danidee
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How to Make a Kifta Pita, a Lebanese-Style Meatball Sandwich

Kifta is wthout a doubt the Middle Eastern recipe I cook the most, as it's perhaps one of the easiest out there. The standard recipe recommends lamb, but I usually use beef or a lamb/beef blend depending on where I go to buy the meat. A lot of Middle Eastern butchers already have pre-made kifta-seasoned meat, but I prefer doing all of the seasoning myself, throwing it all on the grill, and building my own delicious kifta sandwiches for dinner (as pictured)! It also tastes great molded into hamburger patties for a fresh Lebanese twist to your everyday hamburger. -------------------------------------------------------- Kifta (Lebanese-Style Meatballs) 2 pounds finely ground lamb meat (or beef) 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 cup parsley, finely chopped 2 - 2 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 1/2 teaspoons pepper and allspice A dash of cinnamon Pita or flatbread, cut into halves Lettuce Tomato Onion Pickled turnip, optional Tahini, optional 1. Mix all the above ingredients very well. 2. Take portions of meat, mold into rolls, lengthwise and around 3" long. (Or into round patties, if preferred.) 3. Broil over open fire until brown and tender on all sides. Place finished kifta into pita or flatbread to keep the kifta warm. Garnish the sandwich with onions, tomato, lettuce, turnip, and an optional drizzle of tahini sauce.
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@MattK95 Hahaha don't be sorry! Judging by what I write about, I can see how it can be a little confusing. ;)
@stargaze That sounds really good! I'll have to stop by the food court next time I'm at UCSD. I usually just swing by Tea Station, hahaha. @MattK95 My sister has been vegan for nearly 15 years, so I know faaaaar too much about vegan cooking and baking. Personally, I've been vegan/vegetarian/etc. on and off for a lot of my life, but right now I just eat mostly plant-based until I'm out to dinner with friends somewhere.
I would very much prefer lamb meat. They're so tender! Thanks for sharing @Danidee.
Sorry if it seemed like I was prying, just a little confused @danidee thanks for clarifying :)
I'm slightly confused as to wether you're actually vegan or not @danidee this does look delicious though :)
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