVC
By Animation Source: Western Animation
Mfg Series Number: Model
Theme: Movie & TV
Condition: In-Stock Items

FREE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE Buy Now 33% Discount On Michael Jackson Thriller Action Figure Size 14cm Model Number 104602B1 Age Range 14 Years at Shop For Gamers.

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My 90s Toys Are Better Than Yours ;)
1) Polly Pocket Polly Pocket was seriously one of the best toys I ever had. I remember when I was a little girl, I stole one and I was too little to realize what I was doing. But I went home with a Polly Pocket and I was the happiest girl ever. Although I had an impressive world of Barbie dolls and Barbie things, I think I appreciated Polly Pocket the most -- probably because I was able to take it everywhere I went. And my imagination with wild with these toys. POLLY!!! 2) Tamagotchi Yess! I vividly remember having these in elementary school. I remember the teachers had to make the ban on them, because the students (including me) were HIGHLY addicted to them. They pooped, they slept, and they grew! Since it was like taking care of a real pet, you had to pay attention to them. If you ever ignored them for a long period of time, you came back to a shit mess, or sometimes they die. :( Can we please bring these back? 3) Bop It This is also on the list of one of the most addicting games ever. I am not even sure why I was so addicted to Bop It, but it was such an intriguing game. It's basically a memory toy. I would play this game hours on end. I remember even fighting with my sister for my turn to play the game. BOP IT! TWIST IT! PULL IT! 4) Easy Bake Oven Who was the best baker in the world? I WAS. This was the only time baking came easy. I can still remember the taste of the slightly-fake-tasting brownie. Every Time I used the toy, I definitely had to have my mother around to use it. Ever heard of the burning accidents from this toy -- I can totally believe. That Easy Bake Oven got hot. Brownies, anyone? 5) FURBY Goodness, this shit was scary. But I still played with it. During the day time I was in love with Furby, during the night time, I kept one eye open -- thanks to the 80s movie, Gremlins. And since Furby was technically a furry robot, it will go through it's weird tech-y things and do things on it's own. I still kinda like you, Furby. Kinda. 6) Super Soaker One of the COOLEST toys I had as a kid. This was freakin' fun as heck! And living in MIami where there was warm weather all year long, this toy came in handy. Who's going to get soaked today?! What kind of toys did you grow up having? My childhood was at its prime during the 1990s (I am an 80s baby!) Can I just please be a kid again???
A Famous Female Sculptor: Barbara Hepworth
Barbara Hepworth studied sculpture at the Royal College of Art along with Henry Moore. In 1928, Hepworth and Moore, along with her friend and fellow artist Richard Bedford, became the leaders of this new method of direct carving sculpture. In 1932, she and her then-husband Ben Nicholson mounted a sculpture exhibition declaring their move to abstraction and joined the group, Abstraction-Création, and became the driving force behind constructivism. When World War II hit London, Hepworth escaped to St. Ives in Cornwall, but she worked to form an artist group that brought international recognition to St. Ives artists after the war. Hepworth exhibited extensively and was committed to producing many public works, including One Shape for the United Nations in 1964. Barbara Hepworth sculpture for sale are available online. Her work included smooth curves and a creative exploration of negative space. Hepworth was born into a middle-class family in Wakefield, Yorkshire, at the turn of the century. Her father was a civil engineer who became a county surveyor. Barbara Hepworth artwork was obvious from the start and he received a scholarship to the Leeds School of Art in 1920. It was here that he met sculptor Henry Moore, perhaps the best known of contemporary artists of this era. There is no doubt that he was a great influence on his work, but it is likely that it was a two-way process. From here he won an additional scholarship to the Royal College of Art and received a diploma in 1923. The following year, Hepworth stayed to compete for the Prix de Rome. She lost to John Skeaping, who would become her husband. After a period in Italy, Hepworth and Skeaping returned to settle in London, where they both gained reputations and portfolios. Although the couple had a son, Paul, in 1929 their relationship failed to survive and they divorced in 1933. It was during this period that she met artist Ben Nicholson with whom she would eventually move to St Ives. In 1934, Hepworth and Nicholson became parents of triplets; Simon, Rachel, and Sarah Hepworth-Nicholson. Four years later the couple married and shortly after, with the outbreak of war, she moved to St Ive's, first settling in Carbis Bay. While Hepworth was largely concerned with family life, Nicholson became an influence for emerging local artists such as Peter Lanyon, Terry Frost, and John Wells, who formed the separatist Penwith Society of Artists. After this hiatus, Hepworth returned to the art world with a series of exhibitions and commissions in London. By the late 1940s, the relationship between her and Nicholson had begun to falter. In 1949 she purchased Trewyn Studio (now the Barbara Hepworth Museum) and moved there in 1950 and divorced Nicholson in 1951. Barbara Hepworth lived and worked at Trewyn Studio for the rest of her life and it was during this period that she produced most of her best-known works of hers. She found the studio inspiring, writing, 'Finding Trewyn Studio was a kind of magic, here was a studio, a patio and a garden where she could work outdoors and in space.' It was around this time that Barbara Hepworth began to move from her preferred medium of stone and wood towards the bronze that we most associate with her. Many of these castings still remain in St Ives, either at the Trewyn studio or at various locations in the city. The space provided by working outdoors also allowed her to scale up her work. In 1953, Hepworth's eldest son Paul was killed in a plane crash in Thailand while serving in the RAF. There is a moving monument in the chapel of the Madonna of the church of St Ia, Madonna and Child (Bianco del Mare) that Hepworth carved out of stone. During the 1960s, Hepworth consolidated his status as an internationally recognized artist with works such as "Single Form", whose casting is located outside the United Nations building in New York. This perforated shape is very representative of the style for which Hepworth is best known. Along with Henry Moore, it is Barbara Hepworth who can claim the influence of the hole in modern sculpture. Explore Barbara Hepworth sculptures and her other artwork in bidsquare which will make you amaze. In 1965, at the age of 62, Hepworth became Dame Barbara Hepworth (Commander of the British Empire) for her contribution to the contemporary art world. The same year she was also appointed a trustee of the Tate Gallery in London. Hepworth continued to work until the 1970s at the Trewyn studio. However, tragedy struck on May 20, 1975 when Hepworth died in a fire in her study, believed to have been caused by a cigarette that set her bedding on fire. She had been seriously ill for some time before her death, but the accident was a shock nonetheless. Barbara Hepworth is buried in Longstone Cemetery in Carbis Bay with a simple slate headstone marking her grave. To bid for the artworks of this artist, see the artist page of Barbara Hepworth in Bidsquare.
Michael Jackson Is Being Played By A White Man
Here's Joseph Fiennes. Actor Joseph Fiennes has been cast to play legendary pop star Michael Jackson in the upcoming British tv movie, "Elizabeth, Michael, and Marlon". The tv comedy is set for the Sky Art channel which has already taken plenty of heat following the casting. Fans are simply outraged calling this a racist and ignorant move on behalf of Sky Art. Fiennes is "shocked" to have landed the role but agrees that his skin pigmentation fits the part, "He was probably closer to my color than his original color." He continued, "But the writing is a delight. And the kind of interaction between the three of them is funny, and also full of pathos. It's people who are so iconic, but also can be detached. You know, you can get detached from society. So it's examining that kind of wonderful and mad detachment." Jackson would have probably been furious with this casting decision despite his white skin appearance due to vitiligo. In an 1993 interview with Oprah, he discussed his outrage over a Pepsi commercial that had a little white boy play him. Jackson's response, "That's the most ridiculous, horrifying story I've ever heard. It's crazy. I mean, why? Number one, it's my face as a child in the commercial. Me, when I was little. Why would I want a white child to play me? I'm a black American. I'm proud to be a black American. I am proud of my race. I am proud of who I am. I have a lot of pride in who I am and dignity." The comedy apparently is surrounded by a plot where Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Jackson, and Marlo Brando go on a journey to escape New York City to Ohio following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The tv film adaptation being made involving Fiennes is reportedly based on the real event. An excerpt statement released by Sky Art read, "It is part of a series of comedies about unlikely stories from arts and cultural history. Sky Arts gives producers the creative freedom to cast roles as they wish, within the diversity framework which we have set." Should Fiennes play the role?
[Pattern] Mr Tibbles the Cat
This pattern was created by http://www.ravelry.com/people/Claudia1980 The pattern consists of single crochet stitches (sc) and is crocheted in rows rather than in a spiral. Turn the work after each row. “sc2tog” means decreasing one stitch (st) by crocheting two stitches together. For this pattern, I used the invisible method for decreasing. There are plenty of instruction videos on YouTube, for instance this one. Yarn: Super fine, 40 grams (1.5 oz) Needle: 2.25 mm (US 1/B) Material: green felt; filling; black thread Ch. 40 R1: insert in 2nd st from hook, sc across (39) R2-3: ch 1, sc across (39) R4: ch 1, 32 sc, sc2tog (33) R5-7: ch 1, sc across (33) R8: ch 1, 31 sc, sc2tog (32) R9-11: ch 1, sc across (32) R12: ch 1, 30 sc, sc2tog (31) R13-15: ch 1, sc across (31) R16: ch1, 29 sc, sc2tog (30) R17-19: ch1, sc across (30) R20: ch1, 28 sc, sc2tog (29) R21-23: ch1, sc across (29) R24: ch1, 27 sc, sc2tog (28) R25-27: ch1, sc across (28) R28: ch1, 26 sc, sc2tog (27) R29-31: ch1, sc across (27) R32: ch1, 25 sc, sc2tog (26) R33-35: ch1, sc across (26) R36: ch1, 24 sc, sc2tog (25) R37-39: ch1, sc across (25) R40: ch1, 23 sc, sc2tog (24) R41-43: ch1, sc across (24) R44: ch1, 22 sc, sc2tog (23) R45-47: ch1, sc across (23) R48: ch1, 21 sc, sc2tog (22) R49-51: ch1, sc across (22) R52: ch1, 21 sc, 2 sc in last st (23) R53: ch1, 2 sc in 1st st, 22 sc (24) R54: ch1, 23 sc, 2 sc in last st (25) R55: ch1, 2 sc in 1st st, 24 sc (26) R56-74: ch1, sc across (26) R75: ch1, 8 sc (8) R76: ch1, sc2tog, 6 sc (7) R77: ch1, 5 sc, sc2tog (6) R78: ch1, sc2tog, 4 sc (5) R79: ch1, 3 sc, sc2tog (4) R80: ch1, sc2tog, 2 sc (3) R81: ch1, 1 sc, sc2tog (2) R82: ch1, sc across (2) Bind off. To finish off the other ear, reattach yarn to 19th st of row 74. R83: ch1, sc in same st as ch1, 7 sc (8) R84: ch1, 6 sc, sc2tog (7) R85: ch1, sc2tog, 5 sc (6) R86: ch1, 4 sc, sc2tog (5) R87: ch1, sc2tog, 3 sc (4) R88: ch1, 2 sc, sc2tog (3) R89: ch1, sc2tog, 1 sc (2) R90: ch1, sc across (2) Bind off. To finish off the tail, reattach yarn to 34th st of row 4. R91: ch1, sc in same st as ch1, 5 sc (6) R92: ch1, 5 sc (5) R93: ch1, sc across (5) R94: ch1, 4 sc, 2 sc in last st (6) R95: ch1, sc across (6) R96: ch1, 5 sc, 2 sc in last st (7) R97: ch1, sc across (7) R98: ch1, 6 sc, 2 sc in last st (8) R99: ch1, sc across (8) R100: ch1, 7 sc, 2 sc in last st (9) R101: ch1, sc across (9) R102: ch1, 8 sc, 2 sc in last st (10) R103-105: ch1, sc across (10) R106: ch1, 9 sc, 2 sc in last st (11) R107-109: ch1, sc across (11) R110: ch1, 10 sc, 2 sc in last st (12) R111-113: ch1, sc across (12) R114: ch1, 11 sc, 2 sc in last st (13) R115-121: ch1, sc across (13) R122: ch1, 11 sc, sc2tog (12) R123-125: ch1, sc across (12) R126: ch1, 10 sc, sc2tog (11) R127: ch1, sc across (11) R128: ch1, 9 sc, sc2tog (10) R129: ch1, sc2tog, 8 sc (9) R130: ch1, 7 sc, sc2tog (8) R131: ch1, sc2tog 3 times, 2 sc (5) Bind off and weave in all ends. Follow the same pattern to crochet another piece. Before sewing both pieces together, make a face using needle and black thread. To make a bow tie, see the instruction below, which is from the Lovesome Blog. Fasten the bow tie to the body with needle and thread. Next, sew both pieces together. I used the mattress stitch, which is a nice way of seaming without having to turn the work inside out. Make sure to stuff the tail while you can still reach inside. Stuff the entire cat before closing up. Finally, sew the bottom half of the tail to the body.
Barbie Scores Big Time With Zendaya Inspired Barbie Doll
Kudos to Mattel for recognizing true beauty. It wasn't that long ago that Zendaya was getting ridiculed for her 2015 Oscar's look consisting of a gorgeous dress and a head full of faux dreadlocks. While some believed the Disney star looked absolutely stunning, others including Giuliana Rancic [see clip here] had a lot to say. Rancic took to televisions popular Fashion Police mentioning that the young star "looked as if she'd smell like weed and patchouli oil" and let's just say the controversy was in the media for awhile. Zendaya was honored at the Rock 'N Royals concert this past Saturday benefitting VH1's Save The Music Foundation in Los Angeles. It's so amazing that it hasn't even been one full year since the comment sparked controversy and the creator of Barbie has taken a negative and turned it into a positive creating a replica Barbie of Zendaya's Oscar look. Talk about an amazing moment in history. There have been a couple previous African American women who had a Barbie created after them including both Brandy and Raven Symone, but there is something extremely liberating about this Zendaya Barbie. Maybe it's the fact that it's a way to say society doesn't know beauty or maybe it is a memorable reminder that with every negative comes a positive. According to Zendaya, the doll means so much more than just a commemoration of her popular outfit. She says, "When I was little, I couldn't find a Barbie that looked like me, my ... how times have changed."