3 years ago
greggr
in English · 2,268 Views
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Do Schools Kill Creativity?
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This is a very interesting TED talk by Sir Ken Robinson. Even though I think that Robinson makes some very interesting points about how schools can prevent students from learning about what they want to learn, and instead being held only to the standards of others. And this is definitely a valid worry, but, I think that it's possible that Robinson took the idea too far. In the defense of the current school system, let's consider this: every action taken by a district, or board is the reactive response to a broad-demand by industry, by people for a systematic process of maximum efficiency and minimal waste. I think the real concern is that schools are accomplishing an incorrect goal, not that schools are failing us or killing anything. Teachers want to help each student, society is placing constraints on what a school can and cannot each because of what a student needs to be able to accomplish once they leave school. This system....it's akin to if the para-Olympic games didn't categorize the disabilities and told an amputee to swim the same race as a blind man. People are different, so the ways in which they do things should be allowed to be different as well, and this needs to being to extend into schools and classrooms to a further extent.
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3 comments
I think it's really difficult to say. Every so often I had a fantastic teacher that knew how to facilitate creativity and I feel like that's when I not only grew the most but had more confidence my own capabilities.
3 years ago·Reply
I agree with @danidee You can have one amazing teacher that inspires you to reach for new levels, while there are others that are just punching a card. I hope that most students find that source of inspiration in school!
3 years ago·Reply
@danidee @galinda There are definitely students who do find that inspiration--and students who don't. I don't believe that totally moving past schools is the answer, but helping schools to be more beneficial to those with other interests beyond traditional topics of study.
3 years ago·Reply