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A book box by AUST & AMELUNG

‘a book box’ presents the beloved, yet long-not-read, book mounted to the wall. Framed and exhibited, it is presented with a new functionality. Opened, the book covers the contents inside. Closing the book opens the box. The book turns into a trap door that reveals a storage area or secret compartment.
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Woah I like the ability to have them rest at all different angels!
I love creative storage like this.
This needs to be in my house right now
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