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How to Make Apricot Fruit Leather Roll-Ups (Vegan)

Apricot fruit leather - called 'lavashak' throughout the Middle East - is a favorite snack of children of the region similar to the appeal of Fruit Roll-Ups here in the United States. They're chewy, sweet, and made with virtually 100% fruit, making them a much healthier alternative to most other snacks out there. Growing up, my mother used to buy lavashak in huge packages at the Arabic market. But this was far before Internet recipes, the trend of dehydrating fruit, and the 21st century DIY ambition. (I'm dating myself a little, but I digress.) Basically, what I'm trying to say is making your own lavashak at home is so easy and probably much easier than my family had realized. And not only does this recipe work great with the traditional choice of apricots, but pretty much all stone fruits, including peaches, cherries, and plums! ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Apricot Fruit Leather (Lavashak) 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 cups pitted and diced fresh apricots 1/2 cup sugar (or to taste, depending on the sweetness of the apricots) 1. Preheat the oven to 150 degrees F (165 degrees C), or the lowest setting you have. 2. Combine the lemon juice, apricots and sugar in a saucepan. Cook over medium heat until sugar has dissolved. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. 3. Cover an 11x17 inch pan or cookie sheet with a layer of plastic wrap. Pour the pureed fruit onto the plastic and spread evenly to within 1 inch of the edge. 4. Bake for 4 to 6 hours in the preheated oven, using a spoon or a pair of tongs to keep the door slightly ajar, or until the puree has dried and is no longer sticky. Once dry, you can cut it into strips and store in an airtight container.
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@kristenadams I'm sending you my magical good luck kitchen vibes right now.
I can totally do this! There is no possible way I can mess this up hahaha
Three ingredients! Woo!
I would just want to eat anything called 'lavashak' haha
This was my childhood favorite
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