TeamWaffles
3 years ago1,000+ Views
Facebook Tells DEA: Stop Impersonating Users
Facebook sent a letter to U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) demanding DEA agents stop impersonating users on Facebook. This letter comes in the wake of a report that revealed the DEA seized a woman's phone and later created a Facebook account in her name after she was arrested and plead guilty to a cocaine distribution charge. The woman, Sondra Arquiett, was not aware that the DEA created this account and spoke with he friends through this account. The administration even posted photos of Arquiett with her son and another photo of her alone in underwear and a bra. Arquiett has sued the DEA agent who initially set up the account, however, the Justice Department is claiming the agent has a right to do such a thing. Thankfully Arquiett has Facebook on her side. "The DEA's deceptive actions... threaten the integrity of our community," Facebook chief security officer Joe Sullivan wrote to DEA head Michele Leonhart. "Using Facebook to impersonate others abuses that trust and makes people feel less safe and secure when using our service." During the legal process, a federal prosecutor claimed Arquiett "implicitly consented by granting access to the information stored in her cell phone and by consenting to the use of that information to aid in an ongoing criminal investigations [sic]." Facebook stated that it is "deeply troubled" by the legal position the justice department is taking on this matter. Runa Sandvik, a privacy researcher and advisor for the Freedom of the Press Foundations explains it well: "It's one thing to strike a deal and become an informant. It's another to lose complete control of your online identity."
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Wow, I can't believe they are blatantly doing this, admitting to it, and they just don't care. This is entirely inappropriate, especially the pictures they posted of her.
3 years ago·Reply
Oh my gosh I can hardly believe this, it's like something Orwellian! That's horrible that for our justice system to be abusing this women's personal information and misleading her friends and contacts! I'm not a big fan of Facebook, but I'm certainly glad they're on the right side of this one, this is clearly morally wrong even if it's somehow technically legal.
3 years ago·Reply
Definitely not cool to steal identies but if they want to make fake accounts I think thats an excellent way of catching drug dealers.
3 years ago·Reply
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