3 years ago
mcgraffy
in English · 7,113 Views
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Initial Water Entry for Bass Pitching or Flipping
When first hitting the water, I often like to make a big loud and dramatic sound. Yes, that's gonna be startling for the fish. If I can hit tree trunks, thick limbs, and emergent rocks on my cast out, great! Think of it like hitting the backboard when shooting a basketball.Even if there are reeds or brush, I kind of like that first pitch to get hung up a few inches above the waterline, giving me an opportunity to rustle the reeds or brush, thereby getting the attention of any big bass lurking in the vicinity. If the weeds are thick, pitch to the edge of the weedbed, and either burn it back over the weed rim or sometimes shake it in the lettuce a bit, and then pop my jig over the weed edge and drop it into open water. This can only all be done on the VERY FIRST CAST to the best looking spot where you think bass are going to be. On second, third, and subsequent casts, I often tone down to a silent, splashless entry. Remember that you've gotta use that initial entry to excite the fish--if you don't take advantage of this, you're not fishing smart enough! It really gets the fish excited.
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4 comments
Now I see why you like to make a lot of noise--but really, it seems counter intuitive! is there any situation where you don't make a lot of noise? @mcgraffy
3 years ago·Reply
10
Great tips! I try to make a lot of noise but sometimes just end up getting myself tangled up.
3 years ago·Reply
10
@happyrock oh, plenty :) but I always make noise on thr first pitching cast. remember that. if the fish are incredibly spookish, tone it down @yakwithalan it can be a pain, but usually you learn how to shake em down
3 years ago·Reply
@mcgraffy alright, I'll see how it works for me
3 years ago·Reply