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Your New Favorite Tabbouleh Salad Recipe (Vegan)

I love Middle-Eastern salads. I am a big advocate of eating tons of Middle-Eastern salads when you're on a diet. Not only are all the ingredients so colorful and fresh, but the lemon, mint, and olive oil so essential to these dishes create such a perfect combination of flavors that you don't even realize just how healthfully you're eating! Tabbouleh salad is perhaps my favorite one, and I remember growing up, tabbouleh was one of those few things (minus cold pizza) that tasted arguably even better a few hours later. Similar to a panzanella salad, the wheat absorbs all the delicious ingredients if it sits a little longer! Don't believe me? Let this taboulleh sit in your fridge for at least an hour before eating it, and you'll see that it was definitely worth the wait! ------------------------------------------------------------- Tabbouleh 1/2 cup fine burghul (cracked wheat) 2 large tomatoes, diced 1 bunch green onions, chopped 4 bunches parsley, chopped 1/2 bunch mint, chopped (or 2 tbsp. dried mint) 1 large cucumber, peeled and chopped 1/2 cup olive oil Juice of 3 lemons 1 tbsp. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper Wash Burghul. Drain and place in a large bowl. Add all chopped vegetables and mix well. Add olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Mix again, and serve over fresh green lettuce. ------------------------------------------------------------- You could eat this with a fork, but perhaps my favorite way is scooping it up with leaves of romaine lettuce, slightly similar to how you would eat a lettuce wrap. It's delicious!
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@sophiamor Yeah, parsley does a really good job of getting right up in there doesn't it haha
I love Tabbouleh, just not when it gets stuck in my teeth :)
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