3 years ago
mcgraffy
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Do Bass Really Rely on Waters of a Certain Temperature?
Bass don't always stay in a certain temperature of water. During spawning, they may do so, but they usually prefer to focus on food, not temperature, to decide where to stay. Peak efficiency for the bass actually occurs around 82 degrees (don't ask, I read it somewhere) but basically all that matters is that this tells us that bass are quite content to be in warm waters. What's not happy in warm waters is the bass's food supply, such as threadfin shad or crayfish. They don't do well in warm water, and move to cooler waters, taking the bass with them and away from the shallow zones. Finding bass is notoriously difficult, but one surefire way to get better at it is by really understanding how bass act, and why they do so. Bass move a lot in the summer because they are eating more, and feeding more. Because of this, you might not always find them where you found them the day before. Finding large structure is key to locating schools in hot weather. If you stop getting bites, move along the structure. The most ideal is a creek or river channel because it is usually large and provides a current, as well as being near deep water, all of which are important for bass. Submerged islands, roadbeds and more can do a good job of supporting actively feed bass schools. Heavy vegetation in shallow water will also support actively feeding bass, as long as the vegetation is alive. Since they're feeding a lot, active lures will attract the most bass during hot weather. This basically describes a diving, lipped crank plug pulled with a fast retrieve. In fact, this type lure has proven to be the most effective method for taking large quantities of largemouth bass during the heat of summer. Remember, during hot weather, a rapidly-fished lure is always vastly more productive than one presented slowly. So go fishing, even if its hot!
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