owley
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Use Breeze and Save Yourself from a DUI.

Having a car is great. Trying to decide when it's okay to drive after a few drinks is not. Meet Breeze, a personal breathalyzer. This app / wireless whistle will tell you what your BAC is. I think the coolest feature of this gadget is that it tells you when you'll be sober. I can already imagine how I would use this thing. I'll take a look at the "# of hours left to be sober" and compare that with loss of sleep and taxi fare. I am worried about a couple of things. We make stupid decisions when we are under the influence. What if more people choose to drive when they find out that they are not as drunk as they thought they were (still over the limit)? That's no good. Also, for me, driving after having more than 2 drinks was never an option. What if I am barely under the limit after having a couple of drinks? Before Breeze, I would have taken a cab since I just assumed that I was over the limit. But now, I'll wait to be just under the limit of DUI in the legal sense. Is more information sometimes bad? I think I am still going to get it.
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I also feel that even though you may feel fine at the moment, who knows how you will feel 10 or 15 minutes from now...some drinks do this to you...you feel fine and then BAM it hits you.
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