2 years ago
greggr
in English · 1,464 Views
likes 9clips 3comments 2
H.P. Lovecraft's Five Tips for Writing Weird Fiction
H.P. Lovecraft is perhaps one of the best known 'horror' writers of all time, and though he considered himself an amateur in many ways, he still produced a substantial amount of work on the topic of writing: how could one produce weird fiction like his? Lovecraft saw this genre as a blend between story telling and fear. He wanted to bring the fear because fear, he believed, is the strongest emotion we can experience, and thus its infusion into a story makes it breathless, unexplainable, and something out-of-this world to enjoy. Five tips from Lovecraft about writing this kind of weird fiction are as follows, but the tips are hardly specific to weird fiction at all, so use them to strengthen any and all types of your writing: 1) Organize a synopsis or scenario of events in their real order of occurrence, regardless of their order of narration. 2) Now, create one in the order of narration: giving details and notes about perspective, stresses, climax and more. 3) Following #2, write the story out: quickly and not too critically! Change plot points (even if it breaks #2) if they seem mean to be changed: its just meant to be a guide for beginning. 4) Revise the entire text, paying attention to vocabulary, syntax, rhythm of prose, proportioning of parts, niceties of tone, grace and transitions, etc... 5) Prepare a neatly typed copy—not hesitating to add final revisory touches where they seem in order. To access nearly all of Lovecraft's work online, check out this awesome post by Open Culture: http://www.openculture.com/2014/10/h-p-lovecrafts-classic-horror-stories-free-online.html Since I encouraged some of our community members to write some spooky fiction, I thought this might be helpful! @WyattHaste @GeorgeJensenJr @DanielRivera
greggr clipped in 1 collections
2 comments
This plan of action totally works for any kind of writing, but I think that a lot of horror fiction doesnt get the first step in there--we miss the part where its supposed to make sense!