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Agathis lanceolata - Serpentine forest kauri, Koghis kauri, Kaori de forét (French)

Conservation Status
Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable
Agathis lanceolata has a history of exploitation for its timber and has undergone a decline in its extent of occurrence (EOO), area of occupancy (AOO) and quality of habitat. Its EOO is estimated to be 5,378 km², based on herbarium specimens and field observations. Overexploitation has led to a significant decline in numbers of individuals, habitat degradation and habitat conversion, extent of occurrence and area of occupancy. The subpopulations are severely fragmented, as more than half the individuals are in small and isolated patches. The estimated total population is less than 10,000 mature trees. Each of the main subpopulations contains much less than 1,000 mature individuals. Taken together, these data indicate an assessment of Vulnerable.
Agathis lanceolata is concentrated in the southern massif of New Caledonia with outlying localities in Province Nord on the Boulinda and Mé Maoya massifs and the Col Maré. Occurs at altitudes ranging from 200 to 1,100 m.
The total population is estimated to be less than 10,000 mature individuals with no subpopulation with more than 1,000 individuals. A large emergent tree restricted to dense humid rainforest on ultramafic substrates.
The species has a history of overexploitation. Although plantations have been established, illegal logging is still a problem. Habitat fragmentation due to the effects of repeated fires and land clearance is another problem with most subpopulations restricted to fragments of primary forest, generally in sheltered valleys.
This species was heavily exploited for is valuable timber, especially in the 19th and 20th century. Plantations have been established in southern New Caledonia.
Four of the main subpopulations are protected within reserves at Saille, Rivière Bleue, Mt Ongone and Thy. These are all low altitude sites in the southern part of its range.
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Picea sitchensis - Sitka spruce, Tideland spruce
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern This spruce still covers vast tracts of coastal mainland and islands along the Pacific Coast of North America; it is also a pioneer after disturbance, either natural or from logging, and will return unless deliberately prevented. Consequently it is assessed as Least Concern. Picea sitchensis occurs from tidewater up to steep mountain sides in Alaska and British Columbia, generally to ca. 900 m a.s.l. (highest record 1,189 m), always in proximity to oceanic weather. The soils are variable, usually with a thick humus layer. On Vancouver Island and on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington this spruce attains its greatest size. It is usually mixed with Tsuga heterophylla (shade tolerant competitor), Pseudotsuga menziesii and Thuja plicata, other associated conifers are Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (locally), Xanthocyparis nootkatensis, and Abies amabilis, at higher elevations replaced by Tsuga mertensiana or Abies lasiocarpa; Alnus rubra alongside rivers and Acer macrophyllum in groves are common broad-leaved trees. Logging may have in the past depleted stands of mature trees where these have not been replaced by the same species, but in general, good regeneration has ensured that there has been limited decline in extent of occurrence and area of occupancy. Sitka spruce grows to the largest tree of its genus and is abundant in the coastal forests between roughly 43º and 62º N along the Pacific Ocean. It is a highly valuable timber tree with growth rates exceeding those of other species and, in old growth stands, truly magnificent sizes. It is (still) heavily logged in clear cuts from natural stands including old growth (in this part of the world this means: forest that was never cut before). Smaller sizes go to the paper industry, but big trees are prized for construction and special uses such as small aircraft, masts and spars for sailing ships, oars for rowing boats, ladders, and sounding boards of musical instruments. Sitka spruce has been widely used in plantation forestry on poor acid soils in cool and wet climates such as the hills and moors of Ireland and Scotland; this timber is used for pulp wood. In horticulture it finds less use; most plantings in large parks as specimen trees date from the 19th century, and only a limited number of cultivars has been produced, mostly dwarf forms. It requires a cool and moist climate. This species is present in several protected areas, including national parks. https://conifersgarden.com/encyclopedia/picea/picea-sitchensis
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana - Port Orford cedar, Gingerpine, Lawson's cypress, Oregon cedar, Port Orford cypress, Port Orford white-cedar, Port-Orford cedar
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened Port Orford Cedar (POC) is native to a limited area along the Pacific Coast from Coos Bay, Oregon, to the mouth of the Mad River near Arcata, California, USA.  Its range extends from the coast to about 50 miles inland.  There is also a small disjunct population in the Scott Mountains of California. This species occurs in the greatest abundance within about 64 km of the Pacific coast. Further inland, its distribution is patchy, and it is mostly limited to sites with sufficient soil moisture.  The expect this taxon to be down listed to Least Concern within the next 10 years provided that current conservation actions are successful and maintained. Until then, it is assessed as Near Threatened on the basis that its recent decline almost meets the criterion B2ab(iii) for listing as threatened. Although POC has a narrow geographic range, it occupies many different environments. 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Bakuchi: Uses, Skin Benefits, Dosage & Side Effects
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Garden Equipment in Ireland | Coughlan Garden Equipment
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Pinus greggii - Gregg's pine, Gregg pine, Pino Chino, Pino Garabato, Pino Ocote, Pino Prieto (Spanish)
Conservation Status Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable Pinus greggii's extent of occurrence is beyond the thresholds for a threatened category. The area of occupancy is more than 500 km2, but less than 2,000 km2. There are a total of eight locations and the population is severely fragmented. A substantial decline has occurred, and is continuing to occur, in the southern subpopulation (Pinus greggii var. australis) which represents the majority of the total population. There is a lesser ongoing decline in the northern subpopulation (Pinus greggii var. greggii). Consequently the species is assessed as Vulnerable. It is nowhere abundant in its scattered range, and always occurs mixed with e.g. Quercus, Platanus, Liquidambar, and Fraxinus, other pines, e.g. Pinus patula, Pinus pseudostrobus, Pinus teocote, Pinus montezumae, and Pinus arizonica var. stormiae, with Pinus cembroides and Juniperus flaccida on dry sites, and at higher and more mesic locations with Abies vejarii, Pseudotsuga menziesii, or Cupressus lusitanica. Deforestation and to a lesser extent general logging in pine forests are the main threats to this species. Although locally exploited with other pines, Gregg's Pine is not specifically in demand as a timber tree in Mexico. In many areas it has been severely depleted by general logging and overexploitation of forests. Foresters from abroad are taking an interest in its potential as a forest plantation tree in other countries; it has been introduced for that purpose in (among other countries) India, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Argentina, and Brazil. Like another, and probably related, "closed-cone" pine, Pinus radiata, it seems to grow much faster in trial plots than several other species (Dvorak and Donahue 1992). Gregg's Pine is rare in cultivation and probably restricted to botanical collections (arboreta), although in Italy it is sometimes planted as an amenity tree. Some locations are within protected areas - Sierra Gorda, Los Marmoles and Cuenca Hidrografica del Rio Necaxa Reserve. https://conifersgarden.com/rare-conifers/pinus-greggii
Do snake plants do better inside or outside?
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Ait Ben Haddou Kasbah
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How To Grow A Beautiful Oxycardium Plant At Home
Some indoor plants such as money plants are quite popular among Gardeners. Philodendron or Oxycardium plants are a great choice for those who don’t have sufficient time to care for plants. They are harder to kill and it is very easy to keep them healthy. Oxycardium plants are available in a variety of beautiful shades. They are suitable to keep as cheerful bushy plants or graceful trailers. You should know everything to grow a beautiful Oxycardium plant at home. Light One of the best aspects of Oxycardium plants' versatility is that they can thrive in low light conditions although they grow faster and produce more leaves when receiving medium to indirect light. But don't place them in direct sunlight. Watering Oxycardium plants can be grown in soil or just in water. Water them when half of the soil is dry while growing in soil. The leaves of Oxycardium appear wilted when it needs water. After watering plants they will show a perky appearance. If the leaves of plants are getting yellow and brown then it is an indication of overwatering and underwatering consequently. Philodendrons can be grown in a container with just water. Check the water closely; Oxycardium soaks the water faster than you anticipate. Don't change the medium of the plant either you are growing it in soil or water. The plant will not do well transferred to another medium. Location A south or west-facing window is the best for a philodendron plant. This is the best place where plants will get the right amount of light to thrive and will be protected from direct sunlight. You can also place It inside balconies. Repotting Oxycardium plants should be repotted when they become root bound around every two to three years. Plant them in well-aerated soil for good drainage. If you want a decorative pot for your Oxycardium plant then simply plant them in a Terracotta pot first and keep it inside the decorative pot. Using some pebbles in the bottom of the decorative pot will keep the Oxycardium plant from sitting in water. Fertilization Philodendrons can survive without fertilizer for years. However, you can fertilize them monthly because they are fast-growing plants. Use a half-strength solution of houseplant food in the spring and summer season once a month. In fall and winter, use fertilizer after every other month. The best time for fertilization is when the plant is producing new leaves. Pruning Oxycardium plant is perfect for hanging planters for table plants; they also can be enjoyed as trailing plants. Regular pruning is helpful to keep the plant lush and full. To promote bushy ness and encourage new growth, cut the leggy trails after a node. Use pruning shears or fingernails for pruning and make smooth cuts rather than Jagged. Propagation Oxycardium plants are very easy to propagate. Just pinch or cut a branch having at least a couple of nodes. Directly put the cutting into the water or soil and it will begin to grow very soon. Toxicity The Oxycardium plant is toxic and this is the main drawback to this plant. It can cause severe discomfort if ingested by pets or humans. They can feel the symptoms of burning and swelling on the lips, tongue, throat, vomiting, and diarrhea. The SAP of the plant also can cause skin irritation. Some common problems Curling leaves Curling leaves is the indication that the plant is not getting enough water. It can also occur due to overwatering because it drowns the roots. If the leaves are dropping or turning yellow, it is a sign of overwatering to solve this problem; water your plants less frequently. Insufficient amounts of water can cause the leaves of plants to turn brown. Don't keep long gaps between waterings. If the leaves turn brown then start watering them more and they will cure soon. Styling tip The large heart-shaped leaves of the philodendron plant add life to your living space. Oxycardium plants not only make your living room feel more tropical but also add texture and color to it. Use hanging planters or let it climb the walls with the help of trellis. Flexible trailing vines and large glossy heart-shaped leaves will make your living space more stylish.