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Emojis Are Not Made The Same
Not all devices are alike. Apple, Android, and Windows, to name a few, are very different operating systems and that key difference also makes for very different variations of emojis. The most popularized Unicode Consortium, or the body that selects which emojis will make their public debut, is the Apple version. They are used in marketing campaigns, commercials, apps, texting, food delivery, etc. However operating systems like iOS, Android, Windows, Blackberry, Samsung, LG, etc. don't always have the same variations of emojis that the general public is accustomed to. This leads to an ultimate dilemma, emojis are basically a language all their own and somehow they are getting lost in digital translation. Thanks to Yahoo tech, a comprised list of varied emojis from device to device: 1. Woman With Bunny Ears You may recognize this emoji normally as the Bunny twins, tap-dancing girls, showgirls, or any of the other various nicknames. However when you transfer over to Android, you'll be in a surprise that the emoji becomes a yellow gumdrop looking face with a brown wig and bunny ears. The dynamic duo is no longer, which probably leads to some confusion at Halloween for Android users who are curious as to when there was an emoji of two Woman With Bunny Ears. 2. Colored Hearts This one is all about design. Apple keeps the hearts very uniform, vibrantly colored, and as basic as can be. For Android, the emojis hold a lot more meaning while also being somewhat cheesy. There is practically no color variation and I don't even know what to think about the fuzzy heart. Emojis are supposed to be playful and I think Android really missed the boat on this one. 3. Watch Obviously iOS looks classier but I am definitely a bigger fan of Android for some reason. I think sometimes less is more and I think it translates well in this instance. After all, a watch is a universal symbol so it's really hard to mess that up between devices. If anything, the emojis from device to device just show a different kind of watch that is solely exclusive to it's own device which seems cool in this example. 4. Eggplant You know exactly what this means if it's sent in iMessage. And you know exactly how hilarious this emoji can be because let's be honest, there is really no everyday use for an eggplant so you might as well spice it up a bit if you know what I'm aiming at. Now as for Android, it's a poor example of an eggplant to begin with but there is no way that it'd ever be used for alternative purposes within messaging. Just no way. 5. Slice of Pizza Okay Android wins on this one. The iOS version looks like a horribly designed emoji that is trying way too hard to be life-like. I appreciate the pic-art look of Android's emoji in this comparison. However, Dominos Pizza is using the iOS emoji in their brand as you can order a pizza now just sending that emoji. After all, that's pretty clever but the pizza emoji could get a generic facelift. 6. Rowboat This is a BIG difference. iOS looks certainly more appropriate and attractive on an interface. The Android immediately signals a date instance which could be totally misconstrued. Also Android needs to keep up with the times as emojis no longer have one option -- with LGBT and racial skin tones being introduced, their emojis need to be updated. Emojis are great because they include everyone and the rowboat needs the same. 7. Glowing Heart Either way, they both accurately depict what you're trying to show. Personally I like the iOS version more however the Android heart isn't horrible. A heart is a heart no matter how you dress it up. Good work to both. 8. Pistol/Gun Windows is the only operating system that doesn't include a gun that looks like iOS. Instead they've opted for a less serious space gun that could easily be more appropriate for Star Trek than anything else. With weapon emojis being taken more and more serious in the media, Windows will have to figure out how to not cause any trouble for its users who may be using their version of the gun emoji playfully while it will be translated into a more serious message. 9. Love Hotel Well to be honest, I've thought the 'H' on iOS stood for hospital and the heart symboled health. Apparently that's the exact opposite of what it meant. Windows does a much better job at representing this but they are both confusing. It wouldn't have killed them to spell out "hotel" on the building, you know. 10. Mobile Phone We get it, you love your own phone. 11. Donut Hmmm these are all very stereotypical of the interface they appear on. To be honest, Windows looks the least like a donut and I personally am not a fan. Android does a pretty good job and iOS is the most life like. I guess this one boils down to pure preference but it should be understood between each device fairly easily. I guess Windows doesn't like chocolate frosting. 12. Alien Monster Well these have very different connotations from the get-go. For iOS, most believe this emoji is a representation of an arcade game that you use with a joystick. For Android, however, it's actually alien monster that looks like an evil version of Pearl from Finding Nemo creepily ready to say "Awww you guys made me ink muhahahahahha!". We have an alien emoji already in iOS, why do we need this one? 13. Tennis Either way, they fit the bill and do a nice job at symbolizing. 10 for 10 on both.
9 Advertisements Probably Made By 'Cool Dads'
Advertising is quite the competitive field. You've got to be a strong communicator, someone creative, someone who has their finger on the pulse of all the up-and-coming trends. But for every catchy jingle, winning slogan, or hilarious campaign, there's about a dozen horrible, cringe-worthy attempts at - frankly - trying to make 'fetch' happen. It's almost like the advertising world is overrun with 'cool Dads'. (No offense to Vingle dads, who are as cool as they come. Obviously.) To show you guys exactly what I mean, I've decided to share 9 different so-tryhard-it's-embarrassing advertisements. You homies better know what I'm sayin'. "It's the year 2015, guys. Let's update the name of our Meatlover's Pizza with something more current. You know, something that'll resonate with the kids today." "I know. How about... EPIC MEATZ?" "Okay, so, let's create a sign that tells people using our rec center where to put used towels. But in a way that, you know, really speaks to the kids." "I know! We'll use that song all the kids on Vine are twerking to these days." "The University of Cincinnati needs us, everyone. How do we get the kids off their Twitters and into their top-ranking business school?" "No one turns down the chance to be... MBAWESOME." "We've got a new client. Owns a taco shop. He's looking for a hashtag, wants to go viral. What do you think, Cool Dad?" "Uh... #TacosFTW. Obviously." I HAVE NO JOKE TO MAKE FOR THIS ONE. THE SECOND-HAND EMBARRASSMENT IS BURNING THROUGH MY RETINAS. "Cool Dad, Target is about to get a shipment of the 20th anniversary remaster of 'The Truth About Cats And Dogs'. How do we make Janeane Garofalo relevant again?" "Don't worry. I got this. LOL." "Alright, Smirnoff advertising team. We're losing the Millennial market to Ciroc. How do we show kids we can be cool too, but without breaking #NetflixAndChill's implied copyright?" "How's about a little #StreamAndHang, homie?" "Quick, Cool Dad. Taco Bell needs a hip and current package design that illustrates how delicious their chicken quesadillaz are." "TACO BELL. I CAN'T EVEN RIGHT NOW." "So, Cool Dad, I'm sorry you've been demoted to Fortune Cookie writer, but we think you've got a skill, sir. You really know how to speak to the younger generation." [Insert Cool Dad being too busy writing EPIC FORTUNEZ to respond.] I hope all my bruhs here on Vingle found this card funny AF. Have you seen any epically dank advertisementz lately?
Graphic Design Tip: How to Brainstorm an Effective Logo
Before I started going to art school, my parents (as a lot of parents do) really overestimated my own abilities. During my high school years, they launched their own non-profit organization for breast cancer advocacy, where the entire group was essentially run out of a room of our house. My father was in charge of building the website and making sure that it ran smoothly. My mother was the spokesperson, often attending various conventions and symposiums to address those in the medical field about breast cancer and HER2+, a more aggressive expression. Launching the group was running quite smoothly until my parents approached me with a favor. They wanted me to design their logo. Andddd it didn't go so well. They gave up and found a professional. Fast forward to my life after art school, and I'm looking back at my high school years wishing I could have helped teenage me come up with a great logo design. While creating a logo is not as easy as it looks, it really is perhaps one of my favorite design challenges. There is a lot to consider when you're making a logo, and I've decided that it might be helpful to make a simplified list for all of you Vingle designers so that you can go out into the branding world and create beautiful things! 1. Keep it simple. As fun as it is to be given the opportunity to really utilize your creative side, it really isn't the appropriate time to start busting out all of those fancy and elaborate tricks you might have learned doing other projects. Creating a visually 'busy' logo is just not effective marketing. 2. Keep in mind that you're creating a symbol to represent a company. It can be pretty direct symbolism, ie: the apple logo for Apple or the red cross for American Red Cross, or it can be more abstract, similar to the Nike swoosh. Another popular logo option is to reduce down to a strictly typographic design. Disney or Kellogg's is a good example of effective typographic logos. Get creative, but keep it simple. My favorite example of balance between creativity and minimalism is the FedEx logo. Have you ever noticed there's an arrow between the E and the X? 3. Do your research. Before thumbnailing your own logo ideas, think of all of the logos you've seen that really caught your attention. Even try drawing them out freehand. Look up interviews with the advertising designers behind some of the world's most famous logos. I would recommend "To Inform and Delight", a documentary about Milton Glaser, the artist who designed the I♥NY logo. 4. When you're finally ready, begin making a list of all the descriptive words you associate with the company and how you want your audience to feel when looking at your logo, like 'friendly' or 'sophisticated'. Then think about your nouns. When you think about your company, what images come to mind? If you were creating a logo for Tropicana Orange Juice, for example, maybe the first thing you think of is a tree or an orange or a glass. Try to think of as many nouns as possible, as these will definitely help you when you start putting pencil to paper. 4. USE YOUR SKETCHBOOK. I can't stress the importance of this. I feel like a lot of artists go straight to their laptops and begin working on Photoshop or Illustrator over working on actual thumbnails first. Technology can really stifle the creative process that is so important in the early stages of design. Draw at least 100 thumbnails in your sketchbook. It will really help you push your own boundaries and give you a number of ideas to choose from. 5. When considering which thumbnail you want to use, think about the different ways your logo will be translated for pamphlets, packages, and other promotional materials. Does your logo translate well to color AND black and white? How does it look on a dark background versus a light background? How does the logo look with text and without text? Is it as visually effective when you adjust the scale? Manipulate your logo over and over, and if it is still recognizable, you probably have yourself a really iconic logo! I hope this can help some of you designers and marketers, especially those of you who might be in the middle of branding or rebranding a company. The logo is always the first start! Happy designing!
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