dillonk
3 years ago5,000+ Views
It's not often that we get to see collaborative work here in the photography interest, so I am happy to show you the work of Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman. Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman met as students at the Institute of Design in Chicago and that's when they began working on photographic projects together. They have developed an extensive body of collaborative work, chronicling rites of passage and documenting the psychological landscapes and social architecture that surround us. The confluence of history, myth and popular culture is an ongoing theme in their collaborative work. Here is what Barbara and Lindsay say about their work Processed Views: "Processed Views interprets the frontier of industrial food production: the seductive and alarming intersection of nature and technology. As we move further away from the natural sources of our food, we head into uncharted territory replete with unintended consequences for the environment and for our health. In this study of the landscape of processed foods, we reference the work of photographer, Carleton Watkins (1829-1916). His sublime views framed the American West as a land of endless possibilities and significantly influenced the creation of the first national parks. However, many of Watkins’ photographs were commissioned by the corporate interests of the day; the Central Pacific Railroad, the lumber, milling and mining industries. Watkins embodied the commonly held 19th century view of Manifest Destiny – the inevitability of America’s bountiful land, justifiably utilized and consumed by its citizens. We built these views to examine consumption, progress and the changing landscape."
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It reminds me of that children's movie about candyland!
3 years ago·Reply
the cereal made me instantly think of my favorite cereal: trix lol Gotta love trix lol
3 years ago·Reply
Love this part of the artist statement referencing Watkins work from the 1800s because it's so applicable to this body of work, "America’s bountiful land, justifiably utilized and consumed by its citizens." I guess you can say this is the (fat) land of the free and home of the brave. @dillonk
3 years ago·Reply
@hunahuna Yes! You totally got it :) @timeturnerjones Although this may have been a subconscious feeling, it kind is supposed to spoil your appetite!
3 years ago·Reply
@dillonk Succdssful work then! The horrors of consumption displayed in a delicious, and disgusting, way.
3 years ago·Reply
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