3 years ago
AgentCory
in English · 3,832 Views
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Saluting Female Video Game Pioneers
Awesome article in The New York Times shining the spotlight on some amazing women involved in video games going back to the 70's. As a girl and a gamer seeing woman in the industry, especially women connected to famous games like Portal, is really important and inspiring. While the world of video games is by no means exclusive to women these days, there is no resource that really honors their contributions, or compiles and shares the affect that they have had. There is still a biased idea that women don't belong, even when they clearly do! 22% of the video game industry is now women, a huge increase from five years ago, and that will continue to grow. And so, I hope, will the amazing games that we see out of this change! Definitely check out the article! Here's the link: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/20/arts/video-games/those-underappreciated-female-video-game-pioneers.html?ref=video-games&_r=0
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Thanks for posting this @AgentCory, I for one believe that women are underrepresented in all aspects of the video game industry. (Although I read somewhere that 45% of all gamers are female) There should be more successful female developers, notable female gamers, and female characters and options in games. I don't want to turn this positive article into a negative discussion, but there is something worth noting about greediness in the video game industry. http://www.thefineyoungcapitalists.com/ was running a campaign for female video gamers. If you were a woman, you could enter and pitch an idea for a video game. The internet would vote on the best pitch. Whoever wins gets their game made for them, or if you had programming experience you could make the game yourself. The gamer with the best idea would get 8% royalties if the game was made for her and proceeds would go to charity. One notable female game developer didn't like the contest guidelines so refused to sign the contract, but not before spreading misinformation about the competition, getting their website doxxed, getting the company banned from Twitter, and taking money from the company for Game Jam. She ruined a competition that would actually help women in gaming AND give to charity because she "didn't want to work for free." I won't say her name, but you could probably guess who it is with all the scandals going on. The gaming industry is in a very strange place right now and it's just so sad.
3 years ago·Reply
10
Sorry about the rant >.<
3 years ago·Reply
10