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Egg Tarts! (Macau 06.13)

I'd always been sceptical of egg tarts before travelling to Macau. I'd never eaten them before, even though custard tarts are popular in England, just something about them which didn't quite appeal. However, Macau's egg tarts (Pastel de Nata in the original Portugese and 蛋挞 in the Chinese) are one of must-eat foods of the region and there was no way my friend Winnie was letting me leave without trying one. So I tried one - and good gracious, I have no idea why I didn't try these before. They're amazing! I don't want to think about how many I ate while we were in Macau....absolutely delicious. (Just writing this is making me crave them!) Winnie was right - there's no way you can leave Macau without having eaten the local egg tarts. I ate egg tarts when I arrived back in China and they were pretty good, I tried egg custard tarts when I got back to England and they were ok but nothing matches the ones I ate in Macau!
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@acrossthesea I ate a fair few when I was in Macau but it got really bad when I went back to Beijing^^ I ate soooo many.......
egg tarts - I always eat so many of these when I'm in China
YES! I had these when I was in Hong Kong and they were delicious. Luckily there are ace Chinese bakeries near my house so I can have some whenever I want, but something about the heat of Hong Kong made them taste much better :)
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