Cards you may also be interested in
BTS Fire and WTF Is Tropical House?
Alright y'all, we're going to talk about a topic that affects each and every one of us: TROPICAL HOUSE. It's a subgenre of house music that is influenced by instruments such as steel drums usually used in Jamaican, Cuban, etc music. It's been getting more and more popularity these days but I was still surprised to hear it in at BTS song! It is most noticeable in Rap Mon's part at 2:15. That awesome sound in the back? That's classic Tropical House music! Here are some more examples if you dig that sound: Jeremih - Don't Tell 'Em Thanks to @Lizzeh for reminding me about this awesome example!!!! Justin Bieber - Sorry & What Do You Mean Beibs made his comeback completely backed by this music. It sounds fresh, fun, and you CAN'T STOP LISTENING TO IT. Kygo - Stay Often referenced as the king of the rebirth of TropHouse, Kygo is your go-to DJ if you want nothing but Tropical House in your ears. Skrillex and Diplo - Where Are Ü Now This was the song that really brought the sound to mainstream recently. Those "dolphin sounds" or however you choose to describe it...yup, TropHouse. Fifth Harmony - Worth It & Work It's leaking into the girl group pop scene too with Fifth Harmony using an almost 8-bit take on Trop-Pop. Still groovy. Jamie XX - Loud Places And then we have Jamie XX that combines his smooth sleepy sounds from the XX with the catchy pop of Tropical House. Needless to say, it was love at first listen. Even though it has existed for a long time (and the influences that inspired existed looooooooooong before) I'm glad to hear more of it now in mainstream music! Enjoy!
Black History Month: The History of Jazz
Let's start with the basics: Did you know that jazz was born in the US? Did you know that the drum set was invented by jazz musicians? Did you know that words like "cool" and "hip" came from jazz? It's more than just music to listen to in cafes and bars - it has an incredible story behind it. Here's a brief run-down, with the help of Scholastic's history of jazz curriculum! === Late 1800s The Blues The Blues was born in the South and was meant to express the pain and injustice faced by African Americans during this time. Inspired heavily by hymns and traditional work songs (thus the common use of call and response) this music used to accompany spiritual and social events. Blues set the foundation of jazz not to mention the inspiration for rhythm and blues, rock 'n' roll, and country music (think of Elvis Presley!) === 1900s New Orleans New Orleans is a melting pot of sounds. The French trumpet mixed with the Blues, traditional African drumming, ragtime, and military marching bands all came together in cacophony that brought on the birth of classic jazz music. Improvisation and accompanied dancing was common and the music filled the streets! === 1901 Louis Armstrong is born Louis Armstrong was one of a kind. His understanding of rhythm and his ability to improve made jazz what it is today. He is actually one of the most influential artists in the history of music. Born in New Orleans, on August 4, 1901, he began playing the cornet at the age of 13. He changed the way that jazz artists approached solos forever, and moved away from a more traditional Dixieland style. He played faster and louder than anyone had before. === Mid–1930s Swing Swing was born from the basic foundation of jazz. Swing as a jazz style actually first appeared during the Great Depression. The fast dance tunes were meant to lift the spirits of the American public, and it did! By the mid-1930s, a period known as the "swing" era, swing dancing had become our national dance and big bands were playing this style of music. Orchestra leaders such as Duke Ellington, Paul Whiteman, and Benny Goodman led some of the greatest bands of the era. === Duke Ellington A pianist, composer, and bandleader, Ellington was one of the founders of the big band sound. "Ellington plays the piano, but his real instrument is his band. Each member of his band is to him a distinctive tone color and set of emotions, which he mixes with others equally distinctive to produce a third thing, which I like to call the 'Ellington Effect.'" —Billy Strayhorn, composer and arranger === 1940s Bebop n the early 1940s, jazz musicians were looking for new inspirations, and a new direction. Out of this desire for something new, style of jazz was born, called bebop. It's fast tempos and complex melodies created a "jazz for intellectuals." The big bands with dancing crowds was replaced with small audiences that sat and listened to the music, trying to catch all the details. === Dizzy Gillespie Trumpeter, bandleader, and composer John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie was born on October 21, 1917. At the age of 20 he moved to NYC and started to experiment with jazz to eventually come up with the bebop sound. He was heavily inspired by Latin music and set musicians on the path towards modern jazz. === 1950s Latin and Afro-Cuban Jazz Adding in more inspiration to the already eclectic, dynamic genre is Afro-Cuban music. The combination of African, Spanish, and Latin American music changed jazz's sound and the culture surrounding it. I've seen plenty of people posting about Jazz in our music community and I'm sure you know much more than I do, so I'd love to hear your favorite stories about jazz history - they were wild times!!
Why Are These Kids At A Rave?
The 1990s were a simpler time - at least in the realm of kid birthday parties. You went out for laser tag or group-watched a movie. You had slumber parties or rented the 'party room' at your local roller rink. However, sometime between then and now, Skrillex happened - which brings us to the latest trend in children's birthday parties - KIDDIE RAVES. Introducing CirKiz - it's like that neon EDM-packed post-apocalypse you used to go to in college. But with safer goodie bags. You got your wildin' out, glowstick-wielding white bros. Guy with a cool haircut working the 1's and 2's. The person who's been going hard on fruit punch all night. And the one in the corner, currently regretting the fruit punch. CirKiz was created by some NYC-based, EDM-loving parents - Jesse Sprague and Jenny Song - who wanted to create a special place "where families can listen and dance to DJs, see live performances, and experience a nightclub environment in a safe, controlled daytime setting." Available in both New York and London, parents can choose one of several popular warehouse venues and trendy nightclubs for their CirKiz-sponsored event. One such venue, I was surprised to learn, is Cielo, a New York spot known for hosting some pretty 'high-brow' house and trance DJs. In fact, that's exactly where Jesse and Jenny first came up with their Cirkiz idea: "We had [our son's] 1st birthday party at Cielo. We invited friends with kids and friends without. It was so much fun for everyone we decided to make it an annual event but in different clubs. The message we got from all our friends was clear and consistent: 'You should do this professionally and turn it into a business... I'd pay to go.' So after years of just doing it for fun, we finally got our act together and did exactly that." Currently, CirKiz is hosting a 'winter series' of raves at NYC's Space Ibiza on Sundays, where ticket prices range from $15 - 20 per person. You can check out more details at their official website or you can be like me and just stare at these pictures, feeling equal parts confused and disturbed. With that being said: What do you guys think? Is combining kids and rave culture a good idea or bad idea? Let me know in the comments below. (Also shout-out to the LED robot in this picture up here. For a part-time job, that's - admittedly - rad as hell.)
Using Music to Move Past Differences in Kids on the Slope
Kids on the Slope is an anime that's about two things: jazz music and friendship. In one scene, the series captures overcoming differences in a friendship through the power of music or more specifically, jazz music. Before the scene above our two main characters Sentaro (the drummer) and Kaoru (the pianist) are not on speaking terms after Kaoru feels like he's been betrayed by Sentaro. During their school's recital something happens to the band that is supposed to play next and Kaoru volunteers to keep the crowd busy while the band gets everything together. There's something you should know about Kaoru, he's kind of a nerd. At the start of the series, he doesn't really have any friends, he's constantly getting bullied, and he's practicing classical piano pieces. That is, until he meets Sentaro, who -- for lack of a better term -- is kind of a bad boy. Sentaro doesn't go to class, he only plays the drums, and is constantly getting into fights. So when Sentaro steps on the stage to accompany Kaoru, it comes off as a big gesture. You can even see the surprise on Kaoru's face once he hears the drums start playing. As the song goes on, you can see their differences and anger towards each other disappear. The friendship they've made throughout the series up to this point takes the forefront. Jazz becomes their way of arguing with each other. There are moments throughout the medley where one musician stops playing and the other keeps going as if to say, "okay, I'm going to listen to your side of the story, now". The magical thing to me about this scene is how jazz -- or music in general -- is used as a tool to get through certain hardships. Through the way they play their instruments, we can see our characters have a discussion, get through their differences, and then remember what it's like to have fun with each other.