patrickballeux
4 years ago1,000+ Views

What would you do for $5?

If you have some skills that you can rely on, maybe its time to sell your services. Fiverr.com is a website where you can advertise your skills for just 5$. The idea is quite simple as it may range from posting some link on your Twitter account, reviewing a text or translating some text into your native language. You basically need to figure out what you want to do for 5$. You won't get rich overnight but it can be a nice way to make some money by promoting yourself over the web. All kinds of services are offered so its up to you to figure out how to be the best. Have you tried Fiverr? Tell us about your experience. I just registered myself and will comment about my own experience in the coming weeks.
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I have looked into the service. I was looking to see if there are people there who could do social media writing. What I found was astounding. There were people who were selling PR articles/works from 5 dollars lol. I wanted to buy it just to see what they would come up with lol @patrickballeux did you try it?
This is great, I'm always up for making some extra cash
I luvvvv Fiverr! A friend of mine turned me on to them a year ago and I wondered how legit it was. Well, I took a chance and ordered a graphic. All I did was scribble a design, snapped a pic with my phone and uploaded it with payment. 36 hours later I got my graphic and it was perfect! I use it as my handle pic on Yelp! @goyo, you should totally try it.
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