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Moroccan Lentil Soup recipe – 176 calories

This is one of my favorite vegetable soups ever. It is a healthy, protein-rich, delicious and colorful soup that will warm you up on a cold day. The freshly toasted and ground spices really make a difference here. Ingredients: 1 cup (about 6 oz) lentils 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 6 cups cold water 2 cups diced yellow onions salt cayenne pepper 1/2 cup diced celery 1/2 cup diced carrots 1/2 cup diced bell peppers 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1?8 teaspoon turmeric 1 cup diced tomatoes with juice 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro Preparation: 1. Rinse the lentils and place them in a soup pot with the cold water. 2. Bring to a boil, then reduce thr heat and simmer, uncovered, for about 20 minutes (until tender). 3. While the lentils are cooking, heat the olive oil in a medium sized pan and add the onion, 1/2 tsp salt, and a few pinches of cayenne pepper. 4. Cook over medium heat for about 7-8 minutes (until the onions are soft), then add the diced vegetables, spices and another 1/2 tsp of salt. 5. Cook for about 5 minutes, then stir in the ginger and garlic and cook for another minute. 6. Add the tomatoes and vegetables to the lentils and their broth. Cover and cook for about 30 minutes. 7. Season to taste with salt and cayenne pepper. 8. Garnish with the chopped cilantro and serve. Servings: 6,credits to dietrecipesblog.
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I love lentil soups - do you have the rest of the nutritional information for the soup? (fat, protein) thanks!
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