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10 Things You Hate At Movie Theaters
1. Wrappers/Slurping/Eating PLEASE OPEN YOUR CANDY BAR BEFORE THE MOVIE. You know exactly what I'm talking about as if hearing your popcorn crunch in your mouth wasn't enough. It's always the same person throughout the entire movie constantly rustling their fingers through a bag of plastic to get one last Skittle. They're so immersed in the movie that they forget that plastic makes noise. Also, slurping that $6 small slushy is just as obnoxious as you think it is. You can hold on to your manners and still enjoy your movie. 2. Awkward Couple Making Out In Back Row Just ew. There are hundreds of thousands of places to be intimate with your partner. However, for some reason, movie theaters seem to be a hotbed for this kind of activity. You always know who the couple is too because they don't scan the audience when they walk in or stop on their way to the top debating as to where they should sit. They go directly to the top preferably in the corner where the step safety lights seem not to reach. They wait patiently until the movie begins and then before you know it, they might as well be having full on sex. Please keep the thrill of making out with your significant other somewhere else. 3. Children They kick the seats. The bounce between chairs. They get scared and snuggle up to their mom. They laugh at all the wrong times. They drop their candy everywhere and talk the entire movie. They're kids. It's easy to say we were the perfect children in this kind of situation even though we know that we were in the same position once upon a time. However, bringing your child to a PG-13 movie or above is completely off limits. Kids get a free pass at G-rated movies, completely understandable. However, once children begin to infringe on teenager and adult viewing activity, there's an issue. 4. The Middle-Aged Lady Who Cries Next To You Every sad movie always results with some middle-aged lady two seats down from you bawling over some minor upset in the movie. It begins with a slight tear completely unnoticeable but then grows into a full flowing waterfall. She keeps sniffling, you then see her make her move to find tissues in her purse, and she just sits there in complete misery. You feel awful and you can feel her rain cloud spreading to you. Pro tip, if you know you're at a chick-flic or sad movie, find the most masculine guy there and sit near him. One, you'll avoid tears. And two, if he starts crying, it's karma for going off of gender norms. 5. Movie Previews God forbid you arrive to the movie on time. The movie previews are always at least 15-30 mins long. I feel like I need an intermission after them because they extend far longer than need be. It's genius marketing really regardless if I'm a fan or not. I will admit some movie previews are enticing and make me more inclined to go see a movie however most of the time you're watching a preview for a movie that won't debut for another year and a half. No thanks. 6. Irrational Fears (Yet So Rational) Is. There. A. Shooter. Among. Us. 7. Bad Seats You decided to go to the premiere which you knew was stupid but also extremely fun at the same time. You've waited in line to get a ticket for twenty minutes and you still arrive in the theater a half hour before they even begin previews. Yet, the theater is packed. Of course there's plenty of single seats scattered throughout but no one is kind enough to scoot down one. So you and your friends have to go to the front section which might as well be labeled as IMAX seats because you have to look up the entire time. Bad seats ruin movie theaters. You can't be too close but too far away. Railings are a gift from God. Also, don't steal my cupholder. 8. That random guy that screams right before something jumps out... I HATE YOU. 9. People Who Talk Is it really necessary to talk about what happened during your day while the movie is playing? NO. There's this really cool concept called going to dinner AND a movie, emphasizing on the dinner part here. Save conversations for everywhere outside of the four walls that make up the movie theater. Also, stop giving a play by play. You don't need to give your opinion or ask questions DURING the movie. You can do that all after; I promise it won't kill you. 10. Cell Phones Putting your phone to the lowest brightness does not make you a secret ninja. Turn it off.
How to Make Katsu Curry (カツカレー), Japan's Cutlet & Curry Dish (Vegan Option)
Every so often, this is one of those plates I get a serious craving for. I always think that katsu cutlets tend to be a little too dry and that simple curry rice plates are a little bit boring, so when I'm able to order them together, I get really excited. They really balance each other out! Traditionally, katsu curry is made with chicken, beef, or pork, but you can customize this however you would want. For example, I have seen people sub the meat out for thick breaded cuts of eggplant or Portobello mushroom for an equally satisfying vegetarian dish. Katsu Curry (Makes 4 servings) INGREDIENTS: To Make the Katsu (Meat Version) - 4 pork loin chops, chicken breast, or thin steaks (about 1" thick, no bones) Salt & pepper, to taste 1/2 cup flour 1 - 2 eggs 1 cup panko or bread crumbs Oil for deep frying To Make the Katsu (Vegan/Vegetarian Version) - 4 1" thick slices of eggplant, 4 portobello caps, or 4 store-bought seitan-based cutlets (I would recommend trying Gardein's Chick'n Scallopini - thawed - for this dish.) Salt & pepper, to taste 1/2 cup flour 1 - 2 egg replacements (Ener-G Egg Replacer woould be good for this recipe.) 1 cup panko or bread crumbs Oil for frying To Make the Curry - 2 yellow onions 2 carrots 3 potatoes 1 tablespoons oil 3 1/2 cups water 1 box curry sauce mix (approximately 4 ounces) 4 cups of cooked white rice DIRECTIONS: 1) To make the katsu, make small cuts all over your cutlet of choice with tip of knife. Sprinkle salt and pepper on both sides. Coat it with flour, dip in eggs (or egg replacement), then cover with bread crumbs. 2) Heat deep frying oil to 350 F, and deep fry crumb-covered cutlet. (You can check the temperature by dropping a bread crumb. If it comes up to the oil surface right after it's dropped, it's good.) 3) Fry until color turns golden brown and cutlet floats in the oil, about 5-8 minutes, turning once or twice. Set the meat on a cooling rack for a minute. Cut into 5-6 pieces. 4) To make the curry, cut vegetables into bite size pieces. Heat oil and fry onions for 8 minutes. Add carrots and potatoes. Add water to the pot. After it boils, remove from heat and add curry sauce mix. Stir well so the pieces of the mix dissolve. Let it simmer for 10 - 15 minutes (cook longer if you'd like it thicker). If you'd like to add the optional curry powder, stir it in just before serving. 5) Put about a cup of rice on each plate, then place a katsu over the rice. Finally, generously pour curry over it. Serve while still warm.
The True Lives Of First Generation Kids
I've been wanting to write a card about this for a while because I feel like this is a really unique experience that, at the same time, a lot of people can relate to. My mom was born in the Middle East, raised in Mexico, and moved to New York City when she was a young girl. Because of this, she had a really different way of raising us than maybe the 'normal' American parent would, and I don't think I really understood why I felt so weird and different growing up until I could look back at the whole experience and realize - hey, I'm a first generation. My favorite show on television right now is 'Fresh Off The Boat', a loosely biographical comedy based on the life of celebrity restaurateur Eddie Huang and his childhood as a first generation Taiwanese American. The Huangs might be from Taiwan, but I feel like the things they experience and the way that they handle situations are so reminiscent of anyone who comes from a similar family situation. Inspired by that show, and facets of my own life, I figured I'd put together a list of ABSOLUTELY TRUE (AND TRULY HILARIOUS) experiences first-generation kids deal with when growing up. Granted, many of these are my own experiences and might not be true for all first generation kids. However, I hope you all get a laugh! Your grandparents don't speak English - and taught you all the best insults in the language they DO speak. Okay, maybe Teta (aka 'Grandma') didn't want me to know how to call people sloppy, dumb, and fat in Arabic, but she talked so much Middle Eastern smack that those are some of the only words I know. You never get to eat the cafeteria lunch - just whatever was left over from last night's dinner. There's nothing quite like trying to explain to the other kids at the table what falafel is. (Not many 4th graders have come across it before, and don't realize that they'll be devouring them by the dozen when they become the 'trendy' foreign food 15 years later.) You have so many cousins that family photos require the panorama feature. So you've got your first cousins, your second cousins, your third cousins once removed, the cousin who is a cousin of your other cousin (which also makes you cousins, according to your mom), and the cousins who aren't actually cousins but are so close to your family they're treated just the same. Your mom isn't saying you have to marry someone of the same background, but she isn't NOT saying that. Just like she's not telling you that your wedding ceremony has to be in your family's church/mosque/temple/religious center of choice and that you must give her lots of small, chubby, adorable grandbabies. You have to warn your non-ethnic friends about your family before they show up to a party. Take your shoes off, sample the hummus, and I apologize in advance that no one on my mom's side knows how to pronounce the 't' in 'Courtney'. (You guys, my uncles paid for a bellydancer to show up to our Fathers' Day party one year. I cannot make this up.) You have an uncle that pushes alcohol on everyone even though half of your cousins are still in high school. Here's looking at you, Uncle Alfif. (Or as we say in my family - Alcoholic Al.) And your parents aren't really fans of the fact you never tried learning 'the language'. Why do I need to learn how to speak a language I'm only going to be able to use when I'm talking to old people at family functions? I already learned all the good words from my bilingual cousins anyway. Are you a first generation American kid who has their own stories? Let me know in the comments below!