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Kemajuan Teknlogi Masa Kini

Dewasa ini, dunia telah mengalami perubahan mendasar dari segi penggunaan teknologi dalam kehidupan, mulai dari ekonomi hingga politik semuanya berubah menuju arah perubahan teknologi.

Diiringi dengan meluasnya penggunaan internet di dunia, bahkan di beberapa negara berkembang pertambahan pengguna internet mencapai 200%.

Hal inilah yang menuntut kita semua untuk terus meng-upgrade diri menambah skill dan kemampuan kita untuk "bersaing" dengan teknlogi modern itu.

Begitu juga dengan perkembangan dunia internet yang berdampak munculnya berbagai situs yang cukup bermanfaat seperti Pres News yang bisa dijadikan sumber informasi berharga seputar teknologi dan gadget.
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The story behind the most expensive gourmet coffee in the world: Kopi luwak
The life of a civet cat, strangely known as the coffee rat in Indonesia or tree dog on the Indian subcontinent, is not at all that bad. In the wild, they are free to roam anywhere they fancy, from the tropical forests of Sri Lanka all the way to the dense jungles of Sumatra. They are solitary creatures for most of their lives, but are persnickety eaters and thus discard rotten fruit and diseased mammals. The males get together with their female counterparts whenever they have to, receiving the better end of the deal by mating with no strings attached. They are nocturnal save for when a bright moon comes out. Then they sleep all night like they normally do during the day. And as long as their intestinal tracts remain fully functioning, they will continue pooing out a tradable commodity, one that also happens to produce the most expensive gourmet coffee in the world: the kopi luwak. There are over a hundred types of coffee in the world but only three -- Arabica, robusta and liberica -- are farmed exhaustively and made commercially available. The luwak coffee can be made from all three types but result in varying tastes. The Arabica bean in Indonesia is the most popular for the luwak blend, as well as for non-specialty coffee consumption. With a name like “cat-poo-ccino” and Jerry Seinfeld’s blunt “cat shit coffee” description from his hit TV show, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, the luwak and its history in Indonesia is nevertheless by no means a laughing matter. Before the introduction of coffee plantations, civet cats and coffee production were an unlikely pair. The civet cat was in fact a creepy pest scurrying over rooftops and eating prize-winning tajen cocks. Their utility hadn’t been explored at all as coffee “fermenters” and their fecal matter was a mere inconvenience to the villager, as is dog crap to the jogger in New York City. The luwak’s prodigious poo-coffee discovery came when the Dutch launched their cultuurstelsel program of enforced coffee planting in Java in the 19th century. Due to exploitative practices, the local indigenous workers were forbidden to enjoy the fruits of their own labor. Of course, prohibition piques interest and so the workers gave their beans a go, but only after they were passed through the guts of the civets running amok on the plantation fields. Fast-forward one hundred and some years. In 2012, the value of coffee exports from Indonesia reached US $1.5 Billion. Seventy percent of Indonesia’s total coffee production was exported, yet how much the luwak contributed to that figure is largely unknown. Regardless, being a highly sought after specialty blend, cat poo coffee has proven to be a lucrative business attracting global consumers for its rich taste, as well as its novelty factor -- sometimes more of the latter than the former. Its labor-intensive production process, as well as scarcity on the global market, drives up its price to anywhere from $300 to $600 per kilogram, making it the most expensive coffee in the world. A cup in the US can go anywhere from $50 to $80. Though coffee estates are seeing a decline in Indonesia, large-scale “wild-sourced” luwak plantations are still in operation, mostly in Sumatra. There are also the small backyard ventures popping up here and there that are proving to be quite profitable enterprises. Harmoni Bali Organik is an example of a successful homegrown luwak plant run by Kadek Ardhi, 54, and Santhi, 51 -- a husband and wife team. They operate right from their traditional Balinese home in Bangli where civet cats roam naturally in the forests and are even brought in by farmers in exchange for a 25-kilogram bag of rice. Unlike the coffee’s history, Kadek and Santhi’s roots in the business are not as deep. “In 2006, I had a Japanese visitor who recommended I merge business with pleasure,” says Kadek, 54, while sliding a tray of Arabica cherries into a civet cat’s cage. “At that time I had only two civets and I kept them just for fun. But he recommended that I breed them and so my capacity quickly grew to 18. Every month I was visited by my Japanese friend who inspected the cages -- now I have 94 luwak and I export my special coffee to Canada and Japan.” The production of kopi luwak is by no means a complicated process. The civet cat sleeps all day with their eyes creepily open and wakes up around sundown. Santhi and her team then begin sliding trays of about a kilogram of Arabica cherries to each cat for dinner. They gorge until satiated, defecate, circle their cages for a bit and then go back to sleep. It was a surprise to see that they meticulously sift through the best cherries -- a selling point that inflates their price tags because of this ability to distinguish good beans from bad. Surprisingly, they spit out the fruit, which is then collected and used as organic fertilizer -- sometimes even dumped on the side of the road next to the plantations where the cherries originated. Their feces are collected in a sieve from right under them in the mornings. The cleaning process begins by laying out the feces on trays in the open sun. “We don’t use water in cleaning the feces,” says Santhi. “The sun does the cleaning through drying and it takes anywhere from one to two weeks, depending on the sun.” Much debate surrounds the luwak coffee’s taste, with many experts asserting that the quality is in fact quite poor and nothing to be excited about. Some connoisseurs swear over the coffee and will go out of their way to make a purchase. Some claim the taste to be less bitter and earthier, yet the overall quality and robustness of flavor varies widely region by region. For Santhi, luwak coffee from Java and Sumatra is spicy while from Kintamani it is a bit more acidic. Nowadays, the kopi luwak can be seen as a business model of micro-economy interconnectedness. Take Santhi and Kadek Ardhi’s plant, for example. Coffee cherries are purchased from a Kintamani farmer and arrive every day at the same time before sundown: two bags weighing anywhere from 95 to 100 kilograms. They hire local help to feed and tend the cats, maintain the cages and package the final product, which then goes to what many might consider a sampling showroom, or sales point, for tourists, in a forest near Ubud. However, one drawback to luwak production is that the Arabica bean is ripe from April to June in lower altitudes (700 to 900 meters) and from April until September in higher altitudes (900 to 1200 meters or even more), such as in Kintamani. Despite a season-dependent output, Santhi and Kadek still manage to produce 25 kilograms per month for the international market, as well as 50 kilograms for the domestic one. However, luwak or not, the irony is that coffee in Indonesia appears to be unpopular. According to investment statistics in 2012 the per capita consumption was relatively low at 0.95 kilograms, compared to Finland where it was 11.7 kilograms. Unscientifically and by observation only, it seems that the artificial variety is preferred by Indonesian consumers, a powdery kind, which in fact has less coffee and more sugar with creamer -- a blend that is atrociously sweet and lacks real flavor and effect. Coffee culture has yet to catch up, although domestic numbers are slowly growing. All in all, the luwak coffee, or any other Indonesian-grown coffee for that matter, is worth boasting about and for thumbing the nation’s nose at the ex-colonizers.
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Magnificent Madakaripura
If you don’t take a picture it never happened, or so it seems nowadays with the popularity of selfies and all and sundry owning a selfie stick. But with the popularity of most tourist sites it’s hard to get a composition that doesn’t include someone in the background. However, Madakaripura falls provides an all-natural backdrop without another soul for miles. Dubbed as the final meditation place of Gajah Mada, the elephant general of the Majapahit Empire, a visit to the misty, streaming falls is the ideal post-Mount Bromo excursion: It offers a much less strenuous experience than climbing up the 250 steps to the sulfur caldera. The falls are located roughly 35 kilometers from Bromo near a village called Sapih and can be reached via Jl. Raya Bromo to Lumbang on the way to Probolinggo. It is a pleasant ride — ideally on motorcycle — on which you will find yourself unconsciously pressing the brakes as the villages you pass on the snaking mountainous roads are enshrouded in lush and equally mesmerizing greenery. Five kilometers away from the waterfall’s parking lot a man will appear from what seems to be a bus stop and will charge the entrance fee of Rp 3,000 (3 US cent). A narrow dirt road flanked by banana and durian trees along with casuarina and some colorful apiaries will lead you to another “check point” which is unchecked and abandoned with a permanently raised barrier. From there, it is another kilometer to the stall-laden parking lot with a statue of the great Gajah Mada in the lotus position and an empty fountain sitting dryly right in the middle of it. Be assertive and be on your guard. No sooner than alighting and touts will hound you. The trail however is quite visible making the falls easily accessible. A guide is in fact not necessary but if you choose one — or passively allow one to latch on to you — the cost will range anywhere from Rp 100,000. There have been instances of groups being charged over Rp 400,000, an outrageous price especially for a local doing nothing more than hold your hand when crossing the river. Negotiating is as advisable as bringing common sense since the area is still wild and mildly challenging to get through. You may have to cross the river about five times in total so proper footwear is essential as some rocks are deceivingly slippery. En route you will also encounter a number of stalls selling fried bananas, kopi panas (hot coffee) and tempeh (fermented soya bean cake) as well as hawkers selling ponchos for the stretch of trail which is rained on by bigger streams of cold and refreshing water. Do bring your own raincoat, unless you don’t mind getting drenched and riding home using the wind as your natural blow dryer. After a kilometer trek you will find yourself wading anywhere from shin-deep ripples to a mid-chest pool before getting to the lagoon, the hidden reward for your hard work. This last step requires clambering over a crest of rocks. There, the 200 meter-high waterfalls reveals itself in full showing how the canyon is really like a special chamber of sorts of all things natural. Apart from the several waterfall cascades, when light pours in at the appropriate time of day it illuminates the basin making the cliff’s fauna even brighter and more vibrant in color. The rushing water makes it difficult to hear and the large boulders lining the river are reminiscent of dinosaur eggs. It isn’t recommended to visit during the wet season as the water gets pretty muddy and the risk of flooding and landslides are much greater. Though we didn’t see any macaque monkeys, I heard that in fact it’s a good thing—they sometimes toss rocks off the cliff’s edge. But don’t worry, helmets are not required and if they were, I’m sure there would be several hawkers renting them out for a nominal fee. Finding yourself away from the frenzy of shutter-pressing tourists will make you really appreciate the pristine waterfalls and the feeling of being like Indiana Jones trekking right into the heart of the jungle. Crossing barefoot a river and pushing through branches sticking out into the pathway, your only obstacle to good times and people-free selfies!
How To Make Mee Goreng Mamak (印度炒面), Fried Noodles with Indo-Malayan Flair
I love Indonesian food. Based on their history and interactions with the rest of Asia, the cuisine has subtle nods to Chinese, Thai, and Indian dishes, but with their own special (and usually nice and spicy) twist. Mee goreng is perhaps my favorite of the Indo-Malayan dishes. From the picture, it looks like a standard chow mein-esque stir fry, but the flavor involved is absolutely incredible and definitely sets it apart from its 'noodle cousins'. (Especially when you top it with fried onion pieces and just the right amount of sesame oil.) Mee goreng is such a popular dish that you can buy instant packages of it all over Asia. In fact, I have some friends who lived in Western Africa that enjoyed instant mee goreng as a steady staple through the week. (You can buy instant mee goreng at a majority of Asian supermarkets in America, but try this recipe for the real deal and super authentic stuff!) ------------------------------------------------------ Mee Goreng Mamak (Fried Noodles) 500 grams of yellow noodles Handfuls of beansprouts depend on liking 2 small tomatoes, quartered 2 small onions, chopped Handful of chicken breast meat, thinly sliced, or minced beef 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1 potato, boiled and cut into cubes 1 small size dry bean curd, cut into small pieces 3 tablespoons of cooking oil (I usually use soybean.) 1 tablespoons of minced green onion and garlic 2 fish cakes, sliced (optional) Handful of shrimp, de-shelled and de-veined, optional 1 green chili or Thai chili or red cut chili, optional 3 tablespoons of ketchup 3 tablespoons of chili sauce or chili paste 1 tablespoon of dark soy sauce 1 tablespoon of light soy sauce 1 teaspoon of garam masala/curry/turmeric powder, optional (but highly recommended!) For garnishing (optional): Some cucumber slices Some fresh coriander leaves or green onion Some lime or Calamansi lime (cut into half) Some deep fried shallots Some grounded peanut + sugar mixture Sesame oil 1. Assemble all the ingredients that need to chopped or sliced. In a big frying pan, sauté the onion and minced garlic until fragrant. Add in turmeric or Garam Masala (if preferred). Add the chicken breast/minced beef, stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the dry bean curd, fish cakes and potato cubes. 2. Add in the yellow noodles and stir fry until well mixed. If the yellow noodles is too dry, add about 1/4 cup of water. Add the tomatoes, prawns, tomato ketchup, chili sauce or paste, freshly cut green/red chili (if any). Stir fry until well combined (about 2-3 minutes). 3. Add in the beaten egg, sugar and salt to taste, followed by the beans sprout. Stir fry until the beaten eggs dries up. Off the heat and transfer to the serving plate. Top with sesame oil to taste.
Bandung's most popular desserts on Instagram
One of Bandung's traits that keeps attracting visitors, especially from Jakarta, is its always-exciting culinary adventure. During the 1980s, it was the baso tahu goreng or batagor for short (fried fish and tofu eaten with peanut sauce) and an array of pastries and cakes from big bakeries that were the sought-after food souvenirs from Bandung. Nowadays however, continuing the city’s legacy of always moving forward and creating new trends, new hybrid foodpreneurs are emerging; offering a totally new style and concept in desserts, which are not only exciting and show creativity but also genius in pampering our taste buds. Though not all of them have managed to establish a store, all are creating a lot of buzz on social media, especially on Instagram. So, prepare to savor these treats when you are in town. Pompidou Think about pretty, elegant, and at the same time modern cakes or cupcakes, which upon eating will give you a lot of happiness for the soft and delicious texture combined with a satisfying creamy buttery icing. That's what Pompidou, a little cake shop at Jl. Ciliwung 14, is all about. Founded in 2009 by Irma and Arthy, the duo started out by receiving custom-order cupcakes for friends or family. Their interest in cakes and cupcakes began after reading a red velvet cake recipe in a Martha Stewart cookbook. Pompidou now offers cakes, cupcakes and pies, starting from Rp 18,000 per cupcake. Pompidou's chocomalt cake, red velvet and salted caramel cake, are among their best-sellers. Fat Bites Astrid and her partner have a passion for food and so the two often experiment to create new exciting dishes. The duo's exploration later resulted in an online-based business named Fat Bites which offers their product through an Instagram account. "We wanted to explore new tastes and flavors of food and beverages as well as new unexpected ways to present them," said Astrid about her business. At the moment, she said, Fat Bites offered ice creams, sorbets and pies. The varieties are quite rich with cheese cake, Oreo, apple caramel, vanilla, bubble gum for the ice cream and strawberry punch and lavender lime for the sorbets and banana soufflé, strawberry soufflé and salmon wasabi for the pies. According to Astrid, Fat Bites' signature and best-selling menu item are Summerfling, which is a lychee drink with fruit popsicle, the fruit and ice cream S'more -- ice cream with butter cookies and melted marshmallow -- and the salmon wasabi pie. "Currently we still do a lot of pop-up events and participate in culinary festivals. But we have a pick-up point for our customers who order through our LINE account or email, which is at Jl. Bagus Rangin No. 7," Astrid explained, adding a requirement of three days’ notice for customer orders. TnC Chef Kamal's tiramisu is more than just a delicious dessert dish but also a success story amid hard times. His tiramisu dish started gaining popularity in 1997, but then the monetary crisis hit and Chef Kamal, who worked in a hotel as a pastry chef at the time, tried to join the line of street cafes that emerged in the Dago area, as a response to the crisis and a demand for new affordable eateries. To his surprise, his hotel-quality tiramisu, which sold at an affordable price, started to gain popularity. Long story short, five years later Chef Kamal decided to quit his job and started his own business called TnC (Tiramisu and Coffee) by Chef Kamal at Jl. Sawah Kurung IV No. 14. Following the trend of social media, TnC also set up an account on Twitter and Instagram, resulting in a new batch of younger customers who praised his tiramisu and proudly posted the experience online. Arromanis Armita Sunaryo had never baked a single cake in her life before. But the global trend and craving for red velvet cake in 2011 sparked her curiosity. So she Googled and YouTubed and tried out one recipe and had great luck with a result that was delicious. As a person who actually doesn't really enjoy sweet treats, Armita then developed recipes using low-fat milk and less sugar, resulting in a healthier product for everybody to enjoy but still offering some indulgence in the flavor. At first, Armita used social media to market Arromanis. From word of mouth, Arromanis became more popular so that in January 2014, Armita finally established a small shop at Jl. Wira Angun–Angun 14. The most favorite items from the Arromanis Corner Shop are the banoffee pie and matcha whoopie pie which sell around 500 pieces per month. The Wooden Spoon Founded late last year by Amy Fahmi, The Wooden Spoon (TWS) offers mouthwatering but lower-in-fat as well as halal versions of the Italian panna cottas. Amy's version of the dessert dish comes with vanilla, almond and hazelnut flavors and up to 12 choices of toppings such as latte macchiato, summer berry coulis and yoghurt, and apple sauce and cookie crumble -- all priced at Rp 165,000 (US$13.53) per half-dozen. Thanks to interesting promotion through Instagram, TWS’ business has grown quite fast in less than a year with around 800 to 1,200 cups of panna cottas sold per month. According to Amy, loyal customers from Jakarta regularly order her panna cottas and have them delivered to the capital city. Cokelatia Mila Savitri, an architect and foodie, posted on her Path account a batch of chewy green-tea cookies topped with white chocolate. She raved that the treat was superbly delicious and she was proud to be among the first customers who savored the new product from Cokelatia. But before the chewy cookies, it was Cokelatia's RockyBars that were so popular and established many loyal fans. Tia, founder of Cokelatia, the small company she runs with her sibling Poji, started out the business as a hobby. Tia blogged about her fascination for chocolate and baking cakes on her blogspot site, Cokelatia, and started to receive orders from friends and family. Among the orders, she noticed that her RockyBars -- which offer an interesting new look and taste from the usual brownies -- were really sought after. So, in 2012, Tia and her husband and Poji, founded a small business dedicated to selling their RockyBars. At first they sold RockyBars online. But several months later they started to rent a space at Jl. Raden Patah 12 in Bandung and created the RockyBars' Open Kitchen where they baked and provided a customer order pick-up point. From the original RockyBars, now Cokelatia has created many variants of RockyBars and also a new product called ChewyCookies. Actively participating in Bandung's chic culinary festivals such as Keuken, Cokelatia offers menu items such as the RockySundae, which mixes RockyBars and ice cream and always turns out to be one of the crowds' favorites.