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Larix kaempferi - Japanese larch, Karamatsu (Japanese)

Conservation Status
Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern
This species has a fairly restricted range in central Honshu, Japan. It is an extremely important timber tree and although it has been heavily exploited over time, there has been supplemental re-planting of the species essentially for commercial reasons. The provenance of the supplemental material is unknown, and it is likely that this comes from forestry sources, which is most likely improved or at least had some selection involved. It is impossible to distinguish natural trees from planted individuals, and there is also inter-breeding, so effectively the whole population is slowly being altered over time to being of mixed genetic origin. To what degree this genetic contamination results in any genetic decline is not known. As it is impossible to distinguish between the wild population and the introduced population, the species has to either be assessed as Data Deficient or Least Concern. Larix kaempferi is a species of mesic sites, occurring from the hills to high in the mountains (500 m to 2,300 m a.s.l.), on the south face of Fuji san it reaches 2,900 m. Unlike the other NE Asiatic larches it occupies better soils, often of recent volcanic origin, and is never found on peat. It is commonly found in association with other conifers, e.g. Pinus densiflora, Picea jezoensis subsp. hondoensis, Tsuga diversifolia, Abies homolepis at lower elevations, and Abies veitchii at higher elevations, but it is clearly a sub-climax species. Several broad-leaved tree genera are present at the lower elevations, e.g. Quercus, Fagus and Betula. Pure 'scrub stands' may occur at the upper limit of trees. Has been heavily exploited in the past for its timber – was used for house building, etc. But after logging, seedlings were planted back in the area again. So although the natural population has been logged, because there has been supplemental planting the exploitation can be considered not to have been that damaging as far as we can tell. The question is whether or not the seedlings were from the same subpopulation or were from a different subpopulation, or worse yet, from cultivated (improved) sources. Without further knowledge about the provenance of the seedling material one has to assume that these are introductions and thus over the long-term the population remains fairly stable. Phytopthora ramorum has been recorded to be sporulating in Larix kaempferi plants planted in Europe: if this were to spread to the native population in Japan, it could pose a problem. Japanese larch is an important timber tree in Japan and in Europe (Scotland), where it has been introduced in 1834. The wood is similar to that of European larch and is used for construction, railway sleepers, pit props and the pulp industry. It is also a frequently planted amenity tree in parks and large gardens and a limited number of cultivars are known. In Scotland, a spontaneous hybrid occurred around 1900 between Larix kaempferi and Larix decidua which was named Larix x eurolepis Henry (but is correctly named Larix x marschlinsii Coaz based on an earlier crossing event) and shows marked F1 hybrid vigour or heterosis. Its seed cones resemble those of Larix kaempferi with recurved scale apices, but are larger. This fast growing hybrid became much favoured by foresters and has been propagated and planted widely in many parts of Europe, often involving back-crosses with either parents. Despite this greater production of timber per ha/year of the hybrid, Japanese larch remains an important plantation tree for timber on poorer soils, where neither the hybrid not the other parent do so well and where much of Europe's plantation forestry is situated (the better soils being occupied by agriculture mostly for food crops). Part of the range falls inside a protected area, but much is outside. Larix kaempferi has also been planted back into the Yatsukaga-Chushin Kogen Quasi National Park.
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Paying it Forward
I started growing flowers when our kids were still really small. To put that into perspective, Elora is in her third year of college and Jasper just graduated from high school. So I have been growing flowers for a very long time.  When the kids were little, Chris was working as a mechanic down in Seattle and commuting back and forth to work every day. During the week he was hardly home and I was by myself caring for two young children so I had a lot of time to think about what I wanted to be when I grew up.  I tried out numerous small business ideas during those early years to see what would stick, including planting an heirloom cider orchard (I didn’t take into account that it would be at least five years until my first viable harvest). I raised more than a hundred chickens in our backyard for a rainbow egg business, but the birds kept escaping from their coop, and I would get angry calls from our neighbors daily.  I even tried my hand at growing miniature vegetables for local customers, but quickly realized it takes a lot of baby zucchini to make $5. I attempted so many different ideas but none of them went anywhere.  Along the way, I added flowers to my garden and started selling the extra blooms. Unlike all the other things I made or grew, flowers had the power to stir such deep emotion. Every time I delivered my homegrown blooms, complete strangers would open up and share the most beautiful stories with me.  Almost every recipient had a flower memory that they could recall as if it were yesterday. It wasn’t until I started sharing flowers, which I had grown myself, that I felt like I had finally found my calling.  From that season forward, every waking minute was devoted to the garden. I was obsessed. But I knew very little about flower farming. 
Terrarium Side Table - Easy DIY
From the looks of it you might think, TOO HARD, FORGET IT. But you'd be wrong because this is actually a really easy DIY project that can really enhance your indoors by bringing the outdoors in. Supplies Needed: -4 sheets of plexiglass that are 24 x 18 inches -2 sheets of plexiglass that are 24.5 x 24.5 inches or larger -weld-on #4 and applicator bottle with needle -1 sheet 24.5 x 24.5 inches OSB or plywood -(2) 24.5 inch 1x2 wood pieces -(2) 26 inch 1x2 wood pieces -one 1 inch dowel for legs -4 screws -plexiglass knife (if needed) -saw (if needed) -drill -spray paint -terrarium insides (gravel or river rock, moss, manufactured mulch, faux succulents) This is an easy project for those who know there way around the DIY world. If you are new to DIY, then this is going to be a bit more advanced than you might be used to or come to expect. Also, expect to spend a good $200 on this project, depending on what you already have on hand and what you need to buy. Step One: Assemble the base of your terrarium. You can see from the photo above how I (very simply) put mine together. Basically you're going to make a short table with a lip that is sized to fit your plexi box inside. Step Two: Assemble your terrarium box. You'll be using electrical tape and the weld-on #4 to fuse the corners together. These sheets can be cut down by you or the hardware staff. They also come in different pre-cut sizes. Step Three: Create the top piece by fusing two plexi sheets (one smaller than the other) together. Step Four: Fill any edges of your base with wood filler and then paint the base. Step Five: The funnest part of this project is the creation of the contents. Have fun with rocks, plants and
17 stylish plants for hanging pots
Plants in hanging pots are an excellent way to add greenery to your indoor space for the living room. Both the container and the plant add colours to your living room. Planters require zero landscaping, and they are effortless to care for. If you live on rent, then plants for hanging pots are very much suitable for you. These are popular indoor and outdoor hanging plants you can change as per your need. Verbena Verbena provides stress-relieving essential oil. This plant is available in different varieties. It requires a lot of suns and well-draining soil. Verbena is an attractive butterfly plant. Oxalis Triangularis Oxalis Triangularis Is a colourful hanging plant and also known as the purple Shamrock. This plant can be grown indoors or outdoors. This plant is toxic to pets, so be careful when you place it. The leaves of this plant open up during the day and close at night. Blue bacopa This flowering plant needs consistent moisture; that is why they are grown in containers. Place your blue bacopa where it can get a lot of afternoon shade for good growth. strawberry This is easy to grow the hanging plant. The strawberry flowers have a pleasant fragrance and look pretty like roses, and you will also get the benefit of the fruit. Lobelia Lobelia is available in intense blue colours, and it is a rare colour for flowers. This plant can grow in cooler climates and the shade too. Boston fern Boston fern requires constantly moist soil. This is a typical tropical house plant. This plant can prosper outside if you live in a building climate. Begonia boliviensis Begonia boliviensis has a unique angel wing-shaped leaf that makes it look alluring. One plant can fill a whole Hanging pot in the sun or shade. This plant is hummingbird friendly. Ivy Geranium This plant prefers full hot and Sunny areas. Ivy Geranium is very popular in European countries, and this is a low maintenance plant. Hanging Fuchsia Fuchsias are not suitable for hot climates. But they are a good choice for hanging plants for summer and also attract hummingbirds. They bloom wonderfully in cool areas. Scaevola aemula 'blue wonder.' This plant is known as a fan flower because of its blue fan-shaped flowers. This plant can tolerate drought and looks beautiful in a hanging basket. It does not require deadheading as it blooms, which is why this is suitable for a lazy gardener. Spider plant This is a yellow and green house plant. Spider plants are most adaptable and easy to grow. This plant needs direct sunlight and also can tolerate partial sunlight. Diascia The ideal situation for the growth of this plant is normal temperature, slightly acidic soil and full or partial sunshade. Diascia is a short-lived perennial. Burro's Tail Its tail-like woven branch looks great from a hanging pot. It is very famous for its stunning look. Nasturtium This is the best low maintenance plant and is available, especially in trailing varieties. It prefers moist soil and full sun or partial shade. Petunia This tender perennial is an ideal plant for hanging pots due to its voluminous flowers. Some varieties of petunia require a bit of pruning and deadheading. Black-eyed Susan vine Black-eyed Susan Vine grows very fast and climbs up on the basket's hanger. It is easy to maintain and produce colourful flowers. Grow these plants along a wall. Sweet alyssum This plant is heat and drought resistant. The plant requires specific layer builder environments; its white blooms and enticing scent attracts butterflies and bees.
Qu'est ce que le survivalisme ?
Le survivalisme par définition est un mode de vie qui constitue à une préparation à une éventuelle catastrophe. La préparation des survivants repose principalement sur l'apprentissage des techniques de survie et des concepts médicaux. Avec la bonne préparation, le bon équipement et les bons vêtements avec notre boutique militariat, vous pouvez survivre à la forêt ou prévenir les catastrophes. L'origine du survivalisme a commencé avec l'herbertisme. Il s'agit d'un événement pour former l'officier de marine Georges Hébert. Le but de cette activité est de devenir puissant et utile. Pour ce faire, il est nécessaire de réaliser une éducation sportive, nature et utilitaire. Aux États-Unis dans les années 1960, l'inflation et la dépréciation ont incité les gens à adopter l'idée de kits de sauvetage. À partir des années 1970, certains livres sur le mot « survie » et les méthodes appropriées ont commencé à paraître. Kurt Saxon sera le premier à utiliser le terme "survivaliste". Cependant, John Pugsley publiera "Strategy Alpha" dans les années 1980. Ce livre est devenu une référence pour les survivalistes américains. Dans les années 1990, le mythe du bug du millénaire a donné un nouvel élan au mouvement survivaliste. Les divers événements catastrophiques de 2000 à nos jours continuent d'alimenter la peur et de stimuler la motivation survivaliste. La survie est parfois liée aux croyances religieuses. Être préparé signifie parfois commencer un long voyage avec la famille, les amis et les voisins, mais parfois le voyage doit être commencé seul. Ne pas se préparer, bien ou mal, à l'effondrement imminent, souvent appelé survivalisme. En revanche, il peut y avoir rupture plus ou moins normale. Ils dépendent de l'âge, du sexe, du lieu de résidence, de la formation précédente, des personnes accompagnantes, du matériel disponible... Ainsi, notre magasin survivaliste a pour objectif de regrouper au même endroit du matériel utile et de qualité, et à un prix abordable, dans le respect des grandes règles des survivalistes : eau, alimentation, énergie, hygiène/santé, défense, et blog Connaissances. Par conséquent, nous ne parlerons pas d'invasion extraterrestre...
Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah
The ksar, a group of earthen buildings surrounded by high walls, is a traditional pre-Saharan habitat. The houses crowd together within the defensive walls, which are reinforced by corner towers. Ait-Ben-Haddou, in Ouarzazate province, is a striking example of the architecture of southern Morocco. Located in the foothills on the southern slopes of the High Atlas in the Province of Ouarzazate, the site of Ait-Ben-Haddou is the most famous ksar in the Ounila Valley. The Ksar of Aït-Ben-Haddou is a striking example of southern Moroccan architecture. The ksar is a mainly collective grouping of dwellings. Inside the defensive walls which are reinforced by angle towers and pierced with a baffle gate, houses crowd together - some modest, others resembling small urban castles with their high angle towers and upper sections decorated with motifs in clay brick - but there are also buildings and community areas. It is an extraordinary ensemble of buildings offering a complete panorama of pre-Saharan earthen construction techniques. The oldest constructions do not appear to be earlier than the 17th century, although their structure and technique were propagated from a very early period in the valleys of southern Morocco. The site was also one of the many trading posts on the commercial route linking ancient Sudan to Marrakesh by the Dra Valley and the Tizi-n'Telouet Pass. Architecturally, the living quarters form a compact grouping, closed and suspended. The community areas of the ksar include a mosque, a public square, grain threshing areas outside the ramparts, a fortification and a loft at the top of the village, an caravanserai, two cemeteries (Muslim and Jewish) and the Sanctuary of the Saint Sidi Ali or Amer. The Ksar of Ait- Ben-Haddou is a perfect synthesis of earthen architecture of the pre-Saharan regions of Morocco. Criterion (iv): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou is an eminent example of a ksar in southern Morocco illustrating the main types of earthen constructions that may be observed dating from the 17th century in the valleys of Dra, Todgha, Dadès and Souss. Criterion (v): The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou illustrates the traditional earthen habitat, representing the culture of southern Morocco, which has become vulnerable as a result of irreversible socio-economic and cultural changes Integrity (2009) All the structures comprising the ksar are located within the boundaries of the property and the buffer zone protects its environment. The earthen buildings are very vulnerable due to lack of maintenance and regular repair resulting from the abandonment of the ksar by its inhabitants. The CERKAS (Centre for the conservation and rehabilitation of the architectural heritage of atlas and sub-atlas zones) monitors, with difficulty, respect for the visual integrity of the property. Authenticity (2009) In comparison to other ksour of the region, the Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou has preserved its architectural authenticity with regard to configuration and materials. The architectural style is well preserved and the earthen constructions are perfectly adapted to the climatic conditions and are in harmony with the natural and social environment. The large houses in the lower part of the village, with well conserved decorative motifs, are regularly maintained. The construction materials used still remain earth and wood. The inclination to introduce cement has so far been unsuccessful, thanks to the continued monitoring of the «Comité de contrôle des infractions» (Rural Community, Town Planning Division, Urban Agency, CERKAS). Only a few lintels and reinforced concrete escaped its vigilance, but they have been hidden by earthen rendering. Particular attention is also paid to doors and windows giving on to the lanes, to ensure that the wood is not replaced by metal. Protection and management requirements (2009) Protection measures essentially relate to the different laws for the listing of historic monuments and sites, in particular the Law 22-80 concerning Moroccan heritage. The Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou currently has a five-year management plan (2007-2012). This management plan is the result of two years of reflection and workshops involving all the persons and institutions concerned with the future of the site, in particular the local populations. The recommendations of this plan are being implemented. Furthermore, two management committees have been established (a local committee and a national one) in which all the parties are represented and cooperate in decision-making. As well as managing the property, CERKAS ensures coordination in the implementation of this management plan. visit our site for more informations...
Grow Your Own Avocado Tree From Seed
Planting your own avocado tree is a lot easier than you think. You don't need a lot of materials, space, or time. This project is great for people of all ages and can grow from your outdoor garden or inside your home. Here's how to get started: Directions: 1. Take a ripe avocado and cut it into 2 halves. Remove the seed from the center, rinse off with fresh water, and make sure there is no fruit on it. Let the seed dry completely. 2. Push 3-4 toothpicks inside the seed from all sides towards the middle. Place in a full glass of water so the pointy end of the seed faces upward, while the round part is in the water by an inch. 3. Keep the glass in a semi warm climate controlled place (away from direct sunlight). Leave for 4-6 weeks and check regularly to see if additional water needs to be added. Note: The seed will sprout a stem and roots. Once you see the stem is 6 inches long, cut it down to 3 inches. The stem will continue to grow and you will start to notice some leaves. 4. Take out the seed from the glass and move it to a large pot 3 ft. wide and 3 ft. deep. Add some rich fertile soil and compost to the pot and plant the seed. Note: The root of the seed should be pushed inside the soil about 1-3 inches, while the top half of the seed should remain outside the pot. 5. Place the pot where it can get good sunlight, water, and air. The soil should remain moist, but not completely saturated. Note: It's helpful to use a pot with good drainage. Pinch the top leaves of the plant every time the stem length increases by 6 inches to help the growth of the plant. *It's beneficial to start planting in the Spring. Also, if you don't want to plant your avocado tree in the garden, make sure to take your plant outside on a daily basis for sunlight and fresh air. It will take about 7=15 years for the tree to yield fruit, so be patient!
Pinus wallichiana - Himalayan white pine, Bhutan pine, Blue pine, Himalayan pine, Kail (Hindi, Kashmiri), Tongshi (Bhutanese), Qiao Song (Chinese)
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern Widespread and common, not threatened and hence listed as Least Concern. Pinus wallichiana grows in the Himalayas in the valleys and foothills, to a maximum altitude of 2,700 m, but in Bhutan it reaches 3,400 m a.s.l. Sometimes it forms pure stands or forests, in other places it appears as an important forest component mixed with broad-leaved trees, e.g. species of the genera Quercus, Acer and Ilex. In the western Himalayas, where conditions are drier, Pinus wallichiana forms mixed forests with Cedrus deodara. Other conifers with which it may be associated are Pinus roxburghii, Abies spectabilis, or Abies densa and Tsuga dumosa in the wetter eastern part of its range. Potentially, over-exploitation could negatively impact the population, but the species is too common and wide-spread for this to have serious consequences other than locally. Himalayan white pine or Bhutan pine is an important timber tree in many parts of the Himalaya. It is of similar timber properties and quality to Pinus strobus and Pinus monticola in North America, with tall, straight trees producing straight grained wood of good strength. It is used for construction, carpentry and joinery, wall panelling, veneers, furniture, fences and gates, crates and boxes, and railway sleepers after treatment with preservatives. In India (Himachal Pradesh) resin tapping is an important use to obtain naval stores. A sweet liquid known as honey dew is secreted by aphids from the leaves and collected by local people of the mountain forests for consumption. Bhutan pine was introduced to England in 1823 and, unlike several other species of Pinus subsection Strobi, it turned out to be relatively immune to infections with blister rust (Cronartium ribicola; Basidiomycota) as well as to atmospheric pollution. In forestry it is also used in plantations and several hybrids with related species have been established with timber production in mind (e.g. the cross between Pinus strobus and Pinus wallichiana = Pinus x schwerinii Fitschen). Bhutan pine is a widely used amenity tree and a number of cultivars have been selected and are in the trade. This species occurs in several protected areas. https://conifersgarden.com/encyclopedia/pinus/pinus-wallichiana
Saxegothaea conspicua - Prince Albert’s yew, Saxegothaea, Maniú , Mañío, Mañío Hembra , Mañío Macho, Mañío de Hojas Cortas (Spanish)
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened Currently Saxegothaea conspicua has a relatively continuous distribution, particularly in the Andes. However, in Chile logging and fire wood extraction still occurs within its habitat and if this continues then there is the possibility of the population becoming severely fragmented, particularly in the Coastal Cordillera where most forest destruction occurs. However, presently the loss of habitat has not been sufficient for it to qualify for listing under criterion B and the population of mature individuals is too large to qualify for criteria C or D. There is a possibility that it could be listed as Vulnerable (VU) under criteria A2, A3 or A4, but more information concerning rates of deforestation and past population sizes is required. Argentinian populations are reported to be too small to affect the global listing. Presently it should be listed as Near Threatened (NT) but this species requires continued monitoring, especially in terms of selective felling and range reduction due to fire or changes in land use. Future reassessments could find that it would qualify for VU under criterion B or even criterion A if information on reduction rates are obtained. It is an extremely shade tolerant species and capable of root-suckering.  It is most abundant in the wetter Valdivian rainforest where it is commonly associated with Laureliopsis philippiana, Nothofagus dombeyi and Nothofagus nervosa. In the coastal Cordillera it occurs at low altitudes on poorly-drained marine and fluvio-glacial deposits or between 400-950 m above sea-level on shallow soils developed from micaschists (Lusk 1996). In these sites it is commonly associated with Drimys winteri, Ammomyrtus luma, Dasyphyllum diacanthoides, Eucryphia cordifolia and Weinmannia trichosperma (Lusk 1996). Where ranges overlap it is commonly associated with Podocarpus nubigenus. The ever increasing conversion of native forest in the Coastal Cordillera to commercial plantations of Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus, means that much of the habitat for this species has been lost and continues to disappear. Logging in the Andes outside of National Parks still occurs. Logging is often for firewood or is selective in order to extract young straight stemmed trees before they become contorted and multi-stemmed (Hechenleitner et al. 2005). In Argentina there is no commercial use of its wood, although it may be used locally. In Chile it is highly prized for its uniform, yellow-rose colour, durable wood which is easily worked and is used for making fine furniture. It is also used for construction. It is afforded good protection throughout its range in National Parks, particularly in the large tracts of protected areas that are contiguous between Chile and Argentina in the Andes, where there are some important old-growth forests. There is less protection in the northern part of its distribution, particularly in the Coastal Cordillera of Chile. https://conifersgarden.com/encyclopedia/saxegothaea/saxegothaea-conspicua
Agathis borneensis - Borneo kauri, Malayan kauri, Western dammar, Dammar minyak (Malay)
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered Agathis borneensis has in the past been confused with Agathis dammara, and the 1998 assessment of Agathis dammara treated Agathis borneensis as a synonym. Agathis endertii was also previously considered a good species (Farjon 1998, 2001) and hence assessed separately for the IUCN Red List, however, Farjon (2010) now considers it to be conspecific with Agathis borneensis. Deforestation and targeted logging have been ongoing for many years, have accelerated in recent decades, and are continuing to deplete the global population of this species, especially in Borneo and Sumatera which form the major part of its range. An estimate of 50% reduction between 1950 and 2025 is probably on the conservative side. This puts the species in the category Endangered. Agathis borneensis occurs in lowland to upland tropical rainforest as scattered emergent trees and in low lying kerangas forest on sandy or sometimes peaty soils, where it can form extensive pure stands. This species has been very heavily over-exploited in many areas and as a result its total area of occupancy (AOO) is estimated to have at least been reduced by half and this is still ongoing. Stands covering an estimated total of 30,000 ha discovered in Kalimantan in the 1930s had effectively been logged out by the mid 1960s. Most stands outside the few well protected nature reserves (mostly situated in the Malay Peninsula and in Sabah) have been seriously depleted and it is doubted that regeneration will be sufficient to restore the losses. Habitat degradation has caused further reductions in recruitment of young trees to replace felled ones. This species is one of the most valuable and sought after timber trees in Southeast Asia and it is traded on the international market. This species (and Agathis dammara) are planted on a fairly large scale in forestry plantations in Jawa, but only locally on a small scale within its native range. This species is present in several protected areas, but these only cover a tiny proportion of the global population and are skewed geographically to parts of Malaysia; in Indonesia there are few reserves relevant to this species. https://conifersgarden.com/encyclopedia/agathis/agathis-borneensis