danidee
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Making Arabic Coffee (Kahwa) at Home + Bonus Fortune Telling Video!

The greatest experience a true 'caffeine head' can have is sitting down to a cup of Arabic coffee. Arabic coffee, often referred to as 'Turkish coffee' as well, is something my grandfather used to jokingly insist put "hair on your chest" based on its strength and thicker mouthfeel. Instead of straining the ground coffee through a French press or a standard Mr. Coffee, the coffee used for Arabic style coffee is ground into a fine powder and boiled into the water. It's definitely quite a kick! One of my favorite parts of drinking Arabic coffee growing up was having my fortune read to me from the remaining coffee grains that rested at the bottom of my cup. After we're done drinking our coffee, we flip over the small demitasse cup we're drinking it from and allow for the rest of the coffee to collect in the saucer. When you flip it back over, the 'fortune teller' of the family looks for symbols in the grinds and tells you what to expect in your future. This is, of course, just for fun, but it doesn't make it any less exciting! (Check out the attached video of a Syrian family reading one another's fortunes to see what I mean.) Here is a quick recipe for how to make Arabic coffee at home. If you don't want to invest in a brass coffee pot, you can use a regular saucepan for a similar result. ----------------------------------------------------------- Arabic Coffee (Kahwa) 2 cups water 3 to 5 tsp. sugar 6 tsp. Turkish coffee (or any medium to dark-roasted coffee ground to a powder) 3 cardamom pods or 1/8 tsp. cardamom powder 1. In a brass coffee pot or regular saucepan, bring water and sugar to boil. 2. Add coffee and cardamom, stirring constantly. When mixture comes to a boil and becomes frothy, remove from fire and stir until froth has receded. Repeat this process two more times. 3. After the coffee has foamed and subsided for the third time, pour into Arabic coffee cups (or demitasse). Serve the coffee very hot - a minute or two after pouring in cups to allow the grounds to settle in the bottom. Note: The amount of coffee and sugar may be increased or decreased to suit your taste. Makes six servings. ----------------------------------------------------------- Serve this with a fresh plate of baklava (using the recipe I posted in my 'Middle-Eastern Recipes' collection) and a small bowl of Jordan almonds for a complete Arabic style dessert spread!
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@hikaymm No problem! I knew there would be some people that would want to try this at home, so I made sure to make a point of saying you can use a regular saucepan too! The hardest part would be finding a good Turkish ground coffee, but buying Cafe Najjar or other popular brands of Arabic coffee online is fairly inexpensive.
@onesmile You can definitely find videos and articles about fortune telling if you want to become an expert on it! It'd definitely make you a hit at dinner parties. ;)
I have totally never tried the fortune telling bit?? Now I have to XD Thanks for sharing @danidee!
My cousins make Turkish coffee for me occasionally and I love it!
As much as I love coffee, Turkish coffee is too much for me. I love watching it be made though!
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