Cards you may also be interested in
Chicken Alfredo Baked Ziti
Delicious chicken and ziti tossed with a lighter alfredo sauce and baked up to cheesy perfection. INGREDIENTS: CHICKEN BAKED ZITI INGREDIENTS: 12 ounces ziti (or any pasta shape) 2 cups shredded, cooked chicken (about 2 small chicken breasts) 1 batch alfredo sauce (see below) 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese (I used 2% low fat) (optional toppings: additional shredded Parmesan cheese, chopped fresh parsley) ALFREDO SAUCE INGREDIENTS: 1 Tbsp. olive oil 4 cloves garlic, minced 3 Tbsp. flour 1 cup chicken broth 1 cup low-fat milk (I used 1%) 3/4 cup freshly-grated Parmesan cheese 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. black pepper DIRECTIONS: TO MAKE THE CHICKEN BAKED ZITI: Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.Cook the pasta al dente in a large stockpot of well-salted boiling according to package instructions. Drain. Return pasta to the stockpot and add chicken and alfredo sauce. Gently toss to combine until the pasta is evenly coated. Pour half of the pasta into a greased 11x7-inch or 9x13-inch baking dish. Sprinkle evenly with 1 cup of cheese. Layer the remaining half of the pasta evenly on top. Sprinkle evenly with the remaining 1/2 cup of cheese. Bake for 20-25 minutes until the cheese is melted and just barely starts to turn golden. Remove and serve immediately, sprinkled with additional toppings if desired. TO MAKE THE ALFREDO SAUCE: Heat olive oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add garlic and saute one minute, stirring occasionally, until fragrant. Sprinkle with flour, and stir to combine. Saute for an additional minute to cook the flour, stirring occasionally. Slowly add chicken broth, whisking to combine until smooth. Whisk in milk, and bring the mixture to a simmer. Let cook for an additional minute until thickened, then stir in Parmesan cheese, salt and pepper until the cheese melted. Remove from heat and set aside.
Want to Get Fit? Here Are the Most Expensive and the Cheapest Sources of Protein
Getting fit is a common goal for many people, but achieving it often proves to be quite hard. Although regular exercise, calorie deficits and eating a lot of protein are three of the most important rules to get fit, sticking to a strict diet and exercise regimen can test one's willpower very much. Further, since high-quality gyms can sometimes cost a couple of thousand rupees or more per month, a fitness plan can be fairly expensive. Saving on a gym membership could be straightforward, as one can simply choose to work out at home, outside or switch to budget-friendly facilities, which can cost under Rs. 1,000 per month. Regarding protein consumption, many online articles only highlight foods which have "high levels of protein" irrespective of their cost. So, to help people find the most financially-friendly sources of protein, we analysed the most popular ones in terms of their cost per 100 grams of protein. Meat, Fish, Yogurt and Certain Cheeses Are Expensive As one would expect, certain sources of protein are significantly more expensive than others. As an example, greek yogurt has gotten quite popular recently as a healthy food. In fact, it's a good source of protein, calcium and probiotics. It also helps one feel full for a relatively small amount of calories. But, it's actually a fairly expensive source of protein, costing more than Rs. 500 per 100 grams of protein. For instance, a 90g container of low-fat Epigamia Greek Yogurt costs Rs. 40 on BigBasket. This product contains approximately 7.4 grams of protein, netting an effective cost of Rs. 541 per 100 grams of protein. Above all, we found swiss cheese to be incredibly expensive for the protein one gets out of it. Steak and fish are very expensive too. These tend to be higher in fat and calories, so they may be better to avoid if one is also dieting. Not All Seeds and Grains Are Made Equal Seeds and grains such as almonds or quinoa are often a part of suggested diet food lists. However, such foods tend to vary dramatically in price. We found hemp seeds and almonds cost around Rs. 500 - 700 per 100 grams of protein, while chickpeas and oats cost under Rs. 200 for the same amount of this muscle-building nutrient. If one wants to maximise the amount of protein while minimising cost, pick specific nuts with care and go for something like sunflower seeds rather than almonds. Surprising Winners Most of the winners on this list are pretty obvious: tofu, chicken breast and eggs have commonly been known to be some of the most popular effective protein sources that also help you feel full. So, it's not a surprise that they are some of the cheaper options. One of the items on the winner list was somewhat surprising: peanut butter. It only costs Rs. 167 for 100 grams of protein. However, peanut butter is relatively high in fat and sugar, so it shouldn't be heavily relied on for building lean muscle mass and reducing belly fat. Staying Healthy Physically & Financially If one wants to get into better physical shape, it requires a deliberate commitment to change one's lifestyle, increasing the frequency and intensity of one's workouts while also strictly regimenting one's diet. Just pumping out sets at the gym won't provide the desired results if one isn't following a well-structured exercise routine and using proper form. It's also important to control one's diet properly so that one consumes a wide variety of nutrients. Worrying solely about protein and calories can be counterproductive and cause ailments. Focusing on certain financial aspects related to getting into better physical shape will make the whole process easier on one's bank account. For example, as we have done here, researching the most cost-effective sources of protein can help one efficiently build muscles while also helping one save money. There are several other aspects related to one's health that could potentially result in cost savings, too. For instance, one could use a rewards credit card to pay for gym memberships or groceries, which could offset the total economic cost. Further, it's possible one may be overpaying for health insurance if one simply took the advice of a salesperson without researching other viable options. Properly researching different endeavours in life will help one focus on what is most important and effective, while weeding out sources of inefficiencies that impede reaching your goals. This article originally appeared on ValueChampion’s blog
Wine- History and Preparation
Natural wine is ancient, and therefore the latest trend. What makes a wine “natural”? When Jenny Lefcourt captive to Paris within the Nineteen to check French literature and cinema, she and her friends started drinking a very exciting style of wine. This wine tasted “totally different, and alive, and delicious,” she remembers. They found it in an exceedingly few bars, and later stumbled into a tasting of it hosted at a vicinity edifice. Now natural wine has become a word form of bourgeois style in sure social circles and on sure menus across the world. It’s become a supply of indie social capital, with wine labels that are as feverishly followed and obsessed over as album covers within the ’80s. However what makes a wine “natural” isn’t forever clear to customers who are additional accustomed to the under-$10 section at merchant. And it became the topic of heated dialogue within the wine world, with natural wine purists declaring it in virtue and thrilling style, and traditionalists criticizing the perceived flaws and even its idealism. But whereas natural wine is recently fashionable, it's not new: folks are creating hard fruit crush while not additives for thousands of years. (The history of sulfites complicates this; some folks believe that sulfites in one type or another were accustomed preserve wine as early because the eighth century before Christ.) “People assume that natural wine may be a cult or a replacement issue, however it’s the standard thanks to build wine,” explains Krista Scruggs, a wine maker and farmer based mostly in American state and Texas. “It’s typical wine that’s truly new.” Here’s what natural wine is, however we have a tendency to captive off from — and back to — it, and wherever it’s heading next. What it is Natural wine is additional of an inspiration than a well-defined class with agreed-upon characteristics. In its purest type, wine made of pure hard fruit crush “PEOPLE assume THAT NATURAL WINE may be a cult OR a replacement issue, however it’s the standard thanks to yarra valley restaurants. They serve typical WINE that’s truly new. Many people — winemakers, distributors, writers, — disagree with the term “natural wine.” Some like the phrase “low-intervention” wine, or “naked” wine, or “raw” wine. Scruggs calls her product “just fucking hard juice.” however “natural wine” is that the term that's most generally used, and anyone at a natural-inclined wine store, wine bar, or edifice can understand what you mean once you use it. For the aim of this text, I’m operating beneath the idea that natural wine isn’t a fraud, nor is its supporter’s neurotic, however rather that it’s an extremely debated and endlessly difficult topic that ne'er ceases to urge all manner of individuals irritated up. Also, the things are extremely usually delicious. Understanding natural wine needs a basic understanding of the trade method. Within the simplest terms, that method has 2 parts: growing and selecting grapes, and so turning them into wine through fermentation. Natural wine, then, is formed from grapes not sprayed with pesticides or herbicides. Natural winemakers handpick their grapes rather than hoping on machines to reap them. Once it involves turning those handpicked grapes into juice, natural winemakers have faith in native yeast, the things that’s whizzing around within the air and can land on grapes if you set them in an exceedingly vat for long enough, to line off natural fermentation. And in contrast to most typical winemakers, they don’t use any additives (like pretend oak flavor, pretend vanilla flavor, sugar, acid, egg white, etc.) within the trade method. Occasionally, some natural winemakers can add some sulfites, a preservative and stabilizer that winemakers are victimization longer than the other additive. Sulfites make sure that the wine you drink tastes roughly identical because it did once it went into the bottle. Natural winemakers either use no supplementary sulfites or use it in little quantities, whereas typical winemakers dissipate to ten times the maximum amount. They conjointly use it differently: typical winemakers add sulfites to grapes to exterminate natural yeasts, and so add additional throughout the remainder of the trade process; natural winemakers can add a bit simply before bottling. The purest of the pure — naturally hard fruit crush with no sulfites. So, from the above blog we can guess that you have some ideas about the ancient history and preparation of wines.
Lemon Garlic Chicken
INGREDIENTS: 4 chicken thighs, bone-in, with skin 2 tbsp olive oil 2 lemons 1 cup chicken broth 4 cloves of garlic, minced 4 sprigs of rosemary (optional; plus additional for garnish) 1 tsp garlic & herb seasoning salt and pepper to taste 5 young, thin multicolored carrots (optional; can be found at the farmer's market) handful of broccolini (optional; you can replace with other vegetables) DIRECTIONS: 1. Add olive oil to pan and turn stove to medium high. When oil becomes hot, add in chicken, searing both sides until they are brown and the skin is crispy. Turn off stove. Preheat oven to 425F. 2. Squeeze juice from one lemon. In a small bowl, combine lemon juice and 1/2 tsp garlic and herb seasoning. Brush chicken skins and top of chicken thighs generously with lemon juice mixture. In a separate bowl, add leftover lemon juice mixture, chicken broth, garlic, remaining garlic and herb seasoning. Taste to see if you want to add salt and pepper. If so, add at this point. Pour mixture into the pan. It should only cover the bottom of the chicken, leaving the skin exposed so it can remain crispy. 3. Thinly slice your second lemon. Place lemons into your pot, submerging them into the broth. Add rosemary to the broth if using. 4. Transfer pot from stove to oven. Let chicken bake for about 20-25 minutes until done. About 10 minutes before chicken is ready, Add carrots, placing them underneath the chickens. About 5 minutes before chicken is done, add broccolini, placing them near the carrots. 5. Garnish with more lemon slices and rosemary sprigs if desired. Serve while warm.
Baked Chicken Parmesan Meatballs in Tomato Cream Sauce
Meatballs in tomato sauce are the best comfort when you're fighting an unrelenting cold. This can be eaten alone with bread or they would be great over pasta, quinoa, on a sandwich or maybe even cut up and added to a pizza. Enjoy! Yield: 6-8 servings For the sauce: 1 (28 oz.) can whole tomatoes, liquid reserved 1 tbsp. butter ¼ cup finely chopped onion 1½ tbsp. tomato paste 2 cloves garlic, minced ½ tsp. red pepper flakes Salt and pepper, to taste 1/3 cup heavy cream or half-and-half For the meatballs: ½ cup dried panko 1/3 cup grated onion 1 tsp. dried parsley 1 tsp. dried basil ½ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 3/4 tsp. kosher salt ¼ tsp. ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1½ lbs. ground chicken 2 tbsp. olive oil To finish: 4 oz. shredded mozzarella 2 tbsp. freshly grated Parmesan 2-3 tbsp. minced fresh basil (optional) INSTRUCTIONS: To make the sauce, add the tomatoes to a blender or food processor. Puree until smooth, adding a bit of the reserved liquid if necessary to smooth the mixture out. Melt the butter in a large, deep skillet or sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook about 1 minute, until it begins to soften. Stir in the tomato paste, garlic and red pepper flakes and mix just until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in the tomato mixture, lower the heat to a simmer, and cook about 5-8 minutes, until the sauce is slightly thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the cream. Set aside. To make the meatballs, combine the panko, grated onion, parsley, basil, Parmesan, salt, pepper, garlic and egg. Stir together with a fork just until blended. Mix in the ground chicken and knead together gently until evenly combined. Form the mixture into meatballs about 1½-inch in diameter. Preheat the oven to 400˚ F. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the meatballs to the pan in a single layer. Let cook, turning occasionally, until all sides are browned. Once all of the meatballs are browned, place them in the pan with the tomato sauce. Sprinkle the mozzarella and additional Parmesan over the top. Bake until the cheese is fully melted and bubbling and the meatballs are cooked through, about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and garnish with the fresh basil. Serve warm.
Baked Chicken Nuggets Stuffed with Mozzarella
Ingredients For the chicken nuggets: 1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 2-inch pieces ½ teaspoon salt ⅛ teaspoon black pepper 1.5 oz. mozzarella cheese, cut into strips (about 1.5" x ⅓" x ⅓") 1 cup Panko bread crumbs ⅓ cup finely grated Parmesan cheese ½ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon Italian seasoning 1 tablespoon olive oil ⅓ cup all-purpose flour 2 large eggs, lightly beaten For the honey mustard yogurt dip: ⅓ cup Greek yogurt 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice pinch of salt and pepper, to taste Instructions Preheat oven to 400 F degrees. Spread Panko bread crumbs in a thin layer on rimmed baking sheet and bake for 3-4 minutes, until lightly toasted. Once mostly cooled, transfer breadcrumbs to a shallow dish. Stir in Parmesan, garlic powder, Italian seasoning and olive oil. Mix well. Set aside. Set a wire rack on the baking sheet; lightly coat rack with cooking spray. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Use a sharp knife to cut a pocket into each piece of chicken lengthwise, and make the pocket as big as possible without cutting through the backside. Stuff the mozzarella into the pockets. Make sure the strips go all the way into the chicken but doesn't come out the other side. Place flour and eggs in separate shallow dishes. Working in batches, dredge chicken in flour (shaking off excess), dip into eggs, then dredge in Panko mixture, pressing to coat. Transfer to the rack. Bake until the chicken is cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the yogurt, honey, Dijon mustard and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve the chicken with the honey mustard yogurt dip.
9
1
3