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A visit to Yogya's latest eco-friendly hotel

Designing a hotel that’s different is always a challenge — there are limited ways to assemble blocks of concrete cubicles and make them desirable. One Yogyakarta hotelier is going green to lure visitors. Peckish guests too drained by Yogyakarta’s delights to descend to the open-plan kitchen on Greenhost’s ground floor can nibble a lettuce or pluck a tomato growing just outside their door. But they’ll be unable to immediately lay their hands on a hairdryer, even though their lodgings have all the facilities expected in a modern hotel, like Wi-Fi and cable TV. “That’s because everything has been designed to use little energy,” said Arbiter Gerhard Sarumaha, general manager of the city’s newest hotel. “Guests may borrow a dryer, but the rooms are limited to 1,300 watts. If they try to boil a kettle at the same time, the circuit breaker will trip. “The vegetables they can savor will be grown in a vast hydroponic array using polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipes. The system could produce 1.4 tons of fresh produce if all 9,000 plants are harvested at the same time. Excess food will be sold.” The developers of the three-storey Greenhost, which opened in December, believe it’s the first hotel in Indonesia built using recycled materials and following conservation principles. They say their building is unique because it’s making serious attempts to be ecologically friendly, artistically creative, energy-frugal, productive – yet still make a commercial return. Every room has an original local painting, sculpture or mixed-media piece, while the foyer restaurant doubles as a gallery. “This is an art space that accidentally also happens to be a hotel,” quipped Arbiter. It’s billed as a “boutique” hotel, though 96 rooms stretches the limits of that term. Much of the timber has come from pallets originally used as fork-lift platforms for goods stacked in warehouses. Pine pallets have a rough life and die young, splintered and crushed, destined to depart as heat and smoke. Snatched from the flames, de-nailed and sanded smooth to reveal color and texture, the wood lives on in walls, lockers, furniture and shelves. Contrasting the refined interior is exterior cladding of lumpy multi-sided off-cuts from a furniture factory in nearby Surakarta. These have been fixed to panels so every façade is different. It’s the same in the dining area, where the square table tops were originally steel scrap from a fabrication plant, smelter feedstock before being rescued for a furniture future. Neither the galleries wrapped around the hotel’s rectangular core nor the restaurant have ceilings, so the hotel’s intestines are exposed. When your coffee companion starts to bore, lean back and study the entrails of electricity, the color-coded noodles of plumbing and wonder what’s been digested and where it’s heading. It’s too early to know whether this factory feel and fog grey décor will be softened by the vines cascading from above and sturdy trees in tubs below. Inevitably, concessions had to be made. One that will trouble many overseas guests — the hotel’s prime target — is the use of grid electricity mainly sourced from coal-fired generators. “We wanted to use solar power but the economics didn’t compute,” said the hotel’s founder, Surakarta businessman Paulus Mintarga, head of CV Tim Tiga, the company developing Greenhost. “In many Western countries, electricity is expensive so the capital cost of installing solar panels makes commercial sense. Inevitably, electricity prices will rise in Indonesia and photovoltaic cell prices come down. “When that happens we’ll convert, but at present it’s cheaper to buy electricity from [state-owned electricity monopoly-holder] PLN, even though it’s an unreliable supplier.” So the hotel has installed a big grumbling generator, which takes the edge off the ambience when PLN fails to deliver. Work on the Rp 40 billion (US$3.3 million) project started two years ago on a downtown site, a 15-minute drive from Yogyakarta’s Kraton (Sultan’s palace). Jl. Prawirotaman has long been backpacker central, but Arbiter claimed the area was changing, with beards and sandals yielding to designer batik as antique shops sprout and hostels morph into hotels. Greenhost’s Internet prices for mid January are Rp 500,000 [US$40] a night, including breakfast and tax — a dive from earlier quotes of Rp 850,000 [US$68]. That’s mid-range for regional city accommodation in Java, though the 19-square-meter rooms are more Singapore-size than Indonesian. “In the future we have to become more efficient and inventive,” said Paulus, who created an eco-guest house in Surakarta called Rumah Turi. “People are moving out of rural areas and into the cities. As populations grow, there’s a demand for more productive land. This isn’t just a hotel — it’s also a farm. The plants being grown hydroponically will all be food, not flowers. “I’m a structural engineer and a former contractor in Jakarta, though my friends are architects, the discipline I like most. But architecture is just a tool, a means to an end. “We need to take a holistic approach to development and recognize the spirit of the place where we want to build. “I’ve long been interested in designs that use waste. I’ve seen what has been done overseas, particularly in Japan, but we must do things our way, develop our own Indonesian ideas. I want to use local products. “I tend to start from the materials and then look at the possibilities rather than beginning with a concept. Because I haven’t been trained as an architect I have the freedom to think differently. “The challenge will be to get the staff to appreciate that we are driven by the principles of care and creativity, so we have to run our own hospitality school [The plan includes multi-tasking, so the person who makes your breakfast may also make your bed]. “This is a commercial venture, and not just motivated by idealism. We have to make money and we will at a rate equal to standard hotels. At the same time we must do what’s right. I hope others will see what’s possible and follow us. “The future is sustainability.” - See more at: http://www.jakpost.travel/news/how-green-is-my-valet-24YudqaJjvSw0sn1.html#sthash.CWxaGuaJ.dpuf
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Farmhouse decor was an important part of the British rural life in the Victorian era. It consisted of attractive gardens, porches and the architecture that made it look like a cottage. It included plenty of trees and flowers to give it the look of a classic farm. The Victorian farmhouse may have included a table and chairs for a meal and several plant pots filled with bulbs and vegetables to add the sense of a small village or town in the countryside. If you want to add the same sense of country to your home, it would be worthwhile to explore the different types of farmhouse decor available.
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How To Make Mee Goreng Mamak (印度炒面), Fried Noodles with Indo-Malayan Flair
I love Indonesian food. Based on their history and interactions with the rest of Asia, the cuisine has subtle nods to Chinese, Thai, and Indian dishes, but with their own special (and usually nice and spicy) twist. Mee goreng is perhaps my favorite of the Indo-Malayan dishes. From the picture, it looks like a standard chow mein-esque stir fry, but the flavor involved is absolutely incredible and definitely sets it apart from its 'noodle cousins'. (Especially when you top it with fried onion pieces and just the right amount of sesame oil.) Mee goreng is such a popular dish that you can buy instant packages of it all over Asia. In fact, I have some friends who lived in Western Africa that enjoyed instant mee goreng as a steady staple through the week. (You can buy instant mee goreng at a majority of Asian supermarkets in America, but try this recipe for the real deal and super authentic stuff!) ------------------------------------------------------ Mee Goreng Mamak (Fried Noodles) 500 grams of yellow noodles Handfuls of beansprouts depend on liking 2 small tomatoes, quartered 2 small onions, chopped Handful of chicken breast meat, thinly sliced, or minced beef 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1 potato, boiled and cut into cubes 1 small size dry bean curd, cut into small pieces 3 tablespoons of cooking oil (I usually use soybean.) 1 tablespoons of minced green onion and garlic 2 fish cakes, sliced (optional) Handful of shrimp, de-shelled and de-veined, optional 1 green chili or Thai chili or red cut chili, optional 3 tablespoons of ketchup 3 tablespoons of chili sauce or chili paste 1 tablespoon of dark soy sauce 1 tablespoon of light soy sauce 1 teaspoon of garam masala/curry/turmeric powder, optional (but highly recommended!) For garnishing (optional): Some cucumber slices Some fresh coriander leaves or green onion Some lime or Calamansi lime (cut into half) Some deep fried shallots Some grounded peanut + sugar mixture Sesame oil 1. Assemble all the ingredients that need to chopped or sliced. In a big frying pan, sauté the onion and minced garlic until fragrant. Add in turmeric or Garam Masala (if preferred). Add the chicken breast/minced beef, stir fry for 1-2 minutes. Add the dry bean curd, fish cakes and potato cubes. 2. Add in the yellow noodles and stir fry until well mixed. If the yellow noodles is too dry, add about 1/4 cup of water. Add the tomatoes, prawns, tomato ketchup, chili sauce or paste, freshly cut green/red chili (if any). Stir fry until well combined (about 2-3 minutes). 3. Add in the beaten egg, sugar and salt to taste, followed by the beans sprout. Stir fry until the beaten eggs dries up. Off the heat and transfer to the serving plate. Top with sesame oil to taste.
The story behind the most expensive gourmet coffee in the world: Kopi luwak
The life of a civet cat, strangely known as the coffee rat in Indonesia or tree dog on the Indian subcontinent, is not at all that bad. In the wild, they are free to roam anywhere they fancy, from the tropical forests of Sri Lanka all the way to the dense jungles of Sumatra. They are solitary creatures for most of their lives, but are persnickety eaters and thus discard rotten fruit and diseased mammals. The males get together with their female counterparts whenever they have to, receiving the better end of the deal by mating with no strings attached. They are nocturnal save for when a bright moon comes out. Then they sleep all night like they normally do during the day. And as long as their intestinal tracts remain fully functioning, they will continue pooing out a tradable commodity, one that also happens to produce the most expensive gourmet coffee in the world: the kopi luwak. There are over a hundred types of coffee in the world but only three -- Arabica, robusta and liberica -- are farmed exhaustively and made commercially available. The luwak coffee can be made from all three types but result in varying tastes. The Arabica bean in Indonesia is the most popular for the luwak blend, as well as for non-specialty coffee consumption. With a name like “cat-poo-ccino” and Jerry Seinfeld’s blunt “cat shit coffee” description from his hit TV show, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, the luwak and its history in Indonesia is nevertheless by no means a laughing matter. Before the introduction of coffee plantations, civet cats and coffee production were an unlikely pair. The civet cat was in fact a creepy pest scurrying over rooftops and eating prize-winning tajen cocks. Their utility hadn’t been explored at all as coffee “fermenters” and their fecal matter was a mere inconvenience to the villager, as is dog crap to the jogger in New York City. The luwak’s prodigious poo-coffee discovery came when the Dutch launched their cultuurstelsel program of enforced coffee planting in Java in the 19th century. Due to exploitative practices, the local indigenous workers were forbidden to enjoy the fruits of their own labor. Of course, prohibition piques interest and so the workers gave their beans a go, but only after they were passed through the guts of the civets running amok on the plantation fields. Fast-forward one hundred and some years. In 2012, the value of coffee exports from Indonesia reached US $1.5 Billion. Seventy percent of Indonesia’s total coffee production was exported, yet how much the luwak contributed to that figure is largely unknown. Regardless, being a highly sought after specialty blend, cat poo coffee has proven to be a lucrative business attracting global consumers for its rich taste, as well as its novelty factor -- sometimes more of the latter than the former. Its labor-intensive production process, as well as scarcity on the global market, drives up its price to anywhere from $300 to $600 per kilogram, making it the most expensive coffee in the world. A cup in the US can go anywhere from $50 to $80. Though coffee estates are seeing a decline in Indonesia, large-scale “wild-sourced” luwak plantations are still in operation, mostly in Sumatra. There are also the small backyard ventures popping up here and there that are proving to be quite profitable enterprises. Harmoni Bali Organik is an example of a successful homegrown luwak plant run by Kadek Ardhi, 54, and Santhi, 51 -- a husband and wife team. They operate right from their traditional Balinese home in Bangli where civet cats roam naturally in the forests and are even brought in by farmers in exchange for a 25-kilogram bag of rice. Unlike the coffee’s history, Kadek and Santhi’s roots in the business are not as deep. “In 2006, I had a Japanese visitor who recommended I merge business with pleasure,” says Kadek, 54, while sliding a tray of Arabica cherries into a civet cat’s cage. “At that time I had only two civets and I kept them just for fun. But he recommended that I breed them and so my capacity quickly grew to 18. Every month I was visited by my Japanese friend who inspected the cages -- now I have 94 luwak and I export my special coffee to Canada and Japan.” The production of kopi luwak is by no means a complicated process. The civet cat sleeps all day with their eyes creepily open and wakes up around sundown. Santhi and her team then begin sliding trays of about a kilogram of Arabica cherries to each cat for dinner. They gorge until satiated, defecate, circle their cages for a bit and then go back to sleep. It was a surprise to see that they meticulously sift through the best cherries -- a selling point that inflates their price tags because of this ability to distinguish good beans from bad. Surprisingly, they spit out the fruit, which is then collected and used as organic fertilizer -- sometimes even dumped on the side of the road next to the plantations where the cherries originated. Their feces are collected in a sieve from right under them in the mornings. The cleaning process begins by laying out the feces on trays in the open sun. “We don’t use water in cleaning the feces,” says Santhi. “The sun does the cleaning through drying and it takes anywhere from one to two weeks, depending on the sun.” Much debate surrounds the luwak coffee’s taste, with many experts asserting that the quality is in fact quite poor and nothing to be excited about. Some connoisseurs swear over the coffee and will go out of their way to make a purchase. Some claim the taste to be less bitter and earthier, yet the overall quality and robustness of flavor varies widely region by region. For Santhi, luwak coffee from Java and Sumatra is spicy while from Kintamani it is a bit more acidic. Nowadays, the kopi luwak can be seen as a business model of micro-economy interconnectedness. Take Santhi and Kadek Ardhi’s plant, for example. Coffee cherries are purchased from a Kintamani farmer and arrive every day at the same time before sundown: two bags weighing anywhere from 95 to 100 kilograms. They hire local help to feed and tend the cats, maintain the cages and package the final product, which then goes to what many might consider a sampling showroom, or sales point, for tourists, in a forest near Ubud. However, one drawback to luwak production is that the Arabica bean is ripe from April to June in lower altitudes (700 to 900 meters) and from April until September in higher altitudes (900 to 1200 meters or even more), such as in Kintamani. Despite a season-dependent output, Santhi and Kadek still manage to produce 25 kilograms per month for the international market, as well as 50 kilograms for the domestic one. However, luwak or not, the irony is that coffee in Indonesia appears to be unpopular. According to investment statistics in 2012 the per capita consumption was relatively low at 0.95 kilograms, compared to Finland where it was 11.7 kilograms. Unscientifically and by observation only, it seems that the artificial variety is preferred by Indonesian consumers, a powdery kind, which in fact has less coffee and more sugar with creamer -- a blend that is atrociously sweet and lacks real flavor and effect. Coffee culture has yet to catch up, although domestic numbers are slowly growing. All in all, the luwak coffee, or any other Indonesian-grown coffee for that matter, is worth boasting about and for thumbing the nation’s nose at the ex-colonizers.
Can I Cancel My Alaska Airlines Flight?
Is there any kind of instant or sudden change in your travel plan made via air to your preferred destination? Then you always go for the flight cancellation which is the only way to get rid of such kind of things. Almost every airlines proffer the facility of flight cancellation and Alaska Airlines is one among those that also allows its passengers to cancel their flight tickets. Flight cancellation always subjects to the cancellation policy and by dialing Alaska Airlines phone number, you can obtain reliable information about the flight cancellation or you may also go through the mentioned instructions. Alaska Airlines cancellation policy 1. You are permitted to cancel your Alaska Airlines flight within 24 hours from the scheduled departure. 2. The flight cancellation is free if you cancel a flight within 24 hours of booking and cancellation made beyond 24 hours, will be subjected to a cancellation fee. 3. You will be charged $125 as a cancellation fee that also depends on the type of your ticket and duration of cancellation. 4. If your flight delayed or rescheduled, then you can also make a cancellation request without any fee. Alaska Airlines cancellation process If you want to cancel your flight ticket, then you can easily cancel it with the help of the below steps: 1. First of all, you should visit the official Alaska Airlines website. 2. You can click on the Manage Booking section. 3. Enter your last name and booking number into the given field. 4. Now you can click on the Continue tab to find your booking. 5. After that, select your booking and then click on the Cancel flight tab. 6. Now you can easily follow the on-screen instructions to cancel your flight ticket. You can also dial Alaska Airlines customer service phone number, if you are still not competent enough to cancel your flight as the team is capable enough to resolve all kinds of queries related to the flight cancellation policy and process.
How can I check-in at Singapore Airlines?
Singapore Airlines is one of the top-notch airlines that flies to national and international flights worldwide. As we all know, when we book a flight using the official website of a particular airline for Singapore airlines booking, it becomes imperative for us to check-in using the same at least 24 hours before the actual departure time of the flight. In this article, you will learn about the steps that you need to follow if you want to check into your flight using the online method. Steps that you need to follow if you want to check-in using the official website of Singapore Airlines Here is a set of some simple steps that you need to follow if you want to check into your flight that has been already booked at Singapore Airlines. · First of all, you need to open up the website of Singapore airlines using the appropriate combination of email address and password that has been allotted to you. · The next step is to navigate the check-in option that you can find on the top of the home page. · Fill in the details that you have been asked on the page that appears before you after clicking on the check-in option. · The next step is that you need to submit all the details that you have entered on the page so that you can get to your ticket and the check-in confirmation. · The updated status of your check-in will be shared with you on your email address that has been registered with the online airline portal. Lastly, you can collect the boarding pass from the airport. This is all you need to know about the check-in procedure at Singapore Airlines. Feel free to contact Singapore airlines customer service for further details.
Travel Bucket List
Hey everyone! Ever sense I could remember I have always wanted to travel, it is my dream to see the world and experience everything earth has to offer. This is why I need your help: Help me construct a bucket list by answering this question: What is your most favorite place to go? (vacation or for other reasons) Everyone can give as many places as you want but make sure that it is specific. So if you chose China; What part? Any specific things or places there that make it your favorite? Thank you so much to any who participate, it means a lot to me and I hope one day I can cross off every one of your places off the list. :) If you don't want to be tagged anymore just message me :) Also take a look at @danidee on Vingle! @JPBenedetto @ButterflyBlu @deilig @buddyesd @araiannagorniak1 @NSSagasshi @Taijiotter @VixenViVi @InPlainSight @candyland1986 @MinionPeach17 @PurpleChick @jokes @RaquelArredondo @Marichel @mistymaity @Karthikkrazzy1 @RajeshSamel @GalaxyTacoCat @VeronicaArtino @DeniseiaGardner @B2STANG88 @purplem00n23 @Arellano1052 @shantalcamara @TerrecaRiley @FabiolaGavina @adorkabledolly @CassidyCathell @kpoplover1995 @kisnow @sugajin94 @ElizabethT @ParkMeiFan @netchiBates @fallendendenjr @BluBear07 @EmilyMurphey @loftonc16 @JessicaChaney @WiviDemol @HardikPatel @SreeniNair @missvicky69 @biancaP @tyragallegos10 @EllieDean @esmeraldagutirr @Amye1 @DaniVO @MattK95 @Matokokepa @Narissatayy @CandaceJordan @missophiestik @Animaniafreak @GingerMJones @MauSenpai @crazyflames12 @FallenDeath @ZoeMe @EricaRFonseca @AkiraCondry @nikkinjg @doraga @JonPatrickHyde @biancadanica98 @malibella @Safaa12 @DenieceSuit @SarahVanDorn @misskurmet82 @chris98vamg @wjdeogks76 @RobertMarsh @nenegrint14 @Rhia @smnthcarter773 @NoSixJersy @MimiZu17 @jcl4rks0n @vanemunos @MissB82 @VIPforever123 @YessicaCardenas @jiggzy19 @TheGreenEyedPup @vuihi @UrShawol @amobigbang @ChristopherSuta @esha @wllmvns @NishatH @CleoHoney @AimeeH @notgucci3 @JezziCrypt @KellyOConnor @LeilaB @hopeismyanchor @AluSparklez @KiKi29 @VarunNambiar @EdenSisco @EugeneAngleber @LAVONYORK @KendaylBasden @KpopGaby @amandamuska @NerukaWong @BiblioLady
Bromo Ijen Tour Travel Indonesia
Bromo Ijen Tour - Mount Bromo and Kawah Ijen Tour Package is the best Volcano Tour Pacakge East Java. Mount Bromo Ijen Tour are the top travel destinations in East Java Indonesia, are active volcanos situated in a surreal but spectacular massive caldera. While very busy with tourists, almost to the point of being a put-off at the sunrise viewpoints, it is definitely still worth a visit. Bromo Ijen Tour has interesting volcano which offering Mount Brommo Sunrise with best landscape and Ijen Crater Blue Flame with rare Blue flame in the world. We provide about several interesting Bromo Ijen Trekking Tours Package like Mount Bromo Ijen & Ijen Crater Tours Start From Singapore, Yogyakarta, Surabaya, Malang & Bali. Manage your trip planer by exploring our pumbling services. The Genera Bromo Ijen Tour Itinerary: Day 1: Surabaya - Lumajang Homestay (5 hours driving) Day 2: Tumpak Sewu Waterfall Tour - Hotel in Banyuwangi (5 hours driving) Day 3: Ijen Blue fire Tour - Hotel around Mt Bromo (5 Hours driving) Day 4: Bromo Sunrise + Bromo Crater Tour - Surabaya (3-4 Hours driving) Mount Ijen Tour From Bali Mount Bromo Ijen Tour Package from Bali 3 Days Tour - Travel from Bali to East Java on a Mt Bromo Ijen Tour 3 days overland excursion. Visit Mount Bromo and Kawah blue fire inside the Mount Ijen Volcano. Mount Bromo Ijen Tour From Yogyakarta Mount Bromo And Ijen Tour From Yogyakarta - The general itinerary is start from Yogyakarta to Mount Bromo Tour to Ijen Tour and finisht in Bali with duration minimum 3 days 2 nights. We usually pick up our custumers from Yogyakarta at 07:00 Am early morning (it takes about 10-12 hours driving) but there's an alternative way to get to Bromo Ijen Tour From Yogyakart, it's fly to Surabaya or take a train to Surabaya, then The Bromo Ijen Tour Package 3 Days starts from Surabaya. The easiest, most comfortable but not necessarily the fastest way is hite private car directly from Yogyakarta to Mount Bromo. Our tour agency will help you with arranging it. Best way to get to Bromo Ijen Tour from Yogyakarta Yogyakarta to Bromo and Ijen overland trip will take 10-12 hours driving. For your option, you can use Plane, train, rent car with driver. the ceapest way, you can travel by train to Gubeng Trainstation then we will pick you up from Gubeng To Bromo and Ijen Tour. Train Sritanjung Depart from Yogyakarta (7.15 am) arrived in Probolinggo (4.00 pm) You can fly from Yogyakarta Adisutjipto International Airport (JOG) to Juanda International Airport Surabaya as there are plenty of direct flights between these two cities. Mount Bromo Ijen Tour From Surabaya Surabaya Bromo Ijen Tour Package - It's better to go to Surabaya from wherever you start from KL Malaysia/Singapore/Bangkok, rent a car to Mount Bromo then Ijen volcano and return to Surabaya to fly to Yogyakarta/back to Malaysia or Singapore the next day.
3 luxury sustainable spas in Bali
Bali has a lot of spas; in some areas, every third shop is a spa. All varieties of spas can be found as well -- from local to international award winning spas. In recent years, a lot of people have become more conscious of what they put on their skin. The skin absorbs up to 60% of what you put on it, so with increasing amounts of chemicals in many products, it can lead to allergies or worse. One way to avoid this is to choose a spa that uses naturally made products and takes an approach that is kind to your skin. Local Indonesian jamu (traditional medicine) methods have always done this but a few luxury spas in Bali not only use natural products but also take the spa experience to a new level of comfort. The Spa at Alila Soori Villas The Spa is housed in a sustainably built house with a view of the Indian Ocean in front. Entering this warm and opulent hideaway, the central spa area is dominated by a beautiful pool that instantly adds a sensuously relaxed atmosphere. The traditional Balinese Beauty Ritual is two hours of pure bliss. Balinese lulur is an ancient village remedy with its origins from the rice farmers of Bali that is recognized as traditional medicine. The treatment is believed to help warm the body, relieve aching joints and help in the recovery of troubled or loose skin. Locally sourced sandalwood, fennel seed, star aniseed, eaglewood and fenugreek are blended together to use during this healing remedy. It is a 60 minutes Balinese Massage, body scrub, body mask and mini facial. The massage uses natural oils and you can choose a beautiful aromatic blend to suit your mood. After the massage, you are gently scrubbed using the herbal warming mixture and then wrapped in a cocoon while the gently heated massage table ensures every pore is cleansed and every muscle relaxed. The therapist performs a revitalizing mini facial as you relax on this wave of warmth. Not only do you feel like you are floating on a cloud after the treatment, but you are also assured that only the most natural ingredients have been used during this process. If you loved the products used, there are a wide range of Alila Spa products for sale to take with you. A particular favorite is the Black Volcanic Soap that is made from Balinese volcanic lava. Ojas Spa, COMO Shambhala Estate This famed wellness retreat outside Ubud is the ultimate luxury hideaway in the forest with an ethos based around holistic principles. If you are not staying here, you can come and get pampered at the beautifully serene Ojas Spa. Ranges of treatments are offered here, including hydrotherapy and Ayurveda treatments. This Zen space is very soothing and, set among vast sounding grounds; it is a quiet retreat to indulge in a treatment. Signature massages are done using specially blended oils made on the estate, sourced from local products and 100 percent natural. The Shambhala signature massage is an hour-long treatment and uses innovative long strokes and medium pressure to both relax and revive spirit and mind. Set in a light airy room looking onto a garden, complemented by clean lines to leave the mind uncluttered, this deeply therapeutic technique performed by a highly skilled therapist feels more like a four handed massage thanks to the expertise of the therapist. This is a deeply relaxing and aromatic experience that leaves the skin smooth and supple. Facials are also available using a range of their homemade products called PURIFIES. These products are based on the principles of aromatherapy, incorporating only premium grade oils free of parabens, petrochemicals, artificial fragrance and color. The PURIFY Holistic Facials are deeply calming and catered to your skin type using these products, along with steam and specialist massage techniques to cleanse and rejuvenate the skin. Not only are the products used at the Ojas Spa kind to your skin, but also to the surrounding environment. Fivelements Puri Ahmisa This healing hotel is located just outside Ubud in a scenic spot with the river flowing through. The spa is perched right along the riverbank so you hear the flow of water easing past as you are experiencing some incredibly therapeutic and natural treatments. This award-winning spa is unique in that not only does it have a wide variety of beauty treatments, but also healing rituals are on offer from Balinese healers and priests. This means that both body and soul can be nurtured naturally in this wonderful sustainably built bamboo spa. Acupressure with Pak Ketut is designed to trigger the body’s self-healing abilities and uses energy transfer to help heal. After starting with transference of energy, the ritual is designed to relieve both physical and mental strain. This can relieve deep-seated tension and trigger the healing process. The healing rituals harness the power of both natural herbal ingredients and energy. The beauty rituals use a wide variety of natural elements found throughout Bali. Probably one of the most healing plants is the coconut. Virgin coconut oil is one of the most healing oils, naturally antibacterial and nourishing. The Coconut Harmony treatment is a deep massage with this oil, followed by a moisturizing bath of coconut milk, the pure blended aromatic Shakti Oil and scattered with Frangipani flowers. A hewn rock bath gently sheltered by foliage looks over the flowing river below melding nature and the spa together. This wonderful bamboo structure is open meaning that it is a totally sensory experience within nature.