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Best Games For Low Spec PC/Laptop

If you're one of the people who just happen to have a low-end old PC, with minimum specs, (ie., have an integrated Intel-HD GPU, 4Gb or even 2Gb ram, Intel Core i3 or i5 processor),
-Then don't worry, there are so many great games that you can run on your machine.

PC gaming dates back to the 1980s, from Pac-Man to Sim City, then evolving to revolutionary games like Quake, Age of Empires, Half-Life in the 90s, the array of good games is endless.

Then the early 2000s, games like Half-Life 2 (listed in this article below) and Call of Duty, GTA IV, Battlefield, changed the way PC games are made.

The point is, there is an excessive amount of good PC games, that can be played in your low spec 4Gb ram PC (some of the games in this list can even be played in a 1Gb or less ram PC) with no dedicated graphics card, and other minimal specs.

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State of Decay 3 Reportedly Built Using Unreal Engine 5
State of Decay 3 was announced one year ago at the Xbox Games Showcase event. Since then, not much has been known about the game made by Undead Labs, which seems to be carrying the survival genre with an open world. Fortunately, recent information hunger has been somewhat satisfied after job postings hinted at what game engine Undead Labs used to build State of Decay 3. The job vacancy is listed on the BambooHR website where specifically, it is looking for a Sound Designer who will join the State of Decay 3 development team in Seattle, Washington. One of the sentences in the job description mentions the implementation of audio through “Blueprints (UE5)”. UE5 here refers to Unreal Engine 5 – the game engine from Epic Games which is also used in several other big games such as Senua's Saga: Hellblade II and BioShock 4. Apart from the not so significant upgrade from Unreal Engine 4 to Unreal Engine 5, it doesn't mean that State of Decay 3 can't appear more immersive than other games or their predecessors. Moreover, the Unreal Engine 5 demo that was exhibited by The Coalition some time ago looks charming and it runs on Xbox Series X which incidentally is the main console for State of Decay 3. For the rest, nothing is known about State of Decay 3 other than the fact that it will launch for Xbox Series X/S as well as PC. https://peatix.com/event/2368170 https://peatix.com/event/2474435 https://peatix.com/event/2474933 https://peatix.com/event/2381716 https://www.producthunt.com/@mp3quack https://peatix.com/event/2367916 https://academy.autodesk.com/users/rofifus https://peatix.com/event/2368229
Should I Consider Building My Own Computer?
I believe what you primarily want to do with it, and how much you want to invest, should be the first consideration. Various tasks are more important than other components, so you can first choose the important element according to your budget, then choose the second most significant component according to the first component, and so on. Only presume, for example, that you have a budget to create a decent PC that can run the latest games. If you have a 1920x1080 display resolution with a 60hz refresh rate there is a small improvement over a Gtx1060, or even a 1050ti. If you purchase a display, you could use an AMD Rx580 instead, as monitors supporting AMD's adaptive sync are less costly than those supporting a nvidia. The CPU is the next big element. Based on your graphics card, you can select i5 8400 as a decent amount of money is saved compared to i5 8600 K and i7, which are both less costly, when playing on the mid-level GPU. you have to save on your graphics card. You don't need a high-cost motherboard or aftermarket CPU cooler because you can't overclock an i5 8400. Expensive RAM modules look cool, but the cheapest modules from a well-known company would be workable without overclocking on the agenda. If you need it, RAM can be easily upgraded down the track. Finally, you may want to consider your graphics card's power and length specifications and select a case and power supply. If you're instead making content and editing a video, it's mostly the CPU; so you might go to an i7 8700 with a cheaper graphics card, for example, in place of the i5 and GTX1060 combo. It may not be your job to edit games or videos so you may not need a graphics card at all, you may be constructing a media pc or a home server with an i3 and a bunch of hard drives or an office PC without any extras. 1 TB of SSD sounds cool, but maybe you're able to get off with a 240 GB C drive instead of a cheaper mechanical HDD. You can easily format and reload the OS without losing any images, music , movies or whatever, by putting the C-driven drive on another disc or partition of your data. I see people buying or designing computers sometimes and splashing out on an expensive motherboard and CPU thinking that they're going to make it quicker. But for general use, an expensive i7 would feel about the same on an expensive "gaming" motherboard as an i5 on a cheap motherboard. More expensive components give the average PC consumer little advantage after a certain point; my general rule is to figure out which components can make the most difference to you and design your PC around them, depending on what you are prepared to spend. In a modern PC, the CPU is not always the performance "bottleneck," and some individuals purchase more than they need. Last but not least, don't be tempted by unknown manufacturers' dirt-cheap power supplies. You probably don't need an expensive PSU valued "platinum," but a blown power supply, or one that keeps restarting your computer mysteriously because it can't sustain steady performance under load, or one that introduces coil whine (Wikipedia) is a sure way to ruin your new PC's excitement. Choose bits. Build a PC. Share and compare. And Tom's Hardware: Decent online tools are available to help you select your components for the Hardcore PC Enthusiast. Have some fun! So this was all about this article, in case you have more Interest in PC and kinds of stuff and wants to build one for yourself, then check out this article on gaming pc under 30000. Thank you for reading till the end.
Upcoming Free Steam Games
If you want to spend the balmy summer evenings of the upcoming weekend in front of your PC, you don't even have to spend money on exciting games. Steam and the Epic Games Store operators are again offering several games that can be tried out for free or kept permanently. The start is made by the build-up game "Frostpunk" on Steam. The mixture of survival, story and construction can be tested in its entirety without obligation until August 16. Instead of romantic South Seas or medieval settings, an icy end-time world awaits the player in "Frostpunk", where every decision can mean the difference between life and death. The Epic Games Store, on the other hand, offers "Rebel Galaxy", an open-world game in space. Here, players have to trade and compete against pirates. The game can be downloaded for free until August 19 and kept forever. Additionally you can check out the GameGator Store for some cheap games. The Battle Royale veteran "PUBG: Battlegrounds" can also be played for free on Steam. The title still has many fans, so those interested don't need to worry about having enough players. The co-op shooter "Payday 2" can also be tried out this weekend without obligation. "Payday 2" puts the player in the role of bank robbers or police officers. Finally, the last free weekend is an old acquaintance: The multiplayer shooter "Battlefield 4" can be tried out without obligation until August 16, plus a free weapon bundle as a permanent gift. Although the title is already eight years old, the battles with tanks, helicopters and boats are still a lot of fun.
Star Wars: Battlefield.. er, Battlefront
I don't play as many shooters as I used to. Nowadays, I play a lot more story-based gaming. A lot more solo campaigns. It's something I enjoy - the building of a narrative, the participation in the narrative. It's not that shooters don't have narratives, it's just that they're mostly aimed for online competitive play these days. That being said, when I recently purchased my PS4, I bought the Battlefront bundle, so I got Star Wars: Battlefront along with the console. Which I'm actually really happy about. I love Star Wars. Like, way too much. I'd been paying some attention to this game in the months leading up to it's release, and I was pretty sold on it early. I loved the original Battlefront. I played a s#itload of it on my PSP back in the day. So seeing a new one being made, with the option of first or third person shooting, got me stoked. Seeing the graphic updates and the scope of the matchups brought out that good ol' nostalgia. Really most of my initial draw to this reboot is fueled by nostalgia. As things go when you're running on nostalgia, the feeling fades fairly quickly when you have the opportunity to re-experience the old nostalgic fun. When I sat down to play some good ol Battlefront (taking a break from the eternal time-suck that is Fallout 4) I was immediately prompted to make an EA account to even play the game. Cool. But I made the account, immediately forgetting all the details for it because fuck you, Electronic Arts. I was then prompted to play through the 'Missions' option of the game before jumping online into real-life action. But I ain't no chump. So I decided I didn't need no damn 'Missions' and I jumped right into the online competitive play scene. And died. Promptly. Because the way that Battlefront is set up, as far as I can see, is that players of varying different levels are all shoved into the same match as one another. This means that plenty of players are outfitted way better than you are, armed with just your teeny blaster and one grenade. So I died a lot. Probably more than regular people would, because I'm particularly shit at these large-scale gun battles. I get turned around a lot and I have a hard time finding where the fight is happening in a lot of games. I really couldn't find a picture that captures what I want to say here adequately. You see how that AT-ST is currently experiencing some explosive action? Well that doesn't begin to cover how it pans out in actual live games. In the games I've played so far, there are approximately a million explosions per square foot of map space. Grenades - everywhere. Orbital Strikes - often. THERMAL IMPLODERS. ROCKET LAUNCHERS. EXPLOSIVE LASER ROUNDS FROM AT-ATs and AT-STs. It's hard to get yourself oriented to the game as a newbie because you're constantly screaming at your TV, because there are A MILLION EXPLOSIONS HAPPENING ALL THE TIME. Thankfully, there isn't friendly fire in the game modes I've played so far. You can accidentally kill yourself, but your teammates explosives shouldn't be a problem for you. So once you get adjusted to the constant explosions, you'll start figuring out the clear similarities between Battlefront and Battlefield. It's in more than just the same. It's in the way the maps are set up, and the feel of the weapons. The grander scale of some of the 20 vs 20 maps scream Battlefield, especially when you look skyward and see TIE Fighters and X-Wings tearing across the sky. (I don't honestly know, but I'd like to think those same starfighters screaming across the ceiling in the ground force games are other players playing a fighter squadron match on the same map as you in live time.) There are about 9 different game types, ranging from your regular Team Deathmatch to Hero Hunt, where 7 players hunt down the 8th, a Hero character. Killing the hero grants the player the next turn as one of the icons of the film franchise. I feel like I always wind up getting Leia. So the gameplay on the ground isn't really all that special or unique except for the Star Wars varnish. It's still a competent shooter with a lot of action and sprawling maps to get turned around on. Where I lose my mind is in the Fighter Squadron matches. Piloting a TIE Fighter feels all kinds of correct in Battlefront. I try to play most games in the first-person perspective, for some kind of realer connection to the whole shebang, but I am too green. I haven't quite found my wings yet and so I lose track of the player I'm chasing in the madness of aerial combat. Still, in either first person or third, fighting these battles in these starships is such a rewarding feeling. I'm pretty bad at them, but I enjoy it the whole time. I love feeling like a kid shooting lasers at other kids. Plus, with the fast pace of it all, I don't get too bummed when I inevitably bite it. Which I do. A lot. Ultimately I think Battlefront functions as a competent Battlefield clone. It's really not changing up the game for online FPS titles and it's really not even making the existing model look perfect. It's just a fun shooting romp dressed up in the most popular franchise in history. That being said, it feels so good to have a good Star Wars game again. It's been a long time since KOTOR.
It's Here, It's Happening: MGSV
Fans can release their held breath; as of today, September 1, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain has been released, and you can pick it up immediately. You might not be able to get your hands on the cover above, because the day one edition will fly off the shelves faster than you could imagine. Only fitting, for the end of such a storied franchise. Few other games achieve the reverant status afforded to the Metal Gear series. They simply don't make fans like the fans of Metal Gear. The series has spanned almost 20 different games, across over a half dozen different platforms. Now, with this game, the series has reached even newer heights, and the fans are clamoring. So what do we know about MGSV already? Well, kind of a lot. Nowhere near all of it yet, but certainly a lot. We know that it's set in Afghanistan in 1984 - nine years after MGSV: Ground Zeroes, and 11 years or so before the first Metal Gear, which was set in 1995. We know that in this game, Snake's code name is Punished "Venom" Snake. We know that he loses an arm and has it replaced by a robotic transplant - hence the subtitle. We also know that there is a man (who may or may not be a figment of Snake's disturbed psyche, going by trailers) called Skull Face. Why is that? It's because his face was heavily damaged in a bombing of his home as a child. From a gameplay perspective, we also know that this game emphasizes the actual gaming far more than any other installation has. With the exception of the prologue, the cutscenes are much shorter than one might expect from a Metal Gear game, and there is a much larger emphasis placed on the player's decision making and game playing. Phantom Pain features a free, open world for the player to conduct their mercenary business in. The player is dropped into missions with only an objective; the manner in which you accomplish this objective is entirely up to you. Taking away a little from their stealth game roots, players have the ability to go balls-to-the-wall with it, loading out with heavy weapons and giving the possibility for airstrikes and the like. However, you can of course go about things in a stealthy way, accomplishing the objective without raising any alarms and with barely a guard's hair rustled. You are rewarded for either approach, though series fans will likely stick to the stealth side of things. Don't fix what ain't broke, right? Also new in this game is the things you can do with Mother Base, Snake's center of operations floating near the Seychelles of the eastern coast of Africa. In Phantom Pain, you have the ability to recruit and hold mercenary troops whom you can use then to send out on different side missions that can earn you rewards. These rewards can be things like money or metal goods, which can in turn be used to upgrade your gear or the base itself. It's kind of a game within a game, and it carries its own risks. Your troops are given ranks, and if they wake on a mission that's above their ability, all you will get out of it is dead units. So you have to spend some time training your people to be the best they can be, all so you can make your equipment and base the best that it could be. All in all, everything that has gone into this game is the finest work of videogame's favorite crazy person, Hideo Kojima. He has said in interviews before that this game is the game he's been ideally trying to make since the very beginning. It's only now that the technology is where it needs to be for it to have been a possibility. With The Phantom Pain, we close the book on the legacy of Metal Gear Solid, and it is a decisive, astounding finale.