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古老肉 (Sweet and Sour Pork)

[ gǔlǎo ròu ] Today's post is actually a Cantonese offering but you'll just as easily find this dish in restaurants across China and it tends to be really popular with foreigners so I figured I ought to include it! The sauce, believe it or not, is based predominantly on ketchup and includes a LOT of sugar so it's not entirely surprising that this is more of a hit with the foreigners than the locals but either way, if you're looking for something a little closer to home, you can't go wrong here.
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