2 years ago
yakwithalan
in English · 3,322 Views
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Sight Fishing from a Kayak
www.youtube.com1DAA50E1-0355-420D-A1AD-2C244287F3DCCreated with sketchtool.
-Sight fishing is one of the many thrills that kayak fishing allows. Sneaking up on a fish in skinny water, watching it swim and throwing a cast in its path is a skill and an addiction. - Sight fishing is traditionally done from a raised platform. - The low position of a kayak makes it difficult to see below the surface. However, the low perspective that takes away from underwater visibility exaggerates other visible cues to the presence of fish. - The angle of your vision into the water is greatly improved with a higher sight angle. Along with sight fishing, you may want to stand to get a better view of where you want to head. - “Nervous water” appears much more obvious when sitting low. It can be caused by a single fish or a large school. Sometimes fins and tails become visible over deep water as schools of fish often travel and sometimes even appear to sleep or rest at the surface. - Tails are more commonly spotted in shallow water, where “tailing” behavior occurs where various species of fish feed on the bottom in water so shallow that their tails stick out of the water. - Some anglers want the advantages of fishing from a kayak, but refuse to give up their traditional sight fishing methods where they stand to spot fish. Standing in a kayak is not a mainstream skill. Only the most stable kayaks will allow it. - You really need to have a good, wide kayak to be able to balance properly. The video attached is focused on sight fishing for redfish, which is quite popular with kayak fisherman.
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5 comments
So it is hard to see from a kayak? I always wondered But if balancing is so hard is it really worth it? @yakwithalan
@mcgraffy It's not that it's incredibly hard, it's just harder than people expect it to be which is why a lot of people fall in a few times before they get the hang of it. @dougjohnson I haven't but if I'm not mistaken you stand on a pontoon, so you're getting the line of sight you'd normally get from a kayak if you know how to stand in it