3 years ago
caricakes
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The Smoking Bishop - Drinking in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol
I'm not the biggest fan of warm cocktails, but this recipe sounds so interesting! You'll need an oven and a lot of patience for this cocktail, just some forewarning. I loved this piece by Tori Avey about this concoction. The recipe follows :) "Alcohol flows freely in the writing of Charles Dickens. Though drinking was largely frowned upon in Victorian society, Dickens enjoyed drinking in moderation, and felt that nobody should begrudge the citizens of England this simple, age-old pleasure. Dickens was known to have a fondness for sweet alcoholic punches, which were quite popular at the time. One such drink, a mulled wine punch known as a Smoking Bishop, is mentioned in his timeless holiday classic, A Christmas Carol. “A merry Christmas, Bob!” said Scrooge, with an earnestness that could not be mistaken, as he clapped him on the back. “A merrier Christmas, Bob, my good fellow, than I have given you, for many a year! I’ll raise your salary, and endeavour to assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon, over a Christmas bowl of smoking bishop, Bob!” - Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol (1843) The Smoking Bishop is a classic example of a Victorian mulled punch. In Food and Cooking in Victorian England – A History, Andrea Broomfield discusses the history of this sweetly spiced wine beverage. “Its whimsical name recalled its medieval origins when it was sometimes served at guildhalls and university banquets in bowls that resembled a bishop’s miter. In keeping with the clerical theme, Victorians also enjoyed Smoking Pope made with burgundy, Smoking Cardinal made with Champagne or Rhine wine; Smoking Archbishop fortified with claret; and Smoking Beadle that called for raisins and ginger wine.” Here's the whole recipe - good luck! Recipe: 5 medium oranges 1 medium grapefruit 36 whole cloves 1 (750-milliliter) bottle medium-bodied red wine, such as Pinot Noir 1/2 cup granulated sugar 5 (3-inch) cinnamon sticks 2 star anise pods 1 (750-milliliter) bottle ruby port Heat the oven to 350°F and arrange a rack in the middle. Place the oranges and grapefruit in a baking dish and bake until the bottom is lightly browned. Flip the fruits over and continue baking until the second side looks the same. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Remove the fruit from the dish and stud each piece with 6 cloves. In another dish, place the red wine, sugar, cinnamon sticks, and star anise in a large saucepan over low heat. Stir until sugar dissolves. Add the clove-studded fruit by submerging it in the wine mixture. Cover and let it sit overnight. Then, remove the fruit from the saucepan and slice each piece in half. Juice the other halves into a strainer. Discard seeds, cloves, and pulp. Add the juice and port to the mixture and stir. Place over low heat but don’t let it boil. You can remove the star anise and cinnamon sticks if you want. Best served hot.
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