danidee
5,000+ Views

Shakar Lama (شكرلمة‬‎), Cardamom & Almond Tea Cookies from Iraq

If it hasn't been completely obvious by what kind of recipes I tend to post, I am completely in love with desserts and other sweet flavors that incorporate very tea-inspired ingredients. Whether it's lavender, orange blossom, bergamot, or cardamom, I love the unique fragrance it gives recipes and the subtle nod it sends to some of my favorites in Middle Eastern and South Asian cuisine.
These cookies, simple butter cookies enhanced with the flavor of cardamom, are called quite a few names in the Middle East. In Iraq, they are called Shakar Lama and topped with a slivered almond or a roasted pistachio. In Israel, Jordan, and Lebanon, they are referred to as Hab-El-Hal and sometimes the nut is exchanged for powdered sugar or toasted sesame seeds. Whatever you call it or however you decide to garnish it, you will still end up with a completely satisfying plate of cookies that makes a perfect partner for your favorite cup of tea du jour! (I highly recommend serving it alongside a pot of this Lebanese cinnamon-anise tea.)
INGREDIENTS:
1 cup rendered (clarified) butter or ghee (You should be able to find clarified butter at a grocery store like Trader Joe's, but check out this video if you want to clarify the butter you might already have at home.)
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 eggs
4 cups all-purpose flour
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 teaspoons cardamom powder
Roasted pistachios or almonds for garnish, optional
2 tablespoons powdered sugar for garnish, optional
DIRECTIONS:
1) Cream butter, eggs, and sugar.
2) Mix flour, baking powder, cardamom, and salt. Add gradually to the butter mixture.
3) Add milk or water if needed to form dough (consistency of bread dough). Roll dough 1/2" thick and cut with cookie cutter. Place on baking sheet. Bake for 12 minutes in an oven preheated to 375 degrees.
4) If garnishing with nuts, press one slivered almond or one pistachio to the center of each cookie halfway through baking. If garnishing with powdered sugar, sprinkle it on top of each cookie once they have fully cooled.
4 Comments
Suggested
Recent
I will bring the best tea, so can you share the cookies with me @danidee? lol
@noorkhlil I love Arabic food too! Especially when I am not feeling well. My grandmother and mother used to cook it for me growing up so it's definitely a comfort food! :)
Arabic food is awesome love شكرلمة
@iluvdurian31 Yes duh. The tea party starts now. ;)
Cards you may also be interested in
Halawet El-Jibn (حلاوة الجبن), Dessert Rolls of Sweet Syrian Cheese
I love any Middle Eastern dessert that is made with sweet cheese and semolina, and this one is definitely high on the must-make list for all of you who might just be starting out making and learning about the desserts of the region. I love the little pockets filled with sweet Syrian cheese and just enough syrup to make this a very decadent dessert. If you don't live in close proximity to a Middle Eastern market, I will make sure to point out where you can make easy (and really common!) substitutions with ingredients from your local grocery store in the ingredients section. Halawet El-Jibn, Syrian Cheese Dessert Rolls (Makes around 12 rolls) INGREDIENTS: 1/3 cup butter 1/2 cup semolina 1/2 cup farina (Farina is the same thing as Cream of Wheat.) 1 pound fresh Syrian (Akkawi) or mozzarella cheese, sliced (You could also do a mix of mozzarella and ricotta cheeses.) 2 cups ashta custard (or marscapone cheese) 2 tablespoons pistachios, ground To make Attar (thin Arabic simple syrup) - 2 cups sugar 1 1/2 cup water 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon orange blossom water (or rose water), optional DIRECTIONS: 1) Start by making the simple syrup (also known as 'attar'). Mix the sugar and water and bring it to a boil. Add lemon juice and boil for 7 more minutes. When cool, add orange blossom water. 2) In a large pot over medium heat, cook butter, semolina, and farina for 3 minutes. Add 1 cup of attar to the pot, stir, and cook for 3 minutes. 3) Add mozzarella to the pot, and cook, stirring vigorously, for about 3 minutes or until cheese is melted. Pour 1/2 cup attar onto a baking sheet and spread out to coat all sides. 4) Pour cheese mixture onto the baking sheet, and using the back of a wooden spoon, spread out to the size of the baking sheet. Cool for 15 minutes. 5) Run a knife down the baking sheet lengthwise, making two cuts in the sheet and forming three columns. Then make three more cuts width-wise, so you have 12 equal-size pieces. 6) Place 3 tablespoons ashta custard or marscapone at one end of each piece, roll, place seam side down on a plate.To serve, sprinkle each piece with ground pistachios and a drizzle of the remaining attar syrup.
Katayef (Arabic Sweet Dessert Pancakes)
Recently, one of my cousins decided to have a 'baking day' where he made a big and beautiful plate of katayef, which not only got me all sorts of salivating but also inspired me to introduce katayef to the rest of you! I feel like many cultures have something similar to katayef, a dessert pancake filled with chopped nuts and spices like cinnamon and nutmeg. In India, for example, certain varieties of gulab jamun are dumplings will with nuts. In the Ukraine, varenikis is a dessert similar to the apple dumpling, which swaps out apple with chopped nuts, sweet cheeses, and berries. And in South Korea, of course, there is the street food, hotteok, a pancake literally filled with warm sugar, spices, nuts, or sometimes seeds. Katayef is a pancake made with smeed, also known as 'farina' or 'fine semolina'. It is then filled with chopped nuts, spices, and sugar before being folded over and pinched closed to create dumpling shape. Among the Middle East's Muslim population, katayef is most often enjoyed during Ramadan season as a delicious way to break the fast. However, it is also enjoyed throughout the year as a staple dessert on special occasions. Here is the recipe for katayef in two variations - with walnuts or with sweet cheese (known as katayef assafiri). Not only is katayef fun to make, but it's also beautiful in every stage! Try it out the next time you want to surprise friends with a fun and delicious addition to the usual dessert spread. ------------------------------------------------------------------ Katayef (Stuffed Pancakes) To make Thin Attar: 2 cups sugar 1 1/2 cups of water 1 tbsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. orange blossom water (Mazaher), optional Mix sugar and water and bring to boil. Add lemon juice and boil for 7 more minutes. When cool, add orange blossom water (optional). Makes 2 1/2 cups of Thin Attar. To make Pancakes: (Note: To make the cheese-stuffed katayef, use half the amount of these listed ingredients.) 4 cups smeed (Farina) 8 cups water 1 cup flour 1 package yeast Dash of salt 1/4 tsp. baking soda 1 cup rendered (or clarified) butter 2 cups Thin Attar (see recipe above) To make Walnut Stuffing (Option 1): 6 cups walnuts, chopped 1 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 cup granulated sugar 2 tbsp. rendered (or clarified) butter To make Cheese Stuffing (Option 2):** 1 1/2 lbs. sweet cheese (Syrian or Ricotta) 1/2 cup sugar 1 tbsp. mazaher (orange blossom water) 1. Mix all stuffing ingredients and set aside. 2. Mix smeed, flour, and salt. 3. Place warm water in an electric mixing bowl. While mixing on high speed, add the smeed mixture gradually to form a thin pancake mix. 4. Dissolve yeast in 1/4 cup of water and a dash of sugar. Add to the pancake mixture. Mix for 1 more minute. Set aside for 40 minutes, stirring every 7 minutes (so water won't separate from smeed to avoid a lumpy mixture). Add the baking soda and keep stirring. When the dough bubbles, it is ready to be baked. 5. Use an electric frying pan set at 450 degrees. 6. FOR NUT FILLING: Pour 1/4 cup dough and cook like a pancake, on one side only. Remove from fine when pores form on the surface of each cake. Place the pancakes on a smooth surfaced towel until they cool. 7. Fill each pancake with the stuffing mixture. Fold by pressing edges together to make a semicircle. Brush each on both sides with warm butter. 8. Place on a baking sheet and bake at 400 degrees in a preheated oven for 10 minutes, or until light gold. 9. Remove from oven and dip in cold syrup (thin Attar). Makes about 35 pieces. 6. FOR CHEESE FILLING: Pour 2 tbsp. dough and cook like a smaller pancake circle, on one side only. Remove from fine when pores form on the surface of each cake. Place the pancakes on a smooth surfaced towel until they cool. 7. Stuff the pancakes with the cheese stuffing, closing one edge half-way to look like stuffed shells. 8. Do not dip in syrup. Pour 1 tbsp. of thin Attar on each. 9. Decorate with ground pistachios or one red preserved cherry for each shell, optional.
You'll Never Guess What People Eat At The Movies Across The Globe
Yuck. There are hundreds of countries around the world sitting in movie theaters across the globe. One big difference is the food they eat while in the audience. From dried bugs to salted candies, world customs really have their own distinct palette. Though Americans believe there's nothing in the world that could be better than a nice bag full of buttery popcorn, they are in for a huge surprise. Check out the movie theater snacks from around the world. You're going to be shocked. USA: Salted, Buttery, Popcorn It's crunchy. It's addicting. It's SO American. Popcorn is a very traditional snack without a ton of calories...that is, if you don't drench it in a pool of butter and salt. Popcorn has had a long standing reservation in our culture, primarily since corn is such in abundance within our country. We've muti-purposed corn to be just about anything but popcorn is still our favorite creation. Just remember, a small popcorn won't get you through intermission. A large popcorn will make you feel fat. But who cares, right? Great Britain: Sugared Popcorn Why am I not surprised that Great Britain would have a seamlessly more proper snack? Compared to American, the Brits always seem to do the exact opposite. From my personal view, I just don't understand the thrill of sugary popcorn. However then again, kettle corn and caramel corn is a huge success in the States. Brits are notorious for their bitter drinks such as coffee and tea paired with a very decadent and sweet dessert. I guess it's only fitting, pinkies up. Japan: Iwashi Senbei The first idea that popped into your mind was probably not that these are sardine rice crackers. The crisps are baked in sugar and soy sauce to give them their distinct taste. Rice is a very traditional food within the country so it's no surprise it is a snack as well. And with Japan being a very dependent country on its seafood industry, it's obvious that a leading snack brand would be fish based. Still interesting. Brazil: Roasted Ants Okay GROSS. As an American, I will never understand the love for eating bugs. We get it, they are packed with a ton of protein and have a nice crunch. But it's so taboo in American culture. On the other hand, Brazilians loves them. It's an aphrodisiac, or food that stimulates sexual desire, which could be the reason for why Brazilians are such a fan. Talk about a passive aggressive way to show your date that you want to hook up. Norway: Dried Reindeer Meat Somewhere in the North Pole, Santa is crying. This food seems so fitting though for the region. Reindeer meat is cut and then dried for a chewy taste. Very similar to beef jerky in the States. Reindeer meat boasts very low fat and high protein. However, I can't seem to feel sympathy for Rudolph & his gang once they find out that the Norwegians are snacking on their friends. Guess Norway is going to become the land of misfits toys soon enough... South Korea: Dried Cuttlefish I guess this goes hand in hand with popcorn in the Asian nation. With a meaty texture and briny flavor, apparently South Koreans can't get enough. It can be seasoned in a variety of flavors. Though they're also fans of roasted chestnuts, dried cuttlefish still frequently comes out as the fan favorite. I still don't know what a cuttlefish is. Russia: Beluga Caviar This is reserved for the rich and only the rich but a very common wealthy delicacy. Though the average folk may not be accustomed to eating the beluga caviar themselves, they know exactly who is receiving it when they attend the movie theater. Apparently movies in Russia are a more fancy affair, something Americans and other world countries would gawk at. With Russia being known to have extreme customs, this one tops the cake. Greece: Souvlaki Okay, this looks delicious. Lamb or beef souvlaki will be a fit for an Grecian attending an outdoor movie. They're tender and savory and it's already making my mouth water. Grecians are notorious for having the best food in the world and it's no surprise that their movie theaters also come with a wide delicious variety of choices. Please fly me to Greece because I'm starving. Netherlands: Salty Licorice This could be the most hated snack in America. Black licorice is a very distinct taste that very few people enjoy. In America, our black licorice contains a lot of sugar. However in the Netherlands, they salt their licorice with ammonium chloride which gives eaters a tongue-numbing sensation. Is this candy a drug? No thank you. India: Samosas This is my favorite. Look how good that looks! Bollywood theaters are all the rage in India far more popular than any Western movie. Samosas are potato stuffed pastries that taste as good as they look. With Bollywood movies comes a delicious combo of chutney and cheese sandwiches and vada pav, potato fritters in a bread bun. I could definitely ship this idea in the USA.
14 Mind-blowing Dessert Lasagnas!
I guess these people never got the memo about lasagna being a dinner food – and oh man, am I glad they didn't. These innovative kitchen wizards have turned a saucy Italian cheesefest into a gourmet dessert. This is a food trend that I have NO doubt we'll be seeing soon on upscale dessert menus around the world. It's hip, it's totally different, and it's just the right amount of weird to tickle the imagination. See what you think – which one of these fantastical desserts would you most like to try? (I've tried to give credit where credit is due. All the recipes are linked below; just click on the word "Recipe." Photos belong to respective owners.) :) Chocolate Lasagna Brownies, chocolate pudding, and Oreos – oh my! Add some whipped cream, and you've got a lasagna. (I never, ever thought I would EVER say that sentence.) Recipe by Rachel Schultz, A Household Almanac Apple Pie Lasagna Let me be clear: this is not your grandmother's apple pie. Oh sure, it's got apples, cinnamon, and sugar – but it's also got caramel cream cheese filling, Heath bar toffee bites, and a touch of maple syrup. I have only one word: WANT. Recipe by Beyond Frosting Pumpkin Pie Dessert Lasagna I don't know if they necessarily needed to specify that this was a "dessert lasagna" – I think that's pretty clear from the whole "pumpkin pie" part. But I digress. We're talking pumpkin, Cool Whip, pumpkin spice chips (which exist, apparently!?) and chopped pecans. It might be 91 degrees out today, but suddenly I'm feeling a little autumnal! Recipe by The Cookie Rookie, inspired by Beyond Frosting (who is apparently our dessert lasagna MVP!) S'mores Lasagna And speaking of Beyond Frosting, she's also responsible for this dare-I-say GORGEOUS creation topped with gooey toasted marshmallows. S'mores Lasagna may be an improvement on the already impossibly wonderful campfire dessert, because it's got two types of graham cracker (original AND chocolate), marshmallow fluff, whipped cream, and – for the mess-haters among us – you can eat it with a fork. Recipe by Julianne Bayer of Beyond Frosting (the dessert lasagna goddess herself. soon we'll all be wearing t-shirts with her face on it.) Brownie Brittle Strawberry Lasagna Before we get too carried away in our decadence, Julianne (yep, we're on a first name basis now) has whipped up a lighter version of dessert lasagna featuring a cheesecake filling, dark chocolate pudding, and plenty of strawberries. See? It's got fruit! It's obviously healthy. Yet again, recipe by my idol, Julianne Bayer of Beyond Frosting Nutella Cheesecake Lasagna Okay, so maybe the photography skills are a little lacking on this one, but the concept is so flawless that I had to include it. Nutella and cheesecake, married into one perfect lasagna that is then dusted with brownie mix and chocolate chips. I can't really explain how much I'm salivating right now. (Sorry for that wonderful image.) Recipe by Modern Christian Homemaker Paleo Chocolate Lasagna Eating clean? Don't worry! We've still found the perfect dessert lasagna for you. Interesting ingredients in this one include coconut palm sugar, almond butter, apple cider vinegar, and shredded zucchini. I won't pretend to understand how it all works, but I will trust the author when she says it's delicious. Maybe. Recipe by Vanessa Barejas of Clean Eating with a Dirty Mind (which is an awesome name for a blog) Fabulous Fruit Lasagna Whoa, a dessert lasagna that actually uses noodles! I bet you were wondering when one of these was gonna show up. This lasagna is a delightful conglomeration of fresh berries, mascarpone and ricotta cheeses, brown sugar, nutmeg, cloves, and a pinch of chili powder. Not what I was expecting! It can also be made, the author suggests, with chocolate pasta. Recipe by F.H. Browne, posted on Just a Pinch Chocolate Toast Crunch Lasagna Did you know that Cinnamon Toast Crunch has a chocolaty cousin? Chocolate Toast Crunch adds a special, well, crunchiness to this dessert lasagna. Its creamy filling has a hint of almond flavor. Mmm. Recipe by Cheeky Kitchen, posted on Tablespoon Frozen Snickers Peanut Butter Lasagna It's been pretty hot out, so why not stick your dessert lasagna in the freezer? Dry roasted peanuts, caramel sauce, and little pieces of Snickers? This is exactly what I want to be eating right now. Recipe by Not Your Momma's Cookie Oreo Pumpkin Lasagna Maybe you can't get enough of dessert lasagnas. Maybe you want to try more than one of them. Why not do it at the same time? This recipe is a combination of pumpkin pie and Oreo dessert lasagnas – and I can't think of a single reason it wouldn't be delicious. Recipe by Kitchen Nostalgia Chocolate Peanut Butter Cup Lasagna But come on guys, let's be real: this is the dessert lasagna you've been waiting for. Layers of creamy and chocolatey deliciousness topped with mini Reese's cups? Game over. Recipe by Marty's Musings Chocolate Candy Lasagna This take on chocolate lasagna tops it off with yummy and colorful crushed M&Ms! And then you have your choice between caramel and hot fudge drizzle toppings. But I say, Vinglers... why not both? Recipe by Princess Pinky Girl (yes, that is her real name) Chocolate Lasagna 2.0 And finally, we've got one last spin on chocolate lasagna from Center Cut Cook. It features a thick Oreo crust, a sweet whipped cream cheese filling, chocolate pudding, and lots of tiny chocolate chips. I think the width of the crust layer and the crunchiness of the mini-chips set it apart from other versions! Recipe by Center Cut Cook Which one of these crazy creations are you trying first? For more recipes, dessert and otherwise, be sure to follow my Cooking collection :) @jlee37 @buddyesd @danidee @TerrecaRiley @LizArnone @alywoah – can you BELIEVE these?!?!?
Your New Favorite Tabbouleh Salad Recipe (Vegan)
I love Middle-Eastern salads. I am a big advocate of eating tons of Middle-Eastern salads when you're on a diet. Not only are all the ingredients so colorful and fresh, but the lemon, mint, and olive oil so essential to these dishes create such a perfect combination of flavors that you don't even realize just how healthfully you're eating! Tabbouleh salad is perhaps my favorite one, and I remember growing up, tabbouleh was one of those few things (minus cold pizza) that tasted arguably even better a few hours later. Similar to a panzanella salad, the wheat absorbs all the delicious ingredients if it sits a little longer! Don't believe me? Let this taboulleh sit in your fridge for at least an hour before eating it, and you'll see that it was definitely worth the wait! ------------------------------------------------------------- Tabbouleh 1/2 cup fine burghul (cracked wheat) 2 large tomatoes, diced 1 bunch green onions, chopped 4 bunches parsley, chopped 1/2 bunch mint, chopped (or 2 tbsp. dried mint) 1 large cucumber, peeled and chopped 1/2 cup olive oil Juice of 3 lemons 1 tbsp. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper Wash Burghul. Drain and place in a large bowl. Add all chopped vegetables and mix well. Add olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Mix again, and serve over fresh green lettuce. ------------------------------------------------------------- You could eat this with a fork, but perhaps my favorite way is scooping it up with leaves of romaine lettuce, slightly similar to how you would eat a lettuce wrap. It's delicious!
Falafel Burgers with Tahini Sauce, an American Favorite with a Mid-East Twist!
One of my favorite local restaurants is called The Roxy in the small beach community of Leucadia. A staple stop on the historic Pacific Coast Highway, the Roxy serves anything from American to Italian to Greek to Mexican - even freshly made ice cream! But they are probably most famous for their fresh falafel balls, which they prepare is an assortment of ways. You can get falafel as an appetizer, in a pita, or on a salad, but their falafel burgers are what hits The Roxy's menu out of the park! Here is a recipe inspired by the Roxy's falafel burgers. Fresh falafel is not only incredibly delicious, but also extremely good for you! Make these burgers the next time you want to put a little fusion in your standard burger spread. You won't regret it! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Falafel Burgers with Tahini Sauce 2 cans of chickpeas 1 cup of onion 3-4 garlic cloves 2 tablespoons lemon 4 teaspoons olive oil 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. black pepper 1 tsp. ground coriander 1 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. all-spice 1 cup of breadcrumbs, divided For the Tahini Paste 1/4 cup ground sesame paste (tahini) 1/4 cup hot water 3 tablespoons of lemon juice 2 cloves of garlic salt to taste For the falafel burgers: 1. Chop onions and garlic and throw them into a mixing device with lemon juice, olive oil, chickpeas, and seasonings. 2. Pour mixture into a large bowl with 1/2 of the breadcrumbs and mix until firm. 3. Form patties and then dip into leftover breadcrumbs on both sides. 4. Heat a skillet with some olive oil and cook on 2-4 minutes on each side, or until falafel burger is golden brown. 5. Serve with buns and toppings of your choice. For the Tahini paste: 1, Add ingredients for tahini paste into a blender and blend until creamy. 2. Serve with your falafel burger.
How To Build An Authentic Falafel Sandwich (Vegan)
Visiting the Getty Museum is probably my most favorite reasons to drive out to Los Angeles with my friends. It's like Disneyland for art nerds, where every large building houses an immeasurable amount of visual history and work by many of the famed masters. However, all Rembrandts aside, the Getty Museum is also really close to a Zankou Chicken, a Lebanese 'fast food' restaurant that serves up bang-for-your-buck hot shwarma and falafel sandwiches. It's become a tradition of mine to stop off at Zankou after a full day of art-viewing to get tasty sandwich with my friends. So good! One of the things that makes Zankou my favorite is how they build their sandwiches - much more traditionally than most other places that serve falafel. (And while things like the 'falafel burger' might be fun every once in a while, sometimes you just want to eat something that tastes like your Mom made it, you know?) So, inspired by Zankou Chicken's falafel sandwichy goodness, I've decided I wanted to give you all a recipe showing how to make some delicious (and not dry!) traditional falafel sandwiches. Try it the next time you want to get a little more 'international' with your lunch! ------------------------------------------------------------------ Falafel Sandwiches (serves 4) 4 cups chickpeas, dried 2 large onions 1 whole head of garlic 2 bunches parsley Hot banana peppers to suit your taste Pickled turnips to suit your taste 1/2 a medium-sized cucumber, sliced 1/2 a tomato, sliced 2 tsp. cumin powder Salt and pepper to taste 1 tsp. baking powder 1/4 tsp. baking soda 2 - 3 loaves of pita bread 1 cup tahini paste 1/4 cup lemon juice 1/2 - 3/4 cup water, as needed 1/2 - 3/4 tsp. salt To Make Tahini Sauce: 1. Combine tahini, lemon juice, and two cloves of minced garlic in a bowl and stir to combine. 2. Add the water a little at a time as needed to form a smooth, creamy sauce approximately the thickness of heavy cream. 3. Season to taste with salt and more lemon juice, if necessary. To Make Falafel: 1. Soak the chickpeas overnight. Drain. 2. Combine beans, onions, garlic, parsley, and hot pepper in a food processor. Add salt, pepper, cumin, and baking powder. Mix thoroughly. 3. When ready to fry the Falafel, add baking soda. Shape into patties in 1 1/2" in diameter and 1/2" thick. (Small 'meatball' sizes are okay too!) Fry in deep hot oil until light brown and crisp. 4. Serve hot with tomato slices, cucumber slices, banana peppers, onion slices, and/or pickled turnip in pita bread in the form of a sandwich. Add the tahini sauce. ------------------------------------------------------------------ If you don't have four people to share this with, no worries! The falafel batter can be easily frozen and stored for the next time you want to make yourself a falafel sandwich. Just remember to thaw and add the baking soda just before frying.
Walnut Baklawah Rolls (Arabic Baklava)
Baklawah is one of those Middle Eastern recipes that is truly a labor of love. It takes a couple hours to prepare, so it is often reserved for special occasions. Baklawah is best paired with some Arabic style coffee with just the right amount of cardamom. Impress your friends by bringing freshly baked Baklawah rolls to your next get-together! ------------------------------------------------------- Baklawah Sticks To Make Attar (Syrup): 2 cups sugar 1 cup water 1 tbsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. orange blossom water (Mazaher), optional 1. Mix sugar and water and bring to boil. 2. Add lemon juice and boil for 7 more minutes. 3. When cool, add orange blossom water (optional). Makes 2 cups of Attar. To Make Baklawah: 1 lb. Filo Dough 3 cups walnuts, chopped 1/3 cup confectioner's sugar 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1 cup rendered (clarified) butter 1 1/2 cups Attar 1. Mix nuts, sugar, and spices. 2. Cut rolled Filo Dough int 3 parts. 3. Place 3 sheets lengthwise on the table and brush butter between layers. Place 2 tbsp. nut mixture on the narrow side of sheets, folding 1/2" from each side and roll. 4. Repeat the process with the rest of the dough, placing the sticks in a greased pan. 5. Brush with butter. Bake from 1 1/2 to 2 hours or until golden brown, in an oven preheated to 275 degrees. 6. Cool for ten minutes and pour Attar. ------------------------------------------------------- Cheese Variation: Use 1 1/2 lbs. of Syrian sweet cheese or Ricotta in place of nuts and spices. Follow the same procedure, and pinch rolls with a fork before baking. If desired, add 1 tsp. of orange blossom water and 2 tbsp. of sugar to cheese.
How to Make Apricot Fruit Leather Roll-Ups (Vegan)
Apricot fruit leather - called 'lavashak' throughout the Middle East - is a favorite snack of children of the region similar to the appeal of Fruit Roll-Ups here in the United States. They're chewy, sweet, and made with virtually 100% fruit, making them a much healthier alternative to most other snacks out there. Growing up, my mother used to buy lavashak in huge packages at the Arabic market. But this was far before Internet recipes, the trend of dehydrating fruit, and the 21st century DIY ambition. (I'm dating myself a little, but I digress.) Basically, what I'm trying to say is making your own lavashak at home is so easy and probably much easier than my family had realized. And not only does this recipe work great with the traditional choice of apricots, but pretty much all stone fruits, including peaches, cherries, and plums! ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Apricot Fruit Leather (Lavashak) 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 cups pitted and diced fresh apricots 1/2 cup sugar (or to taste, depending on the sweetness of the apricots) 1. Preheat the oven to 150 degrees F (165 degrees C), or the lowest setting you have. 2. Combine the lemon juice, apricots and sugar in a saucepan. Cook over medium heat until sugar has dissolved. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. 3. Cover an 11x17 inch pan or cookie sheet with a layer of plastic wrap. Pour the pureed fruit onto the plastic and spread evenly to within 1 inch of the edge. 4. Bake for 4 to 6 hours in the preheated oven, using a spoon or a pair of tongs to keep the door slightly ajar, or until the puree has dried and is no longer sticky. Once dry, you can cut it into strips and store in an airtight container.
Hindbeh bi Zeit (هندبة بالزيت), Lebanese Endive Salad (Vegan)
First off, I just wanted to thank you all for all of the positive feedback I've been getting from my Traditional Recipe collections. If you have a bit of a wanderlust spirit, but you can't really afford to get out there and travel, I think being able to cook the traditional foods of different regions is a fun and challenging way to feel a little bit more connected to these cultures. For those of you who don't know, I actually have two different Traditional Recipe collections, one for Middle Eastern Recipes (like the one you see here) and one for Asian Recipes, which includes cuisines that span from India to Japan to Malaysia. (For those of you who are looking for Vegan or Vegetarian content, all of my vegan recipes in these collections are labeled appropriately, so feel free to dig in with the rest of us!) The following recipe, as well as much of the other recipes in this collection, is from a small cookbook of recipes that has stayed within my family for many generations. Hindbeh bi Zeit literally translates to "Dandelion Leaves with Olive Oil", but for this recipe (and for your ingredient hunting sake), we are going to be working with endive, which is from the same family and shares that same bitter flavor that pairs extremely well with lemon and oil. This salad is so beloved in the Middle East that it is often pitted against other salads like tabbouleh and fattoush for the title of the region's favorite. Try this recipe as a healthy side to your usual dinner. You can even skip the cooking part entirely and eat this as a very light endive salad. Whichever works for you! Hindbeh bi Zeit, Lebanese Endive Salad (Serves 4) INGREDIENTS: 2 bunches of endive 1 large onion, chopped Juice of 2 lemons 1/4 cup of olive oil Salt and pepper to taste DIRECTIONS: 1) Wash endive well. Drain and chop. 2) Place in saucepan and cover with water. Let it boil for 2 minutes. 3) Drain in a colander and squeeze all water out. 4) Saute chopped onions in the olive oil. Add endive and saute for 3 minutes. 5. When cool, add salt, pepper, and lemon juice.