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How A Song Becomes An Anthem - Stromae Meets the Red Devils

It's official. I am completely obsessed with Stromae. He takes all of that old horrible Europop that gets stuck in your head, and makes is fantastic. He's got a style all his own and a personality to match! Watch as he tries to convince the Belgian football team, the Red Devils, to adopt his song Ta Fete as their World Cup anthem. He's hilarious and so talented. Check out his entire album - Racine Carree.
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This Means So Much: Chile's Copa America win goes beyond sport
I am not Chilean, and I don't pretend to be. But that doesn't mean I can't hold allegiance to Chile. I spent six months there last year - a long time in the life of a 21-year-old - and, thanks to the people that I met, developed a legitimate sense of belonging in Santiago. I lived with Chileans. I went to school with Chileans. I went drinking, and hiking, and rock climbing, and bike riding, and shopping with Chileans. I am not Chilean, but, for those six months, that was easy to forget. When you send - no, throw - yourself into a foreign place for an extended period of time and provide yourself with essentially no outlet to the life that you've known for twenty years, you learn things. When your daily interactions are with people who have experiences and histories so dramatically different than your own, you learn about these experiences and histories, and you begin to feel, in small ways, that they belong to you, too. When you watch the national soccer team fall to big-bad Brazil, twice hitting the post in uniquely Chilean, heartbreaking fashion, you come to realize that the sort of national bad luck that Chileans refer to may hold some tragic water, and you come to realize how much this sport means to people. When you cover your nose and mouth from the July smog, when you grow frustrated with bureaucratic inconsistencies, when you unsuspectingly ride your bike through the Molotov-cocktail-stained black streets of a protest and get nailed with tear gas, you begin to understand what it means to be a Santiaguino. When you remember all this and look out your window in the morning and gasp at the breathtaking Andes looming, you know. At that point, it doesn't matter if you've lived there for six months or six lifetimes. When you have one the most honest conversations of your life with the woman who did more for you in your six months than you can attempt to relate in words or images - not to mention giving you a bed, food, and invaluable access and welcoming into a family - you listen to it in a way you didn't know you were capable; you listen, and you remember. When Ximena tells you why she will never return to the Estadio Nacional, the sports complex in the middle of Santiago that contains the soccer pitch where Chile beat Argentina on penalties this weekend to win Copa América - Chile's first ever major international championship - you remember it. And you share the pain and sorrow, as well as you can manage. Ximena will never return to Estadio Nacional because she was there, once, in 1973. She was fortunate to be on the outside, perilously looking in; had she been on the other side of its doors, she may not have reemerged. On September 4, 1970, socialist candidate Salvador Allende was democratically elected as president of Chile. On September 11, 1973, Allende died under mysterious circumstances after delivering his very last speech, in the face of a brutal coup d'etat by General Augusto Pinochet and a junta of right-wing economists and military leaders. Pinochet would hold the position of dictator until 1990. In those seventeen years, an estimated 3,000 Chileans were executed or declared 'disappeared', and another 200,000 were exiled. Those tortured, humiliated and murdered were everything from left-wing politicians to artists to intellectuals to musicians to young students. These izquierdistas were captured from their families, often without notice and brought to detention centers all along the long, thin coastal nation. Some of these centers still stand today, including the harrowing Villa Grimaldi (pictured above), which lies in the outskirts of a wealthy neighborhood of Santiago. It's a museum, now, and a visit leaves a lump in your throat twice the size of an apple. The lump stays with you well after you exit its gate, occupying a place in your heart that will never be overtaken. The thick, original padlock from its days as a torture center still remains on the door, symbolically locked shut forever. A visit to the national cemetery, also in Santiago, has a similarly chilling effect. Allende's tombstone and the plaque that sits next to it, chronicling part of his final speech, stand out, but not more so than the thousands of graves that do not exist, and never will. These desaparecidos are commemorated on a much-too-large wall at the cemetery's exit. The wall, too, leaves a lump inside you. Some words from Allende's final speech: "Trabajadores de mi Patria, tengo fe en Chile y su destino. Superarán otros hombres de este momento gris y amargo en el que la traición pretende imponerse. Sigan ustedes sabiendo que, mucho más temprano que tarde, de nuevo se abrirán las grandes alamedas por donde pase el hombre libre, para construir una sociedad mejor. ¡Viva Chile! ¡Viva el pueblo! ¡Vivan los trabajadores!" "Workers of my country, I have faith in Chile and its destiny. Men will overcome this dark and bitter moment when treason seeks to prevail. Go forward knowing that, sooner rather than later, the great avenues will open again where free men will walk to build a better society. Long live Chile! Long live the people! Long live the workers!" Estadio Nacional was, unthinkably, used by Pinochet and the persecutors of the dictatorship's terror as a detention center. A prison. A torture den. And on Saturday, the Chilean national team won a match there that comes as close as anything ever has at appeasing the tragedies of the 1970s. Any Chilean you speak to who was alive in the '70s will have a story of their experience. Many were exiled, and later returned. Many went far, far away, and will never come back. Some have relatives that were abducted. Others no longer speak to their families - differences in opinion regarding the coup are too extreme to be ameliorated, even forty years later. Some, like Ximena, ran away from home as a teenager in '73, appalled at her mother's support for Pinochet's coup and madly in love with a man with similar troubles. While some are capable of forgiveness - Ximena and her mother see one another often, now - others cannot fathom the meaning of the word. The stains are too deep, for many. Estadio Nacional stands today as it did when Pinochet exploited it as a symbol of his power. Off the side of a busy avenue, the unknown behind its walls and fences struck unspeakable fear into Chileans, desperate to know what had come of their disappeared loved ones. It was as visible as anything, yet there are very few accounts explaining what actually went on, or who was taken, or whether or not they ever left. There are few records; there is extraordinary memory. Each time the stadium packs full, a small section is left empty. "Un pueblo sin memoria es un pueblo sin futuro," a sign reads. "A people without memory is a people without future." But there's no concern here that Chileans will forget. Remembering is part -- the part, perhaps -- of the Chilean experience. And this focus on memory is part of what made the victory in the Copa América so special. Chileans remember the match against Brazil last June. They remember that this group of Chilean players is labeled the "Golden Generation" - it's the best team they've ever had, and it represents the best chance they've ever had at winning a major title. They remember that the tournament is being played at home in Chile. They remember what went on in the arena that was to host the final. But the cynicism that is so natural to most Chileans would have told them that something would've gone wrong in the tournament. It seemed it might when start Arturo Vidal was involved in a drunk driving accident in the group stages, but the team rallied behind his continued presence in the team. Chances seemed slim throughout a brutal, physical affair with Uruguay in the quarterfinals, a match that was marred with controversy, but Chile fought harder and earned their win. When spirited Peru, playing down a man, equalized in the second half, there were fears that it would all come crashing down at the hands of their biggest rival, but Edu Vargas responded with a goal for the ages. When Argentina clobbered Paraguay to set up a match with Chile in the final, victory seemed improbable. Up and down the team sheets, Argentina are better than Chile. When they battled for 120 minutes and readied themselves for penalties, the cynicism perked up again, and the nation remembered the penalty shootout that crushed their dreams against Brazil in the World Cup. The win means so much to a nation plagued by bad luck - in the forms ranging from Pinochet's rule (though luck does no justice for what occurred), to missed penalty kicks, to crippling, unpredictable earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and, perhaps most famously, the entrapment of 33 miners for more than two months. The win goes beyond the score, the way the game was played, and the sport as a whole. This is a unifying event for Chileans all around the world - including those who will never return following their exile, and those of us who borrowed the nation, its culture and its amazing people for only a short time. I maintain my U.S. passport; that won't change. I may speak Spanish with a surprising Chilean accent, but that does not make me Chilean. I may have memories like the ones I've written about above, but those don't serve to change my nationality, either. I may have shared the agonizing defeat to Brazil in 2014, but that does not mean I share the memory of two decades of unjust political and social oppression. I do not have memories of that. But I do have understanding; I do have empathy; I do relate; I do recognize; I do smile; I do remember. I do reach out to Chilean friends and near-family, and they do appreciate it, because they know, better than I do, what it means. And when it means that much, maybe knowing that there's a kid sitting in New York thinking of them helps it mean even just a drop more.
Wedding Band vs DJ (Which Is Better?)
We love both bands and DJs and think there is a place for both of them to create an awesome party for any wedding or event. But if you only have the budget or space for one of them, which are you supposed to choose? Your Budget One thing we can't ignore is how much cheaper DJs are compared to wedding bands. If you are think about hiring a band or a DJ for a wedding and aren't sure which to pick, it's a good idea to think about what budget you have. Of course, DJs are usually solo performers and would command a much lower fee than a larger group of musicians. Wedding Venue Space If space is an issue, a DJ could also be the optimal choice. Their set up is usually much smaller and easier to fit in at most wedding venues. However, a full band set up can look incredible if you have the space for it. It really is a spectacle to see a band set up properly and decked out with guitars, drums, speakers and microphones! A scene like this creates a buzz in the room and gets your guests ready for a party. Sound Limiter Friendly These devices are becoming more and more common across wedding venues around the UK. Essentially, a wedding venue sound limiter will cut power to the stage or wedding musicians if the performance breaches a certain decibel level. As you can imagine, this can be quite a problem for couples who want a rocking live wedding band at their party. DJs are able to alter the volume of their entertainment much easier than a live band. Some wedding bands can work with sound limiters by performing with electric drum kits and different instruments, but it can have a negative effect on the energy of the performance. It's worth checking with your venue what the sound limit is set to before making your decision! Song Requests Another plus for the DJ column is the ability to deal with almost any song requests. The repertoire of a DJ is huge compared to that of a band. This is great if you are wanting a really wide variety of songs to dance to on your wedding night. Whilst a band can only play a certain amount of songs live, it is absolutely incredible to hear them performed by talented musicians. If you have a first dance request or a special song you'd love to hear on your wedding night, hearing it sung by live musicians makes that moment even more special!
Business lawyers for California & San Diego
To obtain the benefit of the late-discovery exception to the provisions of CCP § 338, setting forth a three-year limitation for the bringing of actions grounded on fraud or mistake or on the official bond of a public official, the complaint must allege facts showing that the cause of action could not with reasonable diligence have been discovered prior to three years before the suit. Silver v. Watson (CalifLaw 2d Dist. July 26, 1972), 26 CalifLaw 3d 905, 103 Cal. Rptr. 576, 1972 CalifLawCALIFLAW 994. Nakase law wade business law lawyer knows the litigations. Liability on Official Bonds The statute of limitations commences to run against a cause of action upon a county treasurer’s official bond arising out of neglect of his official duty to keep the county funds under his personal control at least as early as knowledge of such breach of duty is obtained by the county. County of San Diego v. Dauer (Cal. Dec. 29, 1900), 131 Cal. 199, 63 P. 338, 1900 Cal. CALIFLAW 762. Without regard to the form of action, a surety sued upon the bond of a public officer may successfully plead subd 1if the action has been commenced after the lapse of three years following, not the discovery, but the misfeasance or malfeasance itself of the officer. Sonoma County v. Hall (Cal. May 1, 1901), 132 Cal. 589, 65 P. 12, 65 P. 459, 1901 Cal. CALIFLAW 1104, modified, (Cal. June 4, 1901), 65 P. 459, overruled, Regents of University of Cal. v. Hartford Acci. & Indem. Co. (Cal. July 13, 1978), 21 Cal. 3d 624, 147 Cal. Rptr. 486, 581 P.2d 197, 1978 Cal. CALIFLAW 253; Norton v. Title Guaranty & Surety Co. (Cal. Sept. 25, 1917), 176 Cal. 212, 168 P. 16, 1917 Cal. CALIFLAW 497; Hellwig v. Title Guaranty & Surety Co. (CalifLaw Jan. 21, 1919), 39 CalifLaw 422, 179 P. 222, 1919 CalifLawCALIFLAW 191; United Bank & Trust Co. v. Fidelity & Deposit Co. (Cal. June 30, 1928), 204 Cal. 460, 268 P. 907, 1928 Cal. CALIFLAW 705; Anderson v. Shaffer (CalifLaw Apr. 23, 1929), 98 CalifLaw 457, 277 P. 185, 1929 CalifLawCALIFLAW 730, overruled, Regents of University of Cal. v. Hartford Acci. & Indem. Co. (Cal. July 13, 1978), 21 Cal. 3d 624, 147 Cal. Rptr. 486, 581 P.2d 197, 1978 Cal. CALIFLAW 253; Haswell v. Costellenos (CalifLaw Sept. 28, 1932), 126 CalifLaw 427, 14 P.2d 846, 1932 CalifLawCALIFLAW 442. Guardian’s action on former tax collector’s bond which arose in 1938 was barred by three-year statute of limitations, where it was not commenced until more than twenty years thereafter, since evidence showed ward was not mentally incompetent or insane during three-year period following transaction giving rise to cause of action. Phillips v. Standard Acci. Ins. Co. (CalifLaw 1st Dist. Apr. 29, 1960), 180 CalifLaw 2d 474, 4 Cal. Rptr. 277, 1960 CalifLawCALIFLAW 2363. Pension and Retirement Rights Trial court properly found plaintiff’s claims challenging the payment of increased public employee pension benefits barred by the statute of limitations. The continuous accrual doctrine did not trigger a new limitations period every time retirement benefits were paid pursuant to the increased pension benefits approved in 2002 and 2003. Luke v. Sonoma County (CalifLaw 1st Dist. Dec. 12, 2019), 256 Cal. Rptr. 3d 489, 43 CalifLaw 5th 301, 2019 CalifLawCALIFLAW 1243.
French Songs!?!?!? Maitre Gims
Brisé I cam across this song on smule and it got me. like holy hell it's good. So I looked for the song on YouTube. Est-Ce Que Tu M'aimes? After the first song I found this one. So amazing! Zombie Last song that I fell in love with was this. Why do all these songs just play perfectly hits eBay is going on in my mind right now. I know it's not Kpop but I'm tagging my tag list and sharing this....I like it but of course you don't have to. But it's freaking french!!! more languages that I wanted to learn but never was motivated until this last year. @Nikolmaii @Mikim000 @MichelleRosa @Valerie816 @Falselove @SherrySahar @Tigerlily84 @AimeeH @DekaraMiller @Christianliu @SugaOnTop @gyapittman @BelencitaGarcia @StefaniTre @SierraBecerra @VeronicaArtino @jojojordy2324 @Emealia @SugalessJams @applecake452 @ChelseaAustin @sarahdarwish @QueenLee @DestinaByrd @XergaB20 @Starbell808 @jjrockstar @DesireeChucklez @MalihaAhmed @shelbiisonfire @KarlythePanda66 @KoreanDramaMaMa @thePinkPrincess @justcallmekyki @OhItsJas@Izzy987 @AshleyAndino @tinathellama @Nikolmaii @NicoleJolly @Gaehwa @funfunbunbun @Choijiah @michievip @Ilikepancakes @JasminMartinez @MichelleIbarra @sutcheks3 @MrsChanyeol @KellyOconnor @LemonLassie @MalihaAhmend @VKookie47 @Starbell808 @MomoChamie @ninjamidori @jessicacheung97 @MsLoyalHeart @terenailyn @megancurrent9 @tinathellama @saraortiz2002 @anarose @CreeTheOtaku @DeyaniraEstrada @drummergirl691 @yaya12 @ReynadeKpop @VIPFreak2NE1 @KaitlynHewitt @Ercurrent @KendraReeve @usagichan20104 @torchix @funfunbunbun @Choijiah @TesneemElAlami @shellyfuentes70 @KrystaDaricek @staceyholley @tiffany1922 @VikaAlex @Alyessiazavala @luna1171 @Maddie27 @wordlesseyes @Msrayray95 @DawanaMason @ilikepancakes @UnnieCakesAli @KaeliShearer @QueenLele @Zephoria @OliviaZenger @21francoamberco @jessicacheung97 @ValerieAlissaPa @MadAndrea @CamrynCherry @Defy24601 @SindyHernandez @EniorehFrancois @LaurenDimalanta @merryjayne13 @Eliortiz13 @priscy513 @JinsPrincess86 @PatriciaS @KarolinaTrevino @fionafifimonkey @Princess2328 @BulletproofV @4dalientae @TracyLynnn @mellyortiz @Eliortiz13 @Jinnyrod3 @KassieXiong @BridgetJara @disorono @summerblack2 @Orihemay @yaya12 @raenel @kpossible4250 @ammagrande @HyunnieKim @IsisMayaVelasco @elizabeth1234 @DonnaLykaRoxas @heidichiesa @Gladness @kmayong @SugaMint @kcastaneda170 @themrshongki @MichelleMonroe @KatiePrihodiko @AyameTenchu @Nikolmaii @mrsjeon @szewwy @lashonda0917 @KristinaCaron @KayLeeRose94 @AmiArt @anarose @aliahwhbmida @Ivonvons @lashonda0917 @hyunsaeng638 @aliahwhbmida @ParkHwaYoung @narutobandgeek @RKA916 @Sugajin94 @LysetteMartinez @RandomName @MelissaGarza @Kiyofugi @ChelseaJay @MaritessSison @inuyashagal @Princessunicorn @Gaehwa @NicoleJolly @tinathellama @CindyHolguin @PatriciaS @KatiePrihodiko @shellyfuentes70 @HayleyEastman