dvdeus
1,000+ Views

How Old Is Too Old to Start a Business?

How Old Is Too Old to Start a Business? The Answer May Surprise You. (Infographic) http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/238924
dvdeus
12 Likes
4 Shares
{count, plural, =0 {Comment} one {Comment} other {{count} Comments}}
Suggested
Recent
This is encouraging. I think a lot of people feel pressure to be successful as soon as possible.
Cards you may also be interested in
The Ultimate Guide to Resume Writing - Part 2/6 - The Audience
So by now hopefully we've realized why putting effort into writing a resume is important, it helps you stand out when your face isn't there to do the talking for you. I've pulled a couple statistics out of the link above, and I'd like to share those. On average, for every 200 resumes read, one (1), interview will be granted. This gives your resume about 10-20 seconds to make an impression on whomever is reading it. Let's talk about the components that go into making that impression. When writing a resume, you have to know your target audience. Is your target a large, well-established corporation? Chances are you'll be writing a more formal resume. A brand new start-up focused on sending the word "Yo" to anyone with the app (actually exists....)? Changes are your resume will be much more conversationally written. Knowing your audience enables you to tailor both what you list on your resume and how you list it. What values and skills does the target company need? What experiences do you have that will address those? These are two of the main questions to be asking yourself when writing (which we will get to in part 3). I like to ask myself another question here. What superficially unrelated experiences have I had that I can link to the target company/position. For example, when I was applying for positions at a company that works in an international market, detailing my experiences with adapting to foreign environments and customs helped get me interviews and a position there for next summer. Even though these were not always jobs (just travel in many cases), it showcased an adaptability that the company did not know it wanted, and as such made a great impression! Talking about yourself when writing a resume can be an awkward experience, to say the least. It is hard to draw a line between advertising yourself and bragging or being arrogant. Day to day, we don't have to advertise ourselves (generalizations I know), and as such tend to be more modest about accomplishments and skills. A resume is not the place to downplay your achievements. Make assertions about what you have done, and make sure these assertions are based in facts. Don't exaggerate to the point where a past employer would say that your description is inconsistent with the work you did in that position. You want to make sure that you accurately and glowingly describe yourself to whomever reads your resume. To pull another quote from the article I linked, "People more often buy the best advertised product than the best product." You need to show how your combination of skills and mindset (or whatever characteristics you are focusing on) put you at an advantage. You may not have a perfect 4.0 in university, but having a broader skillset can easily make up for differences in abilities. Companies aren't hiring robots, they are hiring people to work within teams and those who can progress and learn. Now we come to an interesting subject, summaries. I have seen resumes that have summaries, I personally do not have one. I feel it is more important to keep your resume to a single side of a single page (at least early in a career) than it is to summarize what you are planning to say in person. Granted, this approach is based on my personal situation, as my resumes are given out in person and are accompanied by conversations with a recruiter or such. For applications online, a summary may be more in order, but I've still left my summary to the cover letter (a more personalized note to whomever/whichever company you are applying to). (I'm thinking about doing explanations about cover letters after I finish my sections on resumes). Long story short, a summary is your choice, but don't get bogged down in tedious wording, it will tire the reader and will get your resume tossed (often literally into a bin). Once you've identified who you are speaking to, what you want to communicate to them, and how you want to do just that, you are ready to start writing your resume! Remember as we go forward, resumes are not to be set in stone, let yours be flexible, change it, update it, personalize it to the company you are applying to, trust me, it makes a difference. Next time we will actually begin the process of writing your resume!
97% vs 3%
Society is divided up between two categories. There's the 97% and the 3%. The 97% are the average people. They work 9-5 jobs, focused too much on their education, don't think outside the box, and simply quit on themselves and their goals (if they had any significantly big ones). Yes, some people chose to be a part of that percentile and that's ok because it's their choice. They wanted it to be easy. But for those who complain about it have no right to. They may be thinking "I work 8 hours a day. I deserve better and should be living a better life." In reality they don't. They knew what they were getting themselves into and what the rest of their life would be like. They have made their choice a have given up on what could have been, for them, a life full of rewards and luxury. They decide to see the obvious instead of what's further ahead, and when they see the obvious, they hurt themselves more by looking at it through one perspective. These are the people who have simply said "I will do my part in society no matter the cost." Education plays a huge factor in your destiny. Some dream jobs do require an advanced education. When this is present, education is ok to take part in for it is needed to achieve a dream. For jobs that don't require education, you simply are spending $100,000 to people who will never know your name. The 3% of people in society are the people who put themselves away from society. They're the entrepreneurs in this world, the people loaded with confidence, they ignore what people say, etc. These people realized they have so much potential in their life and they take the opportunity even when it's not present. To be where they are they took the risks and sacrifices and understood what outcomes could come. Every penny they've ever made was put into what they believed in even if it was a dream or goal so big it scared them. Fear is not present in these people. They realized the only thing that could really stop them was fear therefore they learned to overcome it. No matter the criticism they received, negative comments they've been told, or even simply being told "you can't do it." 24 hours was not enough for them to get what they needed done so they would put in a full 24 hours of work. Now, depending on who they are and their stories, they could have had an easy start or challenging one. Some entrepreneurs were lucky enough to have a family member who already started the business or gave a startup of $1,000,000. But some start with nothing but a dollar and a vision. One feels much more rewarding than the other and causes them to have a bigger appreciation for what they have and have done. The 3% are always hungry no matter what they have. They will not stop until they have what they want. There are many quotes for these people but the quote posted best describes them. So now that you know a little about the two sides of society, which one will you choose? Are you happy with where you stand? Or do you want better? It's never too late to change or start. All it takes is confidence, hard work, and a drive strong enough that you constantly think "I can't quit now." Keep pushing towards what you want and stop at nothing. Have a good day guys, Kyler
12
1
4