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Pixar changed multiple scenes in 'Inside Out' to cater to International Audiences
What you see depends on the country you live in. If you walk into a movie theater somewhere else in the world, Pixar's 'Inside Out' may look a little different from the American version you saw back at home. From the food to the sports to the cultural mannerisms, some things are slightly different. Pixar created 28 graphics for 45 uniquely different shots to be inserted for local audiences. So far Pixar has made over $553 million to date spanning multiple countries across the world. Director Pete Docter said they wanted the film to remain complex and emotional while making sense with the foreign audience's culture. Sometimes Pixar films aren't strictly perfect domestically so they make some tweaks to create the best product. This isn't the first company to change it's movie for a foreign audience. Marvel with "Iron Man 3" added scenes for Chinese audiences to incorporate Gu Li Duo, a popular Chinese milk drink, and a scene where Iron Man is saved by a famous Chinese character. In Adam Sandler's "Pixels", a scene was taken out so that Chinese audiences would not see the Great Wall of China destroyed. As you can see, your country has a huge influence. Doctor said for 'Inside Out', “We learned that some of our content wouldn’t make sense in other countries. For example, in Japan, broccoli is not considered gross. Kids love it. So we asked them, ‘What’s gross to you?’ They said green bell peppers, so we remodeled and reanimated three separate scenes replacing our broccoli with green peppers.” In this scene, Riley's dad is having a hard time getting her to eat broccoli. She squirms and turns away in disgust as he continuously attempts to have her eat it. In the United States, it is a normal thing for a child to dislike broccoli. But in Japan, broccoli is substituted by bell peppers since Japanese children think those are gross instead. That slight cultural difference changed an entire scene in the film to be more relatable and to evoke EMOTION. Though Hockey is traditionally a Canadian pastime, Hockey is still largely popular in the northern parts of the United States such as US state, Minnesota. Hockey is still just as American for many people however most of the world isn't exposed to hockey frequently which is why Pixar changed it to soccer. Soccer is the world's most popular sport. Docter also mentioned,“We offered a version with soccer instead of hockey since soccer is huge in so many parts of the world. But some countries that are into soccer actually decided to stick with hockey since the characters in the movie are from Minnesota and it makes sense that they’d be hockey fans.” Did you know that even how we read words is different in various parts of the world? Well Pixar took note of that being noted by Docter, "Bing Bong reads a sign in the film to Joy and Sadness. He points at the letters, D-A-N-G-E-R, saying ‘it’s a shortcut.’ Not only did we translate the sign, but we even went so far as to reanimate Bing Bong so that he points to the letters from right to left, instead of left to right to accommodate certain languages.” Do you think it's necessary to change a movie for a foreign audience?
Disney Princesses Singing In Their Native Languages
English is not the native tongue of Disney Princesses. Everyone has grown up with Disney Princesses because they are the most innocent form of childhood entertainment. With the fantastic movies comes even better songs which make them so appealing. Your infatuation with them carries on into adulthood and before you know it, you're sitting in your living room watching the movies singing along with your own children. Crazy right? Well, here's the thing, English is the default language, not the native one. All Disney Princesses have come from other countries other than Pocahontas who was a Native American in North America (present day USA). It brings up a really interesting change because when you watch the Disney movies in their native languages, it has an entirely new meaning because it's authentically and historically correct. Disney Americanizes our movies through using English and we forget that languages play a huge role in presenting emotions, interactions, conversations, and without a doubt, our singing. One of the biggest trends on the internet is hearing a Disney Princess sing her hit song with her own native finesse instead of a defaulted English one. Enjoy and really take notice on the differences in emphasis and fluidity of the lyrics. Because of changed language, the songs also have different lyrics to fit the melody which slightly alters the song even if it has a similar universal meaning. Disney is genius. What do you think?
Viral Star "Damn Daniel" Meets Ellen
Daaaaaaaamn Daniel. If you haven't seen the viral video of the newly famed star "Damn Daniel" then you're probably living off the grid. With a hilarious voice coming from high school sophomore Josh Holz, he has been making hilarious vines of his friend, Daniel Lara. Daniel is only 14 years old and a freshman at Riverside Poly High School, CA. The young heart throb is now raking in thousands of fans across social media attracting super-fandom overnight. Hundreds of crazy rumors have flooded the web, everything from Daniel being attacked to he's in hiding. Everyone is just looking for a story to add to the media craze. There are currently a pair of white vans online selling for $300,000 hoping to get someone gullible enough to buy them. This quick rise to fame though hasn't come without consequences. A recent news article hit that fans are pranking and storming Holz's home in California to get a glimpse of the kid behind the voice. The vine has also led to some negative parodies online which have garnered some heat. Of course it was a given that "Damn Daniel" and the voice behind it would appear on The Ellen Show. After a hilarious interview between Ellen and the boys, she surprised them with gifts. For Holz, she gave him an epic and brand new surfboard to commemorate his visit to the show. However, Damn Daniel was the one who truly came home with a winning prize by receiving a lifetime supply of Vans shoes thanks to Ellen partnering with Vans HQ. Talk about an awesome gift! "Back at it again with the white vans!"
Collection of Late Philanthropist Don Marron
The Wall Street Journal described three New York galleries as "longtime rivals" for selling the collection of late philanthropist Donald Marron. Pace, Gagosian, and Acquavella planned to privately sell over 300 works totaling US $450 million. Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Ed Ruscha, etc. are among the artists included. How exactly the trio managed to pull it off, particularly with competition from Sotheby’s, Christie’s, and Phillips, may never be public knowledge. “The joy of private sales,” quipped Pace president Marc Glimcher. Many in the industry were surprised by this agreement. In recent news reports, three prominent auction houses were reported to have engaged in aggressive negotiations. The Wall Street Journal report noted that the houses guaranteed that at least $300 million would be paid for the paintings by Donald Marron's widow, Catie Marron. The auction house may be assertive because of its new owner, Patrick Dahi, and the need to make a big splash in its first year. Michael Plummer, the co-founder of Arvest Partners, saw potential in a Christie's partnership. According to a report that cites Pinault, "We know [Christie's owner François] and his family like taking risks on big deals." There are good reasons for the auction houses to be aggressive. According to Artnet Analytics, 35% fewer lots crossed the auction block in 2013 with an estimate above $10 million than in 2012. Additionally, many are concerned that Brexit, Coronavirus, and the upcoming US elections will continue to impact markets. The three New York galleries who won the rights to the collection are framing it as a critique of the auction model, which will make matters worse for auction houses. Glimcher said one of the main reasons the trio teamed up was to "make a point" about how galleries can compete with auction houses. Glimcher told the Wall Street Journal that the talk about numbers and bidding was uninspiring to [Catie Marron's widow]. “Private sales are private, and sometimes that’s an advantage.” A previous report from Artnet highlighted the conceivable procurement of Donald Marron's assortment by a significant sales management firm as motivation to anticipate a turnaround "from a genuinely fair 2019." Now, those expectations lie in the assortment of land big shots Harry and Linda Macklowe, whose separate from procedures prompted a court-requested offer of their assortment, worth an expected $700 million. Artnet anticipates that those pieces should go to sell as right on time as spring. In the interim, Pace, Gagosian, and Acquavella get ready for the offer of Don Marron's 300+ piece assortment. The threesome will have an occasion on April 24th, observing Marron's achievement. In spite of the fact that it is indistinct which compositions or drawings will feature the occasion. Furthermore, the exhibitions likewise are not precluding the chance of selling a few pieces before that date. They can't bear to sell the assortment gradually. Among a couple of subtleties, we think about the association is that Pace, Gagosian, and Acquavella consented to purchase any piece from Catie Marron that they can't sell. "It was a large chunk of change, so we need to convey—we can't send any works back to her," Bill Acquavella of Acquavella Galleries told the Wall Street Journal. Be that as it may, while it is a tumultuous time for the exhibitions, it is additionally a significant second to respect the memory of Don Marron. Marron established the Wall Street firm D.B. Marron and Co. in 1959. His initial gathering enthusiasm lay in Hudson River compositions. In any case, he developed to see the value in more present-day pieces as time passed by. He proceeded to assist PaineWebber for more than 20 years with their assortment as the organization's administrator. What's more, he filled in as the leader of the Museum of Modern Art, where he likewise gave pieces from his assortment. He passed on of a coronary failure last December, matured 85. Media Source: AuctionDaily