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How to Make Pasanjeok (파산적), a Savory Skewered Pancake from Korea

When I first started learning how to cook, my enthusiasm led me to trying my hand at a number of traditional recipes from Asia. Whether it was oyakodon from Japan or pancit from the Philippines, I grew more and more obsessed with learning the food culture of different regions. One of my favorite first experiences with a dish happened during a holiday called Seollal, the Korean New Year. I had been invited to a party to celebrate it where each guest was bringing their own food to share. My Korean teacher was bringing kimbap, a roll very similar to sushi, while another friend brought a very large tray of tteokbokki, spicy and soft ricecake that has the same 'guilty pleasure' appeal of a plate of macaroni and cheese here in America. But I was able to bring pasanjeok (also referred to as simply 'sanjeok' or 'sanjeok ggochi'). I'll always remember the time my friend Miyoung taught me how to make pasanjeok. She invited me to the small apartment she was living in, and all of the ingredients were already chopped up and ready for preparing. Together, we assembled the pasanjeok to look like colorful banners of celebration, and as she cooked each one on a frying pan, I stood nearby and watched each of the finished pasanjeok as she carefully arranged them on a nearby platter. Pasanjeok (pronounced Pa-sahn-johk) is a type of jeon - a pretty big category of Korean foods that can be roughly described as a savory pancake. Perhaps the most famous jeon is called pajeon, made with green onion. Other popular ones include kimchijeon (with kimchi) and haemuljeon (with seafood). Pasanjeok, however, is a type of jeon specifically associated with very special occasions, like Seollal and Chuseok, Korea's Thanksgiving. A lot of Koreans have fond memories of pasanjeok, as it is commonly made in big batches in the days leading up to family holidays, and many members of the family usually chip in to help prepare them. It's a lot of fun! So here is my recipe for pasanjeok. If you have trouble finding certain ingredients and don't live nearby an Asian market, I would suggest either omitting that ingredient entirely or seeing if that ingredient can be ordered online. Or you can easily substitute the fish smoked ham with Spam or swap out any of the other ingredients with mushroom, carrot, cucumber, or asparagus. (Just make sure you use green onion! It's 'pa' - meaning 'green onion' - sanjeok after all!) ----------------------------------------------------------- Pasanjeok (Skewered Green Onion Savory Pancake) 15 - 20 bamboo skewers, about six-inches in length (If you can't find any of that size, just buy longer skewers and cut them prior to building your jeon.) 1 bunch of green onions, cut into five inch lengths 1 package of imitation crab stick, cut into five inch sticks 1 package of fish-smoked ham, cut into five inch sticks 1 package of Korean pickled radish (danmuji), cut into five inch sticks (Buy the stick-shaped danmuji. The oval-shaped danmuji won't work for this recipe!) 4 large eggs 1 cup of flour 1 - 2 tablespoons of soybean oil 1. Make sure to cut each ingredient into equally sized strips. I usually use the danmuji radish's shape as a reference for width. 2. Carefully arrange each ingredient onto the skewer, keeping them at a generally uniform position and maintaining an alternating pattern throughout. The jeon in this picture, for example, is using a ham > danmuji > crab > green onion pattern. I usually stop around seven ingredients in. This should make about 15 - 20 skewers. 3. Once you are done arranging all of your skewers, crack the eggs into a shallow bowl and mix them well with a fork. Spread the flour on another plate, and lay out a clean plate with a sheet of paper towel on it to catch some of the excess oil once your pasanjeok is done cooking. 4. Heat the oil on a frying pan. Once the oil is at the appropriate heat for frying, take each skewer and cover all of the ingredients in flour before dipping it in the egg wash. Fry each skewer until each side is golden brown. 5. Continue to cook until all skewers are finished. You may need to add one more egg or a little more flour depending on how many skewers you've been able to make. 6. Serve warm and with an optional dipping sauce of 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon white vinegar, and a 1/2 tablespoon of chopped green onions. Enjoy! ** If you have any leftover sticks that you don't want to waste, I would suggest heading over to the Kimbap recipe @MasriDaniela posted a few months ago: http://www.vingle.net/posts/349235-Kimbap-time-ladies -- All the ingredients used in this recipe would be super delicious (and are pretty commonly found) in a traditional kimbap roll!
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Woooow ....I love those ...those days must do it! !!! Thanks @danidee .... @christy @nonabisi @nylamrehs @cheerfulcallie @saharhynjoong @floralyssa @pixiedust ladies I think this will be daebak
@MattK95 I love pickled ginger too. One time a few years ago, I had a dream that I was eating a whole bunch of pickled ginger right out of a jar. Hahaha I'll never forget that dream.
@danidee yes the White pickled radish is great, I also love pickled ginger, it's soooo tasty!!! ^^
@MattK95 I'm not a huge fan of the yellow pickled radish, but I loooove the white pickled radish cubes that come when you order Korean fried chicken. So good!
Hardly related to the Pasanjeok which looks delicious btw, but I looooove pickled radish :D
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Pikachu Buns
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How To Make Oyakodon (親子丼), Donburi with Chicken and Egg
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Kpop is Actually Born from Korean Protest Songs
Alright so I'm a total history nerd, I majored in East Asian Studies and eat stuff like this up. Read the full (long!) article here - I will try to explain it basically, but its really worth the read. Here we go: It all started with Japan. As you might know, Japan colonized Korea eventually trying to erase Korean culture all together on the peninsula. In the very beginning though, that wasn't the case. Japan was willing to share Korean and Japanese culture, and the Japanese and Korean elite often spoke together and traded pop culture. Japanese elite brought over Western-influenced music because of their connections with the Western world (which Korea didn't interact with other than missionaries at the time) The Korean elite wanted to be modern and successful like Japan, so they adopted this music (called Changga) as their new favorite genre. (You can hear a lot of European influences in early Korean music...) This is where it gets interesting. The Korean elite wanted to be independent of Japan. They wanted Korea to stand alone as a strong nation, not pushed around by China or Japan anymore. They stared the pro-independence movement. Now, most revolutions like this would turn to traditional music, traditional culture to strengthen the country (for example, Korea would use ancient Korean songs to protest the Japanese occupation) but the Korean elite didn't! They wanted Korea to be strong, and to be strong they felt like they needed to modernize - ie be like the West. They used this Changga music (ironically brought to them by Japan) to protest Japanese rule! To this day Korea is always trying to "keep up with" the Western world so that they can be considered modern and powerful. Most things that they do is to modernize and stay trendy because that is how the country has always defined strength. But then, Japan decided to make money off of that... Japan had seen its first real pop music hit in 1914. People were buying records, following tabloids, and really getting into pop culture. That was really the birth of the Japanese music industry. In 1926, Korea had a similar experience. A song called the "Death Song" appeared, sung by Yun Shim-Deok. The singer committed suicide with her lover right after the song was released and the story made HUGE headlines. It was chilling, 'romantic,' and dramatic. Korea ate it up. Japanese record companies came in and started selling the record, selling over 50,000 copies! (In 1926 that number is totally insane!) You can listen to the death song here: The record industry after that was run mainly by the Japanese yakuza and their partnered Korean gangsters. The industry was set up very similar to how it is now, with entertainment industries doing everything in-house (SM has specific song writers that only work for SM, and their artists are actors, singers, models, etc) This is also why so many Kpop artists become actors...because even back in the 1920s musicians couldn't make enough money so the real way to make a living was through acting. That still stands today. So, today's Kpop is based off of this first "Korean pop" hit (the death song) AND protest songs against Japan. So when people say that Kpop is just a copy of Western music, they're sort of right but not in the way that they're thinking. Yes, its a reflection of Western culture, but the reason behind it is that Korea has been fighting to be recognized as a modern, powerful force to be reckoned with since the early 1900s. They want people to know Korea is strong, modern, and a country to look up to, not look down upon. So the next time someone tells you Kpop is a lame copy of American pop - give them this little history lesson. Again, PLEASE read the full article - its so interesting! HERE it is!