vagabondTK
5,000+ Views

2-3a. TAXIM square in ISTANBUL (2nd day)

1. on a street of TAXIM 2. One of things i should have bought... so miss this shoes! kinda distinct and cute item i think! 3. an interior shop which feels turkish real! 4-5. GALATA Tower! (Gakata Kulesi) which as i rember, is for protecting turkey from Jenova people in 14~15 centuries. nowaday it's possible to look around whole ISTANBUL on the top of this building. 6-8. a sandwich craft man made me an wonderful sandwich. it was very cheap and delicious of course! 9-10 on the main street of TAXIM SQUARE. 'Plz enjoy my stories. i am a vagabond from South Korea:) after finishing turkey story, i'll upload Spain storty!! my instagram id is vagabondTKKK'
2 Comments
Suggested
Recent
It seem like your travels are going great now Spain 😊enjoy wish I was in your shoes ! Oh
so great ! put more pics.
Cards you may also be interested in
Iced Turkish Café au Lait (with Vegan Alternatives)
Iced Turkish coffee has been my go-to coffee recipe for the past few months now. I spent a majority of my 20s working behind the counter at Starbucks, and ever since I've been having to brew coffee at home again, I've found myself getting a little too creative with what I can do with my coffee knowledge. I love Turkish coffee. I love the punch it packs, I love the smell of it boiling over my stove, and making it is so much fun. Different from your standard Mr. Coffee machine, it really feels like you're an active and important part of the brewing process, even moreso than with a French Press. If you don't want to have to get a brass coffee pot to enjoy the taste of an iced Turkish latte, you really don't have to! Follow this recipe, and you'll be enjoying a nice and refreshing (and incredibly aromatic) iced latte inspired by the flavors of the Middle East. ------------------------------------ Iced Turkish Café au Lait 1/2 cup milk (or any non-dairy milk. I usually use Silk soy milk, unsweetened.) 1/2 cup half-and-half (or any non-dairy creamer. I usually use Trader Joe's Organic Soy Milk Creamer.) 1 tablespoon sugar 6 whole cardamom pods, crushed 1 cup strong brewed coffee, chilled (I prefer using the Turkish coffee brewing method, which I described in this card: http://www.vingle.net/posts/522373-Making-Arabic-Coffee-Kahwa-at-Home-Bonus-Fortune-Telling-Video -- However, any brewing method of your preference should work for this recipe.) 1. In a small saucepan stir together the milk, the half-and-half, the sugar, and the cardamom pods, bring the mixture to a boil, stirring until the sugar is dissolved, and let it cool. 2. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve set over a small pitcher, stir in the coffee, and chill the mixture, covered, for 20 minutes, or until it is cold. 3. Divide the iced café au lait between 2 stemmed glasses filled with ice cubes.
Making Arabic Coffee (Kahwa) at Home + Bonus Fortune Telling Video!
The greatest experience a true 'caffeine head' can have is sitting down to a cup of Arabic coffee. Arabic coffee, often referred to as 'Turkish coffee' as well, is something my grandfather used to jokingly insist put "hair on your chest" based on its strength and thicker mouthfeel. Instead of straining the ground coffee through a French press or a standard Mr. Coffee, the coffee used for Arabic style coffee is ground into a fine powder and boiled into the water. It's definitely quite a kick! One of my favorite parts of drinking Arabic coffee growing up was having my fortune read to me from the remaining coffee grains that rested at the bottom of my cup. After we're done drinking our coffee, we flip over the small demitasse cup we're drinking it from and allow for the rest of the coffee to collect in the saucer. When you flip it back over, the 'fortune teller' of the family looks for symbols in the grinds and tells you what to expect in your future. This is, of course, just for fun, but it doesn't make it any less exciting! (Check out the attached video of a Syrian family reading one another's fortunes to see what I mean.) Here is a quick recipe for how to make Arabic coffee at home. If you don't want to invest in a brass coffee pot, you can use a regular saucepan for a similar result. ----------------------------------------------------------- Arabic Coffee (Kahwa) 2 cups water 3 to 5 tsp. sugar 6 tsp. Turkish coffee (or any medium to dark-roasted coffee ground to a powder) 3 cardamom pods or 1/8 tsp. cardamom powder 1. In a brass coffee pot or regular saucepan, bring water and sugar to boil. 2. Add coffee and cardamom, stirring constantly. When mixture comes to a boil and becomes frothy, remove from fire and stir until froth has receded. Repeat this process two more times. 3. After the coffee has foamed and subsided for the third time, pour into Arabic coffee cups (or demitasse). Serve the coffee very hot - a minute or two after pouring in cups to allow the grounds to settle in the bottom. Note: The amount of coffee and sugar may be increased or decreased to suit your taste. Makes six servings. ----------------------------------------------------------- Serve this with a fresh plate of baklava (using the recipe I posted in my 'Middle-Eastern Recipes' collection) and a small bowl of Jordan almonds for a complete Arabic style dessert spread!
How House Swapping Works?
House Swap is often not the first thing that comes to mind when someone thinks about going on vacation. But, If you're exploring vacation packages to popular tourist destinations such as New York and Paris that could cost you thousands of dollars for a hotel room or at least hundreds to book on Airbnb, it's time to check out cheaper alternatives. What if we say, your stay can be free? Yes, it's true with a house swap. It is a practice in which two parties agree to swap their accommodation without any cash exchange. Now, here how House Swapping works, and how to get started: - Step 1: Understand home swapping Today, there are so many platforms where you can sign up, create your house listing, find and swap homes across the globe. You can peruse listings of hundreds of home swappers worldwide. You can swap in one of the two ways: a direct, two-way exchange where you can swap your house for someone else’s. The other way being the one-way swap, where you live in someone's home, while your house is empty. Since no money exchanges, you can plan long vacations, even for months, knowing that your accommodation costs won't sky-rocket with each passing day. Step 2: List your home for the swap. Don't think you’re not eligible for a home swap if your house is not in a tourist hotspot or a picture-postcard chateau. People these days are exploring all kinds of destinations to escape the crowd and finding peacetime with family. Also, it is a no-brainer to highlight all the key points that make your house special, whether it’s the private swimming in the backyard, nearby hiking trails, lovely neighborhood, or proximity to public transportation. Be sure to upload pictures of your house, highlighting how spacious and comfortable it is compared to hotels. Step 3: Have a Clear Chat Once you come across someone ready for a vacation home swap with you, it is imperative to have a chat, either over the home swapping messenger or via Skype/ FaceTime. You can also ask them to provide a video tour of their house and ask all the questions that you might have. This will help you to ease all the anxieties with regards to exchanging each other's abodes. Step 4: Tell the neighbors Once the deal is locked, let the family next door know about your travel plans, so that they're not surprised seeing another family set foot in your house. This will help you keep a tab on your swapper and leave your fellow swapper with a local to count on for any need. Step 5: Be Smart with your Valuables Have a rare selection of porcelain dolls? First-edition of novels? Or expensive crockery? Don't hesitate to keep them in secure spots. Lastly, give them a warm welcome, just like you do if your sister or a close friend comes to visit your house. So, lay in supplies for your home swapper.
Ljubljana - The Capital of Slovenia
Ok guys, a lot of you know I am from Slovenia, and since the country is not widely famous, I decided to write a card to kind of present it to you. So, I hope you will like my quick presentation of a capital of Slovenia, and also a place where I spent most of my time, because of studying. Ljubljana has no world-famous attractions, which is just great: there's no need to hop from one place to another, taking photos and crossing the items on your checklist. You have all the time to stroll around and enjoy the city itself. In the summer, its center hosts a number of city sponsored events, from children workshops and public playgrounds on the streets that get closed for traffic for the occasion, to Trnfest's off-beat street performances and musical events of all genres. In autumn it shows its academic face as it fills again by students of the state's largest university to whom the city owes much of its youthful character. Cold December days are warmed by thousand of lights, the new year's decoration conceived by local artists, and by food and drinks sold from street stands on the banks of Ljubljanica river. After surviving the boring gray remaining of winter, the city erupts again with spring flowers planted on its streets and crossroads. Located at the middle of a trade route between the northern Adriatic Sea and the Danube region, it was the historical capital ofCarniola, a Slovene-inhabited part of Austria-Hungary, and it has been the cultural, educational, economic, political, and administrative center of independent Slovenia since 1991. Ljubljana ("lyoob-lyAH-nah") is a charming city full of artists, museums, and galleries. With a population of 300,000, it is one of the smallest capital cities in Europe. The main language of the city is unsurprisingly Slovenian. Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian is generally understood by most people and frequently spoken fluently by adults, especially those over the age of 40. Most of citizens speak at least some English, many, especially those under age of 30, speak it fluently. It's also worth trying any major European language you speak as you just might be understood. Triple Bridge (Tromostovje), designed by Jože Plečnik, consists of three separate picturesque bridges located next to one another. The neighboring Prešeren square with the statue of Slovenian greatest poet France Prešeren is the central location of downtown Ljubljana and a common meeting point. Across Ljubljanica to the left is Open Market and the Dragon Bridge. Squeezed between the castle hill and Ljubljanica river is the old town with two squares, Mestni trg (City square) with the Robba fountain and the city hall behind it, and, further on, Gornji trg (Upper square). Well preserved medieval buildings now house local designer shops, and several popular cafes and restaurants. Although they may look creepy, the perfectly safe narrow lanes lead to charming little squares and buildings. Zmajski Most (Dragon Bridge), completed in 1901, designed by Croatian Jurij Zainovich. It is guarded by four detailed dragon statues from the city's coat-of-arms. You have to be careful around the Dragon Bridge area, as it is on a major busy road just outside the pedestrian zone and near misses (and worse) between inattentive tourists and traffic are common. Ljubljana Castle - You can catch the "tourist train" from the Triple Bridge to the castle, or walk up the (quite steep) hill to the castle. The tower has magnificent views all over the city. You can also see the Sava River and Kamnik Alps in the distance. Btw, I live just under the castle, so 10 minutes walk to to top. Metelkova City - A self-declared autonomous culture place to gather for alternative artists, many subcultures and youth. What used to be a military barracks is now full of underground artists, bars and nightclubs. Metelkova can get crowded on Fridays and Saturdays. This is an awesome place to party. Tivoli Park is the main city park. You can sit down on a park bench and enjoy the sun. There is also a childern's playground and a lot of paths to walk. Ljubljana Zoo is considered one of the most beautiful Zoos of Europe. I don't this so, tho. Ljubljana Botanic Garden is the oldest Slovene cultural, scientific and educational institution. It was founded in 1810, the time of the Illyrian Provinces, as a garden of native flora and a section of the Central School (École Centrale). In the garden is also tropical glasshouse. So, this is a quick intrudaction to the Capital city of Slovenia, Ljubljana. It is a city worth visiting. It is suitable for younger and older generations. It is quite small (tho, the biggest city of Slovenia), so everything is reachable by your feet. We don't get a lot of famous people, like bands and singers here, because we are so small, tho Paris Hilton did came to Slovenia, but it was by mistake haha. I hope you like this card, I would be really happy if you like it, clip it and comment it, because I want people to see and get to know Ljubljana. And if you want it, I can post pictures and write about other beautiful, even more greeny places of Slovenia, I know @TerrecaRiley would love it! And if you guys (@marshalledgar @nicolejb @alywoah @onesmile @2littlelegs @allischaaff @NixonWoman @skee292 @shannonl5 @danidee @LauraFisher @buddyesd @LizArnone ...) every find yourself in Europe, somewhere near me, you are more than welcome to come and visit. We'll do some cocktails!
(no title)
House exchange is an excellent way to enjoy family holidays on a limited budget. The cost of Accommodations is usually the most significant chunk of any vacation spending. So, the cutting costs on this considerable expense can unlock doors of possibilities.  The potential savings allow you to spend more money on sightseeing, food, entertainment, and shopping at a vacation destination. But, before you finish your home exchange deal, it is imperative to know the optimum way to communicate with your exchange partner. Clear All Your Doubts & Queries Right Away Once you’ve received a query or someone has replied to your request, the next step is to talk to your potential home exchange partner. It’s best to clear all your questions and eliminate all doubt before you go ahead with the swapping deal. Inquire about the amenities in the house, such as the number of bedrooms and bathrooms, the configurations of beds, Internet connectivity, LED Screen, patio garden, or pool. If you’re traveling with kids, make sure you talk about the things to do and see in the proximity that is kid-friendly.  When asking queries have realistic expectations. Don’t expect their house to be as perfect as your home, and you may not have all the facilities. Don’t feel timid about asking any type of questions, like how are the neighbors, where are the most convenient dry cleaner, etc. What’s important is to be open and transparent with our swapper. Exchange Options In the end, if you don’t want to arrange a direct exchange meaning you live in someone else’s residency, while they live in yours. You can opt for an indirect exchange, whereby you use their property even if they don’t use your property. Agree on the Exchange Dates During the initial discussions with your home partner, it’s critical to agree on the travel dates. You don’t want to find yourself in a situation when you’ve arrived at their place after a 7-hour flight, only to find that someone else is still at the property. Also, be as flexible as possible with your dates. If you are getting a great exchange at a location you always wanted to visit, flexibility always helps. Converse on the Platform It is of paramount importance to ensure that all the discussion and decisions must be kept on the home exchange platform itself. This way, you can stay clear of all potential hiccups or confusion along the way and can be managed by the customer services team of the exchange site. A reliable exchange verifies the property of swapper and their details to ensure a smooth, hassle-free experience. Layout the Swapping Deal Details Be clear and concise with your home exchange partner with regards to exactly what is included in the exchange. This might include such mundane actions as to what to do with the dirty towels & linen once you leave their place after a vacation; this is to avoid last-minute swapping mishaps. Wrapping up Finally do sufficient research to zero in on a trustworthy home exchange company to achieve complete peace of mind that everything is taken care of.