koreaculture
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KIMCHI QUESADILLAS?!?!?!

So - you're thinking, kimchi and cheese. What the heck is she thinking? This isn't just a recipe which tastes so delicious, but it's gaining it's popularity around the country. This recipe was actually invented and sold by the Kogi BBQ truck in LA, CA and was printed in the October issue of "Gourmet." Thousands of Californians visit the Kogi truck just to get a taste of this delicious Korean-Spanish food fusion. Interested? Here's the recipe. Ingredients: 2 tablespoons butter 1 cup cabbage kimchi, drained and chopped 4 fresh perilla or shiso leaves (optional) 2 (8-inch) flour tortillas 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted 1 cup grated Sharp Cheddar 1 cup grated Monterey Jack 1 tablespoon Canola oil Steps: 1) Add the butter to a large skillet over medium-high heat. When melted, and the kimchi. Cook to about 6 minutes, stirring occassionally, until the edges of the kimchi start to turn a little golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and let cool for a few minutes. 2) Divide the kimchi, cheese, sesame seeds, and perilla leaves (optional) between the two tortillas. Fold each tortilla in half. 3) Pour the oil into a large skillet set over medium heat. Add both folded tortilla to the skillet, cover, and cook for about 2 minutes per-side, or until they are golden browned and the cheese has melted. 4) Slice into serving portions, and serve. Good luck!
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"What the heck is she thinking?" didn't go through my mind at all ... more like - "OMG how do I make this?"
@enjoying I wanna try! :9
This sounds delicious! I've heard of Kalbi tacos but since I dont eat meat I've never tried one, but I can eat this!!
OMG I have GOT to try this haha
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