SabeenM
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Dinner Party Presentation

I love dinner parties. I love the relaxed atmosphere, I love seeing people semi-dressed up and smelling sweet, I love good food and I love the ambiance. Coming from a family that loves to entertain, the one thing that I've learned is that details matter. Flower pieces and displays always add a nice touch to indoor parties. The second and last photos are roses from our own yard. For appetizers, cheese is key. The first photo is goat cheese with a raspberry preserve on top- it's brilliant! The third photo are some simple onion and garlic cheddars. Add some crackers on a nice platter and you're done! We have also learned that one of the greatest drinks to serve is ice tea. You can make your own concoction, get the powder from the grocery store, etc. Guests can get creative with ice tea- mixing in whatever they desire or in kids' case drinking it plain. Always remember.... you can never have too much food. If there is one thing that can ruin a party, it's running out of food or having none! People like to eat :)
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Creamy French Vanilla Crème Brûlée
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Easy Spinach Artichoke Quiche Cups – Gimme Some Oven
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A Crème Brûlée, in Cocktail Form
As @marshalledgar recently observed, there truly is a made-up food holiday for every day of the year. And according to the powers that be, today is National Crème Brûlée day! Why do we Americans celebrate a dessert that the French, Spanish, and British all claim to have invented, you ask? Because it's PURE AMAZINGNESS. Delicate vanilla cream with a crunchy, crackling caramelized shell – come on, who wouldn't want to dedicate an entire day to singing its praises? Not all of us have the time or tools to whip up a crème brûlée at a moment's notice (although you totally should, using my recipe here), so I've researched an easier way to get your fix this holiday: the Crème Brûlée cocktail. There are plenty of versions out there, but so far, this one seems the best and most accurate in flavor. That's thanks to the homemade "burnt sugar"-flavored simple syrup, to give the cocktail a true authenticity. Give it a try tonight, and share your thoughts! Crème Brûlée Cocktail Original recipe by A. Huddleston of Cook In / Dine Out To make this incredibly delicious drink of the gods, you will need: 1 oz. vanilla-flavored vodka (like Stoli Vanil) 1 oz. heavy cream 1 oz. vanilla burnt sugar syrup (see recipe below) Assembling the cocktail is simple. Chill a martini glass in the freezer for at least 10 minutes. Stir the ingredients together, and then serve in chilled martini glass. If you have a cocktail shaker, try shaking the ingredients together with ice, and then straining into the glass for a colder final product. Vanilla Burnt Sugar Simple Syrup To make the easy homemade syrup, you will need: 1 cup water 3/4 cup sugar 1/2 vanilla bean pod 1. Heat the sugar in a small (8-inch) frying pan over medium heat. Leave sugar undisturbed until it begins to melt and then stir sugar as in melts and caramelizes until all the sugar has melted and it is a dark amber color. 2. Meanwhile, add water to a saucepan. Cut the vanilla pod in half lengthwise and use a knife tip to scrape the vanilla beans into the water. Add the pod halves to the water and bring to a boil. 3. Pour the burnt sugar syrup into the boiling water (be careful of sputtering, you may want to stand back a bit). Continue boiling and stir to dissolve any hardened clumps of syrup. Set aside to cool. Strain when cooled and store in a container in the refrigerator. I hope you all celebrate this lovely holiday with a sweet and creamy Crème Brûlée Cocktail. Enjoy!
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