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What A Coke Does To Your Body In 1 Hour
I'll be the first to admit that I love Coca Cola. But it's absolutely horrible for us. A very detailed infographic supplied by TheRenegadePharmacist.com has officially proven again how bad Coke is for your body (WE KNOW). The American CDC has said that 25% of Americans drink soda on a regular basis which is a hefty reason why obesity has run rampant. Sugar is the main culprit since an average can of soda can contain 3 tablespoons of sugar and 4 tablespoons if in a 12-ounce-bottle. Coke is one of the most popular soft drinks in the United States with a massive marketing empire so there will never be a day where we won't see it somewhere. But there comes a time where you need to take a moment and see what you're putting into your body. Let's take a look : All it takes is ONE Coke : First 10 Minutes : 10 teaspoon of sugar hit your system. (100% of your recommended daily intake.) You don't immediately vomit from the overwhelming sweetness because phosphoric acid cuts the flavor allowing you to keep it down. In 20 Minutes : Your blood sugar spikes, causing an insulin burst. Your live responds to this by turning any sugar it can get its hands on into fat. (There's plenty of that at this particular moment.) In 40 Minutes : Caffeine absorption is complete. Your pupils dilate, your blood pressure rises, as a response your liver dumps more sugar into your bloodstream. The adenosine receptors in your brain are now blocked preventing drowsiness. In 45 Minutes : Your body ups your dopamine production stimulating the pleasure centers of your brain. This is physically the same way heroin works, by the way. In 60 Minutes : The phosphoric acid binds calcium, magnesium, and zinc in your lower intestine providing a further boost in metabolism. This is a compounded by high doses of sugar and artificial sweeteners also increasing the urinary excretion of calcium. After 60 Minutes : The caffeine's diuretic properties come into play. (It makes you have to pee.) It is now assured that you'll evacuate the bonded calcium, magnesium, and zinc that was headed to your bones as well as sodium, electrolyte and water. As the rave inside of you died down you'll start to have a sugar crash. You may become irritable and/or sluggish. You've also now, literally, pissed away all the water that was in theCoke. But not before infusing it with valuable nutrients your body could have used for things like having the ability to hydrate your system of build strong bones and teeth. Why you should care? - Coke weakens bones and teeth. - Increases your chance for getting diabetes. - It slows your metabolism, especially long term. - Aspartame in the soda leads to disease and organ irritation. - Coke has negative affects on fertility. - It leads to weight gain. - Can worsen asthma or increase risk for heart disease. - Cancer, Osteoporosis, and Kidney issues are common in people who drink soda. - It's expensive to continually buy it. - Diet sodas are a scam and false advertising. All soda is bad for you. - No nutritional value. - Raised cholesterol and specifically increased belly fat. Do I need to say more? Coke or soda for that matter is never a good idea. (But don't worry, I still love it.)
Remember the French Press?
I have been travelling lately for work. I was in Hamburg for a few months and I shared an apartment with a roommate. To my absolute delight, when I first arrived in Hamburg I discovered that my roommate had a decent coffee maker in the kitchen. I am a light traveller and I hadn't even packed light coffee gear such as an Aeropress. I had planned to sort out my coffee situation when I was settled in and so I was over the moon when I realized that I didn't need to. To my utter dismay, my roommate moved out after a month or two, taking her coffee maker with her. "Oh", I heard myself say when I saw her packing up the coffee machine, "I forgot you would be taking that with you. Now I have to think of a new way of brewing coffee in the morning!" "What about that French Press?" she replied. What? The dusty old appliance I had all but forgotten the name of, it had been so long since I used one, was sitting on a shelf, unnoticed. I had almost completly forgotten that French Press brewing is a totally legitimate way of making coffee. In fact, several coffee shops where I used to work actually used to serve French Press coffee as their only hand brewed coffee option, and it was delicious. https://coffee-brewing-methods.com/how-to-use-a-french-press-coffee-maker/ So what was my problem with the French Press? The main memories I have of the French Press (known as a Cafetière in my neck of the woods) are from my parent's home, where they would brew a pot of French press coffee every morning that was thick as mud and and intensely caffeinated. I also remember a friend of mine telling me knowingly that you are supposed to add an extra spoon of ground coffee for every person who is partaking in said coffee drinking experience. Needless to say, the French Press wasn't associated with artisan, speciality coffee when I was growing up. In fact, the French Press is an amazing, unique and extremely affordable way of brewing extremely delicious coffee in your home, if you apply the same principles of coffee brewing that are used for other types of coffee preparation such as pourover or espresso brewing. French Press coffee has wonderful tasting notes that are impossible to extract with other methods of coffee making. Due to the lack of a fine filter and the extended time that the ground coffee has with the water, the French Press yields rich, full and complex flavors. This type of coffee contains compounds from the coffee oils such as cafestol and kawehol that are absent from drip coffee but which totally change the taste and coffee drinking experience. These compounds have also been shown to be anti-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic and to have many other health benefits. So why was the French Press coffee I grew up with so variable? Well, the catch is that French Press brewing requires the same care and attention that other coffee brewing methods do, using freshly ground coffee ground to the appropriate course grind for French Press, an appropriate ratio of coffee to water, correct water temperature and a monitored brewing time. After my roommate left I started using the French Press every day and experimenting with recipes and different beans. I experienced a complete French Press renaissance and still find myself completely obsessed with it, long after I have moved on from Hamburg and regained access to my coffee gear at home. So here is my coffee challenge for the day: I am willing to bet that most people have a French Press lying around the house somewhere. Dust that bad boy off and rediscover its wonders. If you have never experienced the taste sensations of well brewed and properly extracted French Press coffee, you are in for a treat!