3 years ago
acrossthesea
in English · 3,166 Views
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剩女 ( Leftover Women )
Back in 2007, Chinese state-run media started using the term 剩女, pronounced shèngnǔ, which means leftover women. The term is generally used to describe well educated, unmarried females over the age of 27 - ouch. Even the website of the government's supposedly feminist All-China Women's Federation featured articles about "leftover women" - until enough women complained. National Bureau of Statistics data shows there are now about 20 million more men under 30 than women under 30. The proportion of unmarried men aged 25-29 is higher than in women- over a third - but that doesn't mean they will easily match up, since Chinese men tend to "marry down", both in terms of age and educational attainment. "There is an opinion that A-quality guys will find B-quality women, B-quality guys will find C-quality women, and C-quality men will find D-quality women," says Huang Yuanyuan. "The people left are A-quality women and D-quality men. So if you are a leftover woman, you are A-quality." Meanwhile, the state-run media keep up a barrage of messages aimed at these educated woman. "Pretty girls do not need a lot of education to marry into a rich and powerful family. But girls with an average or ugly appearance will find it difficult," reads an excerpt from an article titled, Leftover Women Do Not Deserve Our Sympathy, posted on the website of the All-China Federation of Women in March 2011. It continues: "These girls hope to further their education in order to increase their competitiveness. The tragedy is, they don't realise that as women age, they are worth less and less. So by the time they get their MA or PhD, they are already old - like yellowed pearls." Ouch.
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4 comments
How can they say something like that? Especially as a bureau which is meant to represent the rights of women. Appalling.
@funkystar25 isn't it just! Can you even imagine what would happen if something like that got published in the UK?