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Moroccan Lentil Soup recipe – 176 calories

This is one of my favorite vegetable soups ever. It is a healthy, protein-rich, delicious and colorful soup that will warm you up on a cold day. The freshly toasted and ground spices really make a difference here. Ingredients: 1 cup (about 6 oz) lentils 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 6 cups cold water 2 cups diced yellow onions salt cayenne pepper 1/2 cup diced celery 1/2 cup diced carrots 1/2 cup diced bell peppers 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1?8 teaspoon turmeric 1 cup diced tomatoes with juice 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro Preparation: 1. Rinse the lentils and place them in a soup pot with the cold water. 2. Bring to a boil, then reduce thr heat and simmer, uncovered, for about 20 minutes (until tender). 3. While the lentils are cooking, heat the olive oil in a medium sized pan and add the onion, 1/2 tsp salt, and a few pinches of cayenne pepper. 4. Cook over medium heat for about 7-8 minutes (until the onions are soft), then add the diced vegetables, spices and another 1/2 tsp of salt. 5. Cook for about 5 minutes, then stir in the ginger and garlic and cook for another minute. 6. Add the tomatoes and vegetables to the lentils and their broth. Cover and cook for about 30 minutes. 7. Season to taste with salt and cayenne pepper. 8. Garnish with the chopped cilantro and serve. Servings: 6,credits to dietrecipesblog.
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I love lentil soups - do you have the rest of the nutritional information for the soup? (fat, protein) thanks!
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The Most Authentic Hummus Recipe You Will Ever Find (Vegan)
Growing up in a Palestinian-American family, hummus was such a staple. My mother used to make sure plenty of tahini and chickpeas were readily available in the kitchen for when it was time to whip up a fresh batch for visiting family and friends. I ate hummus while I watched Saturday morning cartoons. I ate hummus at birthday parties, graduation parties, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter Sunday. I ate hummus in sandwiches or as a dip with carrot sticks and cucumbers. It was even a great alternative for onion dip when I needed something to dip my pretzels in. I recently 're-stumbled' across a book one of my cousins typed up from scribbled down Palestinian-style recipes passed around in my family for several generations. I figured there were probably tons of fellow hummus lovers on Vingle, so I've decided this would be a good opportunity to share the family recipe with others! --------------------------------------------------------- Chick Pea Dip (Hummus bi Tahineh) 1 lb. can of chick peas 1/3 cup tahineh Juice of 1 or 2 lemons 1 clove garlic Salt to taste 3 tbsp. olive oil A pinch of sumac (Note: Sumac is a dark-colored spice used in a lot of Arabic cooking. It's optional in this recipe, but if you're wanting to find some for yourself, I'd suggest looking in the ethnic ingredients section of your supermarket.) Boil chick peas in juice for 5 minutes on medium heat. Drain. Place chick peas, Tahineh, lemon juice, garlic, and salt in blender. Blend for 15 seconds to make an almost smooth, thick paste. Place Hummus in a plate and garnish with parsley, radishes, red pepper, and pickles. Cover dish with olive oil and sprinkle sumac. Or brown 3 tbsp. pine nuts in 2 tbsp. butter, and pour over Hummus instead of olive oil. --------------------------------------------------------- You can customize the garnish to your own personal tastes. I usually like to use olive oil, sumac, fresh chopped mint, whole chickpeas, and/or whole kalamata olives. The recipe is really easy and really inexpensive to make. (I'd suggest trying some in a fresh falafel sandwich!)
BCAAS: The Building Blocks of Muscle.
As we all know from basic biology, Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. Muscles size cannot grow without them. Vitaminhaat® L-Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid and is a precursor for the production of Nitric Oxide. L-Arginine has been shown to promote increased nitric oxide which supports muscle development and recovery. amino acid build muscles. Branched-chain amino acids, or BCAAs, are a special group of amino acids. They are some of the most proven athletic supplements one can take for direct assimilation. The benefits of BCAAs includes less muscle fatigue, higher levels of other free amino acids, faster recovery and better protein absorption. Not getting enough of them can lead to muscle loss. Let’s take a closer look at how these supplements work and why you should include BCAA supplementation in your workout stack regimen. If your goal is to lose fat and transform your body, Vitaminhaat L-Carnitine would be a great addition to your weight loss supplement stack. Amino Acids Proteins are synthesized from long strings of molecules called amino acids. Amino acids have many functions in our Body: Build new cells and repair tissues Create energy Take part in the enzyme and hormone system Build RNA and DNA the building blocks of life Synthesize antibodies to fight against infections Carry oxygen throughout the body Amino acids are needed to build muscle, red blood cells, and hundreds of other molecules. The human body can produce all except 9 of them, which you have to get through your diet or supplementation. You can get them from eating protein or taking amino acid supplements. The group of 9 amino acids the body can't produce are called essential amino acids. These include isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, histidine, and valine. Non-Essential Amino Acids Alanine Arginine Asparagine Aspartic Acid Cysteine Glutamic Acid Glutamine Glycine Ornithine Proline Serine Tyrosine Essential Amino Acids Histidine Isoleucine Leucine Lysine Methionine Phenylalanine Threonine Tryptophan Valine Branched-Chain Amino Acids The branched-chain amino acids are a group of three essential amino acids: Leucine Isoleucine Valine The branched-chain group is different from other essential amino acids in that they are mostly metabolized in skeletal muscle instead of the liver. References Layman, D. K. (2003). The role of leucine in weight loss diets and glucose homeostasis. The Journal of Nutrition, 133(1), 261S-267S. Holeček, M. (2002). Relation between glutamine, branched-chain amino acids, and protein metabolism. Nutrition, 18(2), 130-133. Houston, M. E. (2001). >Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science. Human kinetics. van Acker, B. A., von Meyenfeldt, M. F., van der Hulst, R. R., Hulsewé, K. W., Wagenmakers, A. J., Deutz, N. E., ... &Soeters, P. B. (1999). Glutamine: the pivot of our nitrogen economy?Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 23(5_suppl), S45-S48. Häussinger, D., Gerok, W., Roth, E., & Lang, F. (1993). Cellular hydration state: an important determinant of protein catabolism in health and disease. The Lancet, 341(8856), 1330-1332. Häussinger, D. (1996). The role of cellular hydration in the regulation of cell function. Biochemical Journal, 313(Pt 3), 697. MacLean, D. A., Graham, T. E., &Saltin, B. (1994). Branched-chain amino acids augment ammonia metabolism while attenuating protein breakdown during exercise. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 267(6), E1010-E1022. Blomstrand, E., Hassmén, P., Ek, S., Ekblom, B., &Newsholme, E. A. (1997). Influence of ingesting a solution of branched‐chain amino acids on perceived exertion during exercise. ActaPhysiologica, 159(1), 41-49. Meijer, A. J., &Dubbelhuis, P. F. (2004). Amino acid signalling and the integration of metabolism. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 313(2), 397-403. Goldberg, A. L., & Chang, T. W. (1978, July). Regulation and significance of amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle. In Federation Proceedings (Vol. 37, No. 9, pp. 2301-2307). Goto, M., Miyahara, I., Hayashi, H., Kagamiyama, H., &Hirotsu, K. (2003). Crystal structures of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase complexed with glutamate and glutarate: true reaction intermediate and double substrate recognition of the enzyme. Biochemistry, 42(13), 3725-3733. Riazi, R., Wykes, L. J., Ball, R. O., &Pencharz, P. B. (2003). The Total Branched-Chain Amino Acid Requirement in Young Healthy Adult Men Determined by Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation by Use of l-[1-13C] Phenylalanine1. The Journal of Nutrition, 133(5), 1383-1389. Sapir, D. G., & Walser, M. (1977). Nitrogen sparing induced early in starvation by infusion of branched-chain ketoacids. Metabolism-Clinical and Experimental, 26(3), 301-308. Stepnick Gropper, S., &Plyler Johnson, A. (1994). Metabolic Effects of Ingestion of L-Amino Acids and Whole Protein. Journal of Nutritional Medicine, 4(3), 311-319. Mero, A. (1999). Leucine supplementation and intensive training. Sports Medicine, 27(6), 347-358. Mero, A., Pitkänen, H., Oja, S. S., Komi, P. V., Pöntinen, P., &Takala, T. (1997). Leucine supplementation and serum amino acids, testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone in male power athletes during training. The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 37(2), 137-145. Shimomura, Y., Murakami, T., Nakai, N., Nagasaki, M., & Harris, R. A. (2004). Exercise promotes BCAA catabolism: effects of BCAA supplementation on skeletal muscle during exercise. The Journal of Nutrition, 134(6), 1583S-1587S.
How Dairy gives You Acne
Everyone who's fighting acne, doubts this at some point in time. 'Does dairy make my acne worse?'. You may stop having dairy for a week, only to realize that it is too much trouble and you can't really tell the difference. Let's figure this out together... Research tells us that inflammatory skin problems such as psoriasis, eczema and acne are more common and more severe in those who consume a diet rich in dairy products. These skin problems are even more common in those who indulge in smoking, consume packaged food and are exposed to polluted air. Cow's milk, which is the largest consumed animal milk in the world, contains casein protein and whey protein. Both these are known to raise the levels of growth hormones in calves as well as humans. Growth hormones such as insulin-like growth factor - 1 or IGF-1 is strongly linked with increased sebum formation in our skin. After infancy our body increasingly loses its ability to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk. We know that more than 50% of the world's population is lactose intolerant. Milk and milk products trigger all sorts of allergies as well as acne. Besides this, cows and buffaloes are regularly injected with artificial hormones to increase their milk supply. When you consume dairy that is mass produced with such practices, it throws your hormones off balance. Dairy may also promote growth of unhealthy gut bacteria and cause gut inflammation. This alters the way your food is digested and absorbed, which in turn leads to vitamin deficiencies and dull skin. How to prevent dairy related skin problems? Reduce dairy intake and switch to high-fiber diet instead. Increase your intake of omega-3 rich food and supplements to achieve a blemish-free skin. Do not substitute dairy with packaged almond milk or soy milk. Consider switching to green tea or freshly brewed black coffee instead. Both of these have plenty of antioxidant benefits which boost your immunity and make your skin glow. If you plan to give a dairy-free lifestyle a try, avoid all dairy products completely for atleast 3 weeks to see the improvement. Any thing less than 2 weeks cannot give you an idea of whether dairy truly aggravates your acne. If your acne persists consider discussing diagnostic tests and acne treatment options with your dermatologist. *Dairy products include milk, yogurt, curd, buttermilk, cheese, paneer, whey protein shakes, cakes and other similar desserts.
Why Do I Have Acne?
Acne is a skin condition that affects the oil glands and hair follicles. The pores in your skin are linked to glands that produce an oily substance called sebum. The glands and your pores are linked by a canal called the follicle, which contains thin hair that grows to the skin's surface. When sebum and dead skin cells combine, they form a plug in the follicle. The bacteria in the plug causes inflammation, which results in red inflamed acne and furthermore, acne scars What is the underlying cause of acne? Despite the fact that the exact cause of acne has yet to be determined. However, there are some things that can cause or worsen acne, such as: 1. Hormonal changes such as puberty, menstruation, and pregnancy can all cause acne. 2. Squeezing or picking at existing pimples 3. Excessive cleaning or scrubbing of the skin 4. Weather with high humidity 5. When you use excessive amounts of cosmetics or experiment with them, as well as harmful hair products and oil-based products such as sunscreen. 6. Corticosteroids and anabolic steroids for body building. 7. Acne on the forehead is linked to dandruff in the hair. What are the signs and symptoms of acne? Everyone is unique, and so are their symptoms. As a result, different symptoms indicate different types of acne. As an example: 1. If you have blackheads, they are open, clogged pores on the surface of your skin. 2. If you have whiteheads, they are plugged pores close to the skin's surface. 3. If you have papules, these are small, tender red/pink bumps on your skin. 4. Pustules are papules with pus on top if you have them. 5. If you have nodules, which are large, painful lumps deep beneath the skin's surface, 6. If you have cysts, they can be painful, pus-filled lumps located beneath the skin's surface. Acne is one of the most common skin conditions that can affect anyone, regardless of age. It is unquestionably a difficult condition to prevent and even more difficult to treat. Certain natural remedies, such as stress control and weight loss help tremendously. If you are suffering from acne do consider discussing it with your dermatologist. Medical science has advanced a lot in treating even the most severe forms of acne such as cystic acne and hormonal acne. You no longer need to suffer alone.
Walnut Baklawah Rolls (Arabic Baklava)
Baklawah is one of those Middle Eastern recipes that is truly a labor of love. It takes a couple hours to prepare, so it is often reserved for special occasions. Baklawah is best paired with some Arabic style coffee with just the right amount of cardamom. Impress your friends by bringing freshly baked Baklawah rolls to your next get-together! ------------------------------------------------------- Baklawah Sticks To Make Attar (Syrup): 2 cups sugar 1 cup water 1 tbsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. orange blossom water (Mazaher), optional 1. Mix sugar and water and bring to boil. 2. Add lemon juice and boil for 7 more minutes. 3. When cool, add orange blossom water (optional). Makes 2 cups of Attar. To Make Baklawah: 1 lb. Filo Dough 3 cups walnuts, chopped 1/3 cup confectioner's sugar 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1 cup rendered (clarified) butter 1 1/2 cups Attar 1. Mix nuts, sugar, and spices. 2. Cut rolled Filo Dough int 3 parts. 3. Place 3 sheets lengthwise on the table and brush butter between layers. Place 2 tbsp. nut mixture on the narrow side of sheets, folding 1/2" from each side and roll. 4. Repeat the process with the rest of the dough, placing the sticks in a greased pan. 5. Brush with butter. Bake from 1 1/2 to 2 hours or until golden brown, in an oven preheated to 275 degrees. 6. Cool for ten minutes and pour Attar. ------------------------------------------------------- Cheese Variation: Use 1 1/2 lbs. of Syrian sweet cheese or Ricotta in place of nuts and spices. Follow the same procedure, and pinch rolls with a fork before baking. If desired, add 1 tsp. of orange blossom water and 2 tbsp. of sugar to cheese.
Easy Lifestyle Changes for Amazing Skin
Your lifestyle choices can lead to hormonal imbalances. Lack of exercise and eating packaged food can cause PCOD or Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome. As a result, you may experience acne and hairloss. Here are some easy lifestyle changes to restore healthy hormone levels. Get Sufficient Sleep Lack of sleep can lead to unhealthy habits. Enough sleep helps to balance ghrelin and leptin – hormones associated with appetite. Ghrelin stimulates your appetite and encourages you to eat more while leptin regulates it. Insufficient sleep increases ghrelin and lowers leptin in your bloodstream. As a result, you tend to eat more than you need. Make sure that you get adequate sleep to avoid gaining weight. Sleep also helps to rejuvenate your skin and body. Don't Stay in One Place When you remain stagnant for a long time, your body experiences hormonal imbalances. That’s why you feel pain in certain organs. To restore balance, make sure that you commit at least 30 minutes every day to exercise. It doesn’t have to be something rigorous. A walk around the neighborhood can do the trick. The goal is to be active and get your blood pumping. The breathing also helps to balance your hormones and breaking a sweat can clear your pores. Remain Calm When you try to do so many things at the same time, it becomes stressful. You can’t stop thinking about all the possibilities – mostly bad ones. Unfortunately, stress causes a lot of hormonal imbalance and hair loss comes with it. You should also avoid a lot of coffee because caffeine can also increase your stress levels. Take a deep breath and relax. Do your things in an orderly manner, and you won’t have to worry about the results. Watch What you Eat There is a direct correlation between your diet and hormones. Insulin and glucagon are hormones produced by the pancreas. Your body produces insulin after you eat. It helps to convert the food into energy. On the other hand, your body produces glucagon when it has gone without food for a while. This hormone helps to convert the stored glycogen into energy. Eating sugary foods causes an insulin imbalance. Your body won’t produce enough insulin to convert the food into energy. That’s why you feel more exhausted after eating unhealthy foods. This also triggers insulin resistance and pigmentation. You should eat foods rich in omega-3 and probiotics. Lean proteins are also good for hormonal balance. Your habits can affect the hormonal balance in your body. Practice the above healthy habits to keep your energy levels and moods up. And do consult your dermatologist if your problems persist.
How is EMS Training Beneficial for your Physical Therapy?
Although Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) is a relatively new technology in the fitness world, the benefits associated with the technology are increasingly becoming popular. The benefits of EMS training include but are not limited to strengthening muscles, weight loss, pain reduction, and increased flexibility. These benefits are particularly important for physical therapy. Physical therapy encompasses providing services in situations where movement and function are threatened by aging or an injury. These services are designed to restore movement. EMS technology has its roots in physical therapy. Indeed, a version of EMS, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, commonly abbreviated as TENS, has been used in physical therapy for decades. Even though EMS is used exclusively for workouts in the fitness industry, the technology maintains some of the benefits of TENS and, as such good solution for individuals who need physical therapy. Why is EMS Training Beneficial for your Physical Therapy? Many individuals are in physical therapy to build strength, correct posture, increase flexibility, increase range of motion and functionality and manage and reduce pain. The core function of EMS training is to strengthen muscles, the key factor to many of the reasons people go to physical therapy. The role of best EMS suit in effectively and efficiently strengthening muscles is the main reason EMS is beneficial to your physical therapy. The electrical impulses enable the muscles to contract as such facilitating muscle development and subsequently strengthening. When can you Use EMS in Therapy? Muscular Atrophy You can use EMS for your physical therapy when you have muscular atrophy. Muscular atrophy describes a condition where muscles waste away due to aging or disuse. Neurogenic muscle atrophy occurs when an injury harms the nerve attaching to the muscles. Whether the condition is due to osteoarthritis, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, or an injury, it is necessary to rebuild the muscles to avoid long-term loss of movement. EMS training suits effectively rebuilds muscles since it forces muscles to contract, resulting in muscle growth and strengthening. The efficiency of EMS implies a weak individual can quickly rebuild their muscles compared to the time it would take in conventional training. For the same reason, EMS is the perfect solution for people with low endurance. Pain Management EMS training strengthens all major muscles in the body by providing more muscle contractions than conventional training and, as such vital in pain management, particularly lower back pain or knee pain. Lower back pain is often a result of poor core strength associated with improper posture and incorrect muscle balance. EMS training strengthens core muscles without exerting too much pressure and, as such, reduces lower back pain. Which Type of Exercises Should You Do? It is important to recognize the role of EMS in physical therapy largely depends on the type of injury and your physical capabilities. The exercises appropriate for your physical therapy must be tailored to address the issue. Ultimately, depending on your injury, you can easily determine which muscles to strengthen and subsequently customize your workout sessions to focus on those particular muscles. If you have any underlying medical condition, it is necessary to consult a doctor prior to starting your EMS training. For more visit our eBay store.
Keeping your heart healthy is something you can work on every day
Key takeaways A heart healthy diet is a pattern of food you eat over days, weeks and months.  Regular physical activity reduces your risk of having a heart attack or developing heart disease.  Quitting smoking decreases your risk of heart attack and stroke almost straight away.  Understanding and controlling cholesterol and blood pressure is key to your heart health.  Keeping your heart healthy is something you can work on every day. What you eat, how much you move, whether you smoke and controlling your cholesterol and blood pressure are five things that can have a big impact on your heart. Find out why they’re so important and get practical tips on living a heart healthy lifestyle.  Tips for eating a heart healthy diet  Healthy eating for a healthy heart is a pattern. It doesn’t focus on one type of food or nutrient, but rather on what you eat over days, weeks and months.  This style of eating is naturally low in saturated and trans fats, salt and added sugar. It’s rich in wholegrains, fibre, antioxidants and unsaturated fats.  Eat more fruit and vegetables  A diet full of a variety of fruit and vegetables is linked to healthier hearts and a lower risk of heart disease.  Swap to wholegrain  Wholegrain cereals include more of the natural grain. This means they have more nutrients like dietary fibre, B vitamins, vitamin E, and healthy fats.  Make healthy fat choices  The best fats to include in your diet are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated (omega-3 and omega-6) fats. You can find these healthier fats in avocados, nuts, fish and sunflower seeds.  Use herbs and spices instead of salt  Eating too much salt is bad for your heart. The sodium in salt can increase your risk of developing high blood pressure, a major risk factor for heart disease.  Find out more about scacuncristina kesihatan Tips for being more active  Doing regular physical activity reduces your risk of having a heart attack or developing heart disease. Keeping active helps to control common heart disease risk factors, including:  High blood pressure,  arbainanurdin tips petua cara High cholesterol, and  Being overweight.   Regular physical activity can also help strengthen your bones and muscles. It can help you feel more energetic, happier and relaxed.  Source: # https://amara.org/en/profiles/profile/lNII8WrsCvn4hpRMYGezaIzhB_gudNnOfvKHWn9bksY/ # https://amara.org/en/profiles/profile/mfPuF7-Jk082gD5BnVG5MatpqxEiQtXVbbnnjIC2s3Q/ # https://amara.org/en/profiles/profile/RT5vNfDdpUOgvwSRMrvTFZFbNTQvhQheWX2hdoCe5TU/
How To Build An Authentic Falafel Sandwich (Vegan)
Visiting the Getty Museum is probably my most favorite reasons to drive out to Los Angeles with my friends. It's like Disneyland for art nerds, where every large building houses an immeasurable amount of visual history and work by many of the famed masters. However, all Rembrandts aside, the Getty Museum is also really close to a Zankou Chicken, a Lebanese 'fast food' restaurant that serves up bang-for-your-buck hot shwarma and falafel sandwiches. It's become a tradition of mine to stop off at Zankou after a full day of art-viewing to get tasty sandwich with my friends. So good! One of the things that makes Zankou my favorite is how they build their sandwiches - much more traditionally than most other places that serve falafel. (And while things like the 'falafel burger' might be fun every once in a while, sometimes you just want to eat something that tastes like your Mom made it, you know?) So, inspired by Zankou Chicken's falafel sandwichy goodness, I've decided I wanted to give you all a recipe showing how to make some delicious (and not dry!) traditional falafel sandwiches. Try it the next time you want to get a little more 'international' with your lunch! ------------------------------------------------------------------ Falafel Sandwiches (serves 4) 4 cups chickpeas, dried 2 large onions 1 whole head of garlic 2 bunches parsley Hot banana peppers to suit your taste Pickled turnips to suit your taste 1/2 a medium-sized cucumber, sliced 1/2 a tomato, sliced 2 tsp. cumin powder Salt and pepper to taste 1 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. baking soda 2 - 3 loaves of pita bread 1 cup tahini paste 1/4 cup lemon juice 1/2 - 3/4 cup water, as needed 1/2 - 3/4 tsp. salt To Make Tahini Sauce: 1. Combine tahini, lemon juice, and two cloves of minced garlic in a bowl and stir to combine. 2. Add the water a little at a time as needed to form a smooth, creamy sauce approximately the thickness of heavy cream. 3. Season to taste with salt and more lemon juice, if necessary. To Make Falafel: 1. Soak the chickpeas overnight. Drain. 2. Combine beans, onions, garlic, parsley, and hot pepper in a food processor. Add salt, pepper, cumin, and baking powder. Mix thoroughly. 3. When ready to fry the Falafel, add baking soda. Shape into patties in 1 1/2" in diameter and 1/2" thick. (Small 'meatball' sizes are okay too!) Fry in deep hot oil until light brown and crisp. 4. Serve hot with tomato slices, cucumber slices, banana peppers, onion slices, and/or pickled turnip in pita bread in the form of a sandwich. Add the tahini sauce. ------------------------------------------------------------------ If you don't have four people to share this with, no worries! The falafel batter can be easily frozen and stored for the next time you want to make yourself a falafel sandwich. Just remember to thaw and add the baking soda just before frying.
Acne - What to Eat, What Not to Eat
No matter how much we prevent it, acne can still find its way to form on - or under, or even both - our skin. In most cases the acne is mild and will go away on its own (or quicker if you take some form of acne medication) but it’s also common to see acne breakouts happening so frequently despite a number of medications used - a condition that we know as acne-prone skin. Here’s what you need to know about this skin issue and why it can happen to all of us. Diet for acne-prone skin; what the skin needs? We used to read that acne-prone skin happens mostly among oily skin types and while that can be true, the latest studies and discoveries indicate that acne-prone skin can happen to all of us regardless of skin type. Yes, even dry or sensitive skin type can suffer from an acne problem! This is due to the fact that acne can form due to a number of factors. And in most cases, several factors together cause acne breakouts and not just one single factor. But rest assured, there are several types of acne treatment available to make your skin belmish-free. Since this is a multi-factoral skin issue, dermatologists usually need to prescribe multiple medications and treatments - but the main focus will be on your dietary habits and leading a healthy lifestyle. How does diet affect our skin? The diet plays a big role when it comes to the overall health of our skin. After all, what we eat shows on our skin. For the acne-prone skin, there are some foods that you need to avoid, replacing them with foods that you need to eat instead. Multiple studies have shown that certain food groups cause acne. Refined sugar, also known as high-glycemic carbohydrates, is very inflammatory for acne-prone skin. Carbs and sugar trigger a spike in insulin which is a type of hormone. Excess of this hormone causes the oil glands within the skin to produce more oil and in turn, increases the chance of you getting acne. Other food groups such as dairy and trans-fat are also found to cause acne on our skin but high-glycemic carbohydrates cause the most damage. Since we know these food groups cause acne, replacing them with foods that are known to minimize the chances of your skin developing acne - and the chance of them coming back in the future - is the right way to go. What foods are believed to help your skin? The opposite of high-glycemic carbohydrates is the low-glycemic sources that we know as complex carbohydrates. These are beneficial for the skin. Such foods are high in vitamins A, E, and B vitamins as well as minerals that are beneficial in reducing inflammation. Besides this, they also speed up the skin healing process, and strengthen the skin barrier. This helps your skin to be more resilient and able to heal the acne or even prevent any acne from happening. Examples of foods that are in the complex carbs category include whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies, and legumes. Other food groups that you can add to your diet are protein sources from poultry and fish. Besides this, fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel are good anti-inflammatory foods and beneficial to heal inflamed skin. There’s no specific rule for this diet. Just trying to include them as the major part of your diet is the key to ensure your skin gets enough healthy nutrients to eliminate potential factors that can cause you acne.
How to Make Apricot Fruit Leather Roll-Ups (Vegan)
Apricot fruit leather - called 'lavashak' throughout the Middle East - is a favorite snack of children of the region similar to the appeal of Fruit Roll-Ups here in the United States. They're chewy, sweet, and made with virtually 100% fruit, making them a much healthier alternative to most other snacks out there. Growing up, my mother used to buy lavashak in huge packages at the Arabic market. But this was far before Internet recipes, the trend of dehydrating fruit, and the 21st century DIY ambition. (I'm dating myself a little, but I digress.) Basically, what I'm trying to say is making your own lavashak at home is so easy and probably much easier than my family had realized. And not only does this recipe work great with the traditional choice of apricots, but pretty much all stone fruits, including peaches, cherries, and plums! ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Apricot Fruit Leather (Lavashak) 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 cups pitted and diced fresh apricots 1/2 cup sugar (or to taste, depending on the sweetness of the apricots) 1. Preheat the oven to 150 degrees F (165 degrees C), or the lowest setting you have. 2. Combine the lemon juice, apricots and sugar in a saucepan. Cook over medium heat until sugar has dissolved. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. 3. Cover an 11x17 inch pan or cookie sheet with a layer of plastic wrap. Pour the pureed fruit onto the plastic and spread evenly to within 1 inch of the edge. 4. Bake for 4 to 6 hours in the preheated oven, using a spoon or a pair of tongs to keep the door slightly ajar, or until the puree has dried and is no longer sticky. Once dry, you can cut it into strips and store in an airtight container.
A Baba Ghannouj Recipe That Isn't Baba Ghannasty (Vegan)
Baba Ghannouj (also spelled 'gannoush' or 'ghanouj') is a tahini-based dip similar to hummus, swapping out creamy chickpeas for the smoky flavor of roasted eggplant. I'm a bit of a baba ghannouj snob, as ratio is really important in a dip like this. Too much tahini makes the consistency runny, while too much eggplant gives it a really seedy texture. ('Baba ghannasty' is actually what I used to call really seedy baba ghannouj growing up. No kid likes a lot of mushy eggplant!) Here is a traditional recipe for baba ghannouj. Pair it with some lightly toasted loaves of pita bread or sliced veggies for a healthy snack that's full of flavor! --------------------------------------------------------- Eggplant Dip (Baba Ghannouj) 1 large eggplant 1/2 cup tahineh 2 tbsp. olive oil 1 clove of garlic, minced Juice of 1 lemon Salt to taste Cut 1" slits in eggplant to prevent from splattering while baking. Bake eggplant at 500 degrees until tender (or boil in water 10 to 15 minutes). Split eggplant open and scoop the inside pulp together with the juice. Mix Tahineh, lemon juice, garlic, and salt to make Tahineh sauce. Add water, in needed, to make a thick sauce. Add mashed eggplant to Tahineh sauce. Place in salad bowl and pour oil on top. Garnish with parsley and tomato slices, if desired. --------------------------------------------------------- I hope you all enjoy making this at home! Try creating your own variations, or swapping out the eggplant with zucchini or acorn squash for a whole new flavor!