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BTS Secret Drink Menu: BTS Cafe
Que tal peeps! Storyline... Welcome to my BTS cafe. I was able to open this up due to the fat pockets of my husband Jimin Park (big smile). Today I will share our secrect drink menu only for fellow ARMY peeps! Enjoy! Menu according to stans... Namjoon Stans Neapolitan Frappe We all know Namjoon likes all types of ladies so this would fit him well with three tasty flavors as the base. Jin Stans Strawberry Chesscake Frappe We all know pink is his color since he is called the pink princess. It was just his fate to also be the strawberry chesscake princess as well. Yoongi Stans... All Cream Frappe Yoongi is know for that creamy flawless skin. This drink is like having Yoongi in slow small sips.... Hobi stans Strawberry Lemonade Frappe We all know Hobi is the burst of bright light in the group! This drink will awaken your taste buds just like Hobi would (take this statement as you want lol)! Jimin stans... The Nutella Now we all know papi chulo loves chocolate! He has said this many times. This drink is him all day! V stans.... Captian Crunch V is super out there thats why ARMY has nicknamed him alien. This drink is something outside the box. Jungkook stans Tuxedo Mocha This half creme half mocha drink is super smooth just like Jungkook's moves. Plus ot is half light and dark like Jungkook. He can never figure out if he wants to be good or naughty! Next Menu is Yoongi's Menu Now I shared this before on vingle ages ago. Credit to creator. Next we have aummer drinks that will be gone quick try them while you can... (credit to creator). Feeling Low? Try our energy drinks for the low price of your soul! Just kidding we will accept ARMY tears of joy though lol!! DRINK UP!! ALCOHOL SHOTS FOR 21+ BUT WE DO HAVE THEM IN THE BACK... IN ALL SERIOUSNESS DRINKS ABOVE ARE STARBUCKS DRINKS. AMS Unicorn Taglist @strawberrylover @sukkyongwanser @TaeSky @divanicola05 @BabydollBre @SimplyAwkward @QueenPandaBunny @Vay754 @MissMinYoongi @EvilGenius @punkpandabear @Seera916 @VeronicaArtino @RKA916 @jiminakpop @PolarStarr @jjrockstar @SarahHibbs @kitkatkpop @simpsonsamantha @AraceliJimenez @SweetDuella @CArcelia @Gracielou0717 @DefSoul1994 @EvodiaEbraheem @JustBrea @FernandaMedina @aliendestina @KayLeeRose94 @IsoldaPazo @AgentLeo @Starbell808 @KoizuniHime19 @AlexisJ15 @impulsegurl666 @MonieManhiM @EvodiaEbraheem @Ttwolf74 @gyapitt @StephaniePoore @AsystolinaTawan @Indiglow @krystalrikpop
Confession: I'm Addicted To Trying Strange Asian Foods.
Hi, my name is Dani, and I'm a foodie - but only when it comes to all things weird. As those of you who participate in my weekly So Good Or No Good food game, I'm always interested in talking about gross food combinations and dishes that, well, require a certain kind of palette. I thought it might be fun to create a list of strange international foods I've tried that maybe other people wouldn't be into - some left me wanting seconds, and well, others definitely had me running to the bathroom. Have you tried any of these? Century Eggs (China) Century eggs - also known as pidan - get their name because they are soaked and preserved for long periods of times (traditionally, several months) before they're eaten. What normally looks like a regular white and yellow boiled egg turns into translucent black with a consistency kind of like Jell-O. I thought these were surprisingly delicious. Once you get over the fact that the eggs are black and have a different smell than a normal hard-boiled egg, you'll find that it's still really tasty! Pork Dinuguan (Philippines) Dinuguan looks like a pretty unassuming stew with a color is reminiscent of a Mexican mole sauce, but the taste couldn't be any more different. It's made with anything from standard pork to more questionable parts like the lungs, kidneys, intestines, ears, heart, or snout, and it's all simmered in pig blood. As far as this one's concerned, I was able to make it through a few bites, but the texture and the heavy iron-flavor of the jellied pig blood sauce really grossed me out. (However, my Filipino friends insist this can be SUPER delicious, so I'm waiting for their moms to make me some!) Yukhoe (South Korea) There's really not much to explain when it comes to yukhoe. It's ground raw beef served with raw egg and a variety of seasonings. Sometimes it's served as you see in the picture above, and other times, it's over rice with an assortment of vegetables as 'yukhoe bibimbap'. Yukhoe is actually really delicious! First, I was scared because there's so much 'NOPE!' here, but yukhoe is served cold, so the beef flavor is mild. Also, the seasoning does a good job of keeping you from feeling like you're shoveling raw hamburger meat in your mouth. (Make sure you're ordering yukhoe at a reputable place so you don't get sick!) Natto (Japan) Natto is a fermented soybean dish that is traditionally served at breakfast. With a stringy consistency and a strong odor, it's known to be an acquired taste - even within Japan! Natto is often served plain, but you can also see it rolled up onigiri-style. I couldn't get past the first bite or two plain, but I will say that eating it with soy sauce and mustard (which is often provided when you order natto), definitely helps you get it down. Yeah, this was a once-and-never-again dish for me. Zhū ěr duo (China) Zhū ěr duo is a popular Chinese appetizer of sliced braised pig ear, commonly served both hot or cold. The outer skin is chewy and soft, while the strip of cartilage has a crunch that might be unfamiliar to people trying it for the first time. Personally, I felt like the texture took me a bite or two to get used to, but once I had, I actually found pig ear to be pretty good! I don't know if I could eat a whole lot of this, but it's really nice as an appetizer. Dalkbal (South Korea) Dalkbal is a dish popularly served as something of a pub snack in South Korea. It's chicken feet prepared in a spicy sauce of red pepper paste and sesame oil. Overall, it's light and meaty, but definitely has plenty of crunchy cartilage inside. Dalkbal is super spicy! I don't think I realized I was such a heat wimp until I tried it for the first time. The cartilage gets in the way of it being anything close to filling, but it's a great snack, especially for you beer and hot wings types. So now I want to know about the unusual foods YOU'VE tried. Share your own stories! Is there a food in your family's culture that a lot of people outside of it wouldn't be into? Are there strange foods you were scared to try, but actually liked eating a lot? Let us know in the comments below!
How-To: Crack Chicken
My Crack Chicken sauce recipe for all you lovers of chicken that's savory and sweet at the same time! This is something REALLY SIMPLE that you can make for Valentine's Day that you can eat alone or with a loved one. Crack Chicken Sauce: 1 1/2 C Sweet n Sour marinade/sauce 1/2 C Soy sauce 1/2 C Ketchup 1/3 C Plum Sauce 1/4 C Sherry/rice wine Whisk together. Set aside. Chicken Prep: 1/2 Cup chopped red onion (or more) 2 Garlic cloves (or more) boneless chicken cut into pieces. (I prefer thighs as these have richer flavor and remain moist unlike white meat.) Cooking Chicken: In a wide sauce pan add a couple tablespoons of sesame oil Drop in minced garlic and onions. Aromatics cook about 1-2 minutes Pat chicken dry then add salt and pepper Drop chicken into pan (make sure chicken touches pan and not lumped all over) DON'T STIR IT! Let it sit 60-90 seconds Flip--DON'T STIR IT! Cook 60-90 seconds Chicken is not cooked--don't worry! Blot excess moisture with a paper towel--BE CAREFUL! Pour HALF of Crack Chicken Sauce and stir--reduce heat and cover until chicken is cooked. Won't take long--maybe 10 minutes. Watch it. Add salt and pepper as needed to taste. Let me know if you try this and if you like it. Also, if you have any great recommendations or alterations to this recipe, let me know! @jordanhamilton @AlloBaber @humairaa @jcl4rks0n @AimeBolanos @alywoah @CiciRoman @paulisaghost @LizArnone @lisbt92 @Dragon0fTime @KassamRajput @Arellano1052 @ChangThao @YlianaVera @BuffyFHK @Dynamo @GiGie @JayllaMarie @MableWaddles
How To Make Halayang Ube, A Sweet Purple Yam Dessert from the Philippines
I lived in the same house for most of my childhood in North Jersey, as did a majority of the neighbors on my block. We played together, walked to school together, attended each other's baptisms and birthdays and Independence Day barbecues, and pretty much grew together like family. My Cuban neighbors taught me how to dance merengue. On Sundays, my Syrian neighbors often took us with them to their Assyrian Orthodox church. And my Korean neighbors introduced us to Lunar New Year, decorating their front step every February. My Filipino neighbors, however, were the ones who always had the best parties. The adults would be dancing in the back yard and singing hours of karaoke, while the kids all crowded around the living room couch while we took turns playing Sonic The Hedgehog. When it was time to eat, there would be giant trays of lumpia, pancit canton, and on the most special occasions, lechon - a whole roasted pig. All of the food would be seriously amazing, but my favorite was the halayang ube, a sweet and sticky cake made with sweetened condensed milk and the pulp of ube, a type of purple yam. Fast-forward to July 4th,1999, my last day living in New Jersey. We had a huge neighborhood party complete with fireworks and food and all of the kids on the block playing games together. When it was time for everyone to say goodbye, one of the things that Maggie, the mother of the Filipino family, did was give my mother a small package of purple yam ube powder and the halayang ube recipe because she knew it was my favorite. To this day, I really, really miss Maggie, her family, and the years we spent together, so when I am able to make halayang ube, I can't help but feel incredibly sentimental. To make this recipe, which calls for actual ube yams, you may have to go to a Filipino market or a grocery store that offers a large amount of Asian products. Contrary to what many believe, taro root and ube are not actually the same, so make sure that if you're buying frozen or powdered product to substitute, you're still buying the right one. Also, the picture has the halayang ube piled into small jars, but most people simply spread the halayang on a baking dish or plate. It may look a little messy, but it tastes great! ------------------------------------------------------------------ Halayang Ube (or Ube Halaya) 1 1/2 cups grated cooked purple yam 1 cup evaporated milk or (traditionally) coconut milk 1 14oz can condensed milk a pinch of salt 1 tablespoon butter/margarine plus extra for smoothing the cooked yam 1. Wash the purple yam thoroughly, and peel and slice it into big chunks. Boil until tender. 2. In a deep pot or saucepan, combine all the ingredients except the butter or margarine. Stir to combine well and on medium high heat, cook until the mixture thickens. You have to keep stirring while cooking to avoid lumps. It will get harder to stir as it cooks. 3. Halfway through the cooking, add a tablespoon of butter. Mix well and continue cooking until it starts to pull away from the sides of the pan/pot and when you get some, it doesn’t fall off the spoon. 4. Transfer the sweetened purple yam into well-buttered dish/dishes. Add a pat of butter on top of the mixture and using the back of a spoon, level and smooth the purple yam.