onewoppa
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makeup of the day^^

havent done one of this in a while butt here it is lol its just a simple eyeliner kind of day ! hope you enjoy it^^
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What kind of eyeliner are you using?
im using the Maybelline Master Duo in color 500 Black Lacquer @AlohaJPark@AlohaJPark
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Lasers Vs Chemical Peels - What's Best For Your Skin?
Scarring from acne? Fine lines and wrinkles? Pigmentation and sun spots? Is any of this ringing a bell? They do happen, regrettably, and when they do, we panic. We've looked everywhere, from skincare products that claim to remove age spots to lengthy Google searches, expecting to find the 'magic' treatment that can eradicate the skin's textural imperfections and beyond. Fortunately, there are alternatives. Chemical peels and laser treatments, two skin resurfacing techniques that remove damaged skin to encourage skin regeneration, are used. What is the final outcome? Smoother and more rejuvenated skin. Combating skin problems has never been easier, but if you're new to the world of skin resurfacing, it might be intimidating. What Is the Difference Between Chemical Peels and Laser Treatments? Skin resurfacing techniques such as chemical peels and laser treatments remove old skin to promote the formation of new skin. Both procedures are frequently used to treat acne scars and hyperpigmentation, fine lines and wrinkles, and sun exposure issues such as pigmentation spots. Chemical peels and laser treatments are distinguished by the procedure itself. The first, as the name implies, employs chemical treatments to remove damaged skin, whilst the second employs lasers. Chemical peels use different amounts of acid solutions to treat the skin's outer layer. There are three types of peels: superficial, medium, and deep. Superficial chemical peels (for example, VI Peel and lactic acid peels) are delicate and exfoliate the skin lightly with weak acids. Medium chemical peels (for example, glycolic acid peels and TCA peels) are more invasive and penetrate the middle and outer layers of the skin. Deep chemical peels (e.g., phenol acid peels) are the most potent, employing strong acids to penetrate as well as remove damaged skin cells. Laser resurfacing treatments use light beams to penetrate the skin, eliminating one column at a time. Although laser removal is more exact, it is often more expensive than chemical peels. There are two types of lasers: ablative and non-ablative. Ablative lasers (such as CO2 and erbium) offer the best effects by vaporizing the skin. Non-ablative lasers (for example, Fraxel) are less intrusive to the skin because they heat it rather than destroying it. Because non-ablative lasers are less strong than ablative lasers, numerous sessions may be required to achieve the optimum results. While chemical peels and laser treatments are distinct in their advantages and the concerns they address, there is some overlap in the issues they address. A strong TCA (trichloroacetic acid) chemical peel, for example, can give resurfacing comparable to that of a resurfacing laser, or both peels and lasers can be utilized to treat acne and acne scars. In terms of skin tone, the two surgeries are also dissimilar. Chemical peels assist those with darker skin tones the most because they are an excellent pigmentation treatment. People with dark skin tones are more prone to hyperpigmentation concerns such as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation due to an overabundance of melanin in their skin (PIH). Acid solutions are used in chemical peels to encourage collagen formation, and antioxidants are used to further penetrate and treat pigmentation in darker skin. What Are the Most Common Chemical Peel Types? Vi Peel The VI Peel is a painless, mild peel that is appropriate for all skin types and tones. It is made up of trichloroacetic acid, Retin-A, salicylic acid, phenol, and vitamin C and is widely used to treat hyperpigmentation and repair UV damage. Lactic peel A lactic peel is made from milk and is ideal for dry or sensitive skin. It balances the pH of the skin and exfoliates gently by dissolving dead skin cells. Glycolic peel Glycolic acid, which is used in glycolic peels, stimulates the synthesis of new collagen and elastin by targeting the skin's outer layer. It is frequently used to treat acne, acne scars, and to tighten pores. TCA peel A TCA peel, which is more harsh than a glycolic peel, contains trichloroacetic acid. It is commonly used to lighten skin pigmentation and smooth wrinkles. Phenol peel To address severe wrinkles and discolouration, a phenol peel penetrates the skin thoroughly. When compared to gentler peels, it typically necessitates a lengthy recovery period and may be unpleasant. What Are the Most Frequently Used Laser Treatments? Fraxel Laser Treatment The Fraxel Laser Treatment uses FDA-approved fractional laser technology to revitalize skin. This laser is best effective on acne scars and tiny wrinkles that are mild to moderate in severity. CO2 Laser Treatment The CO2 Laser Treatment uses pixelated carbon dioxide lasers to treat more severe skin issues like deep wrinkles and acne scars. In general, this laser is unsuccessful for treating skin redness. Erbium Laser The Erbium laser is a less invasive and gentler laser treatment than the CO2 laser. The laser increases collagen formation by penetrating the epidermis (the outer skin layer). It's commonly used to remove wrinkles, fine lines, and age spots. Which Of These Is the Best Skin Care Treatment? It all boils down to your skin type and concerns, in a nutshell. It can be difficult to determine the best course of action, therefore it is always advisable to visit with a dermatologist to discuss your concerns and treatment choices. Not all chemical peels and laser procedures are suited for people with darker skin tones. Are you unsure about your situation? When in doubt, always consult a dermatologist. THE MOST EFFECTIVE ACNE SCAR TREATMENT A chemical peel used to treat hyperpigmentation. Textural changes, such as atrophic or indented scars, respond better to laser skin treatments. A TCA chemical peel, on the other hand, can help with acne scars. Combination methods, which include laser, peels, subcision, and/or dermal fillers, are widely used. WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT IF THIS IS MY FIRST CHEMICAL PEEL/LASER TREATMENT? With chemical peels, expect some redness and peeling following, depending on the type of peel. Not every peel results in apparent peeling. Post-laser skin side effects may include redness, peeling, swelling, and bruising, depending on the laser used. If you use topical treatments, you should discontinue them a few days before the procedure. You may be advised to stop using retinoids, hydroxy acids, benzoyl peroxide, or other harsh, drying, and potentially irritating substances depending on the peel and laser. As a preventative step, patients with a history of cold sores may be given antiviral drugs. WILL A CHEMICAL PEEL OR A LASER TREATMENT BE APPROPRIATE FOR MY SKIN? If you have any of the following conditions, you should avoid chemical peels and laser treatments: - Active infections in the treatment regions - Will be exposed to sunlight after treatment - Have a history of keloids or hypertrophic scars. - A lack of enough post-treatment recuperation time. - Have a darker skin tone (this applies to certain types of chemical peels and laser resurfacing treatments). Whether you choose a chemical peel or a laser treatment, there is a resurfacing skin option for you!
6 Easy Ways To A Smooth Neck
Because the skin on your neck is some of the thinnest on your body, it is also one of the first places to show signs of ageing. Here are six ways to make your neck look younger and address everything from sun damage to sagging on this delicate area. 1. WEAR SUNSCREEN EVERY SINGLE DAY. Your dermatologist will agree that a nickel-sized amount of sunscreen applied to your neck and chest every day will help prevent collagen breakdown and the formation of sunspots. Don't forget to massage the sides and back of your neck. 2. MAINTAIN YOUR SKIN'S MOISTURIZATION. Again, the skin on your neck is thinner and has fewer oil glands than the rest of your body, so keeping the area hydrated is essential for a smoother overall texture. Look for peptide-containing creams (which can help stimulate new collagen growth) and apply them in gentle, upward strokes from your chest to your jawline. 3. RECLAIM YOUR BEAUTY SLEEP. Do you always wake up with pillow lines on the side of your neck? Apply one of these silicone patches before going to bed to keep your skin from crinkling while you sleep. You'll wake up with a smoother neck and less chance of further damage. 4. FOCUS ON CORRECT POSTURE. The amount of time we spend looking down at our phones and screens has resulted in what we now refer to as "tech neck." The simplest solution would be to limit screen time entirely, but more realistically, you should keep everything as close to eye level as possible to avoid unnecessary wrinkling. 5. GIVE LASER TREATMENTS A GO AHEAD. Still have fine lines on your neck? Fraxel lasers, stimulate your body's natural repair process to promote collagen growth. Fraxel can also be used to treat any dark spots or broken capillaries in the area, giving you a more even complexion. 6. ULTRASOUND TREATMENT FOR SERIOUS REPAIR. Ultherapy or Ultracel is your best non-surgical option for deeper, more stubborn lines and sagging. The FDA-approved treatment uses heat generated by focused sonic waves to penetrate deeper into the skin and stimulate the production of new collagen. Take note that the effect is gradual, and most patients notice a lifting effect three to six months after the initial treatment, so be patient.
Why And How To Use A Niacinamide Serum
Niacinamide may not get as much attention as retinol and vitamin C, but it is a skincare powerhouse that deserves equal recognition. It is the definition of a multitasker, offering a host of distinct benefits that make it a good choice for a wide range of skin types and complexion issues. However, incorporating it into your current skincare routine might sound difficult. Is it OK to use niacinamide along with vitamin C and/or retinol? Is hyaluronic acid a viable alternative? We weigh in on everything you need to know about using niacinamide. What is niacinamide, exactly? Simply put, it's a B vitamin, one of two forms of vitamin B3, and it participates in a number of critical cellular operations in the skin. What benefits does it have for the skin? Buckle your seatbelts, because this is going to be a long list. Niacinamide is a fantastic treatment for acne-prone skin. Niacinamide reduces sebum production, which can help prevent acne and shine. The vitamin is also known for its anti-inflammatory qualities, which aid in the treatment of acne and other skin conditions such as eczema. Niacinamide helps to build the skin barrier, which is advantageous to people who have eczema or sensitive skin. It is also an efficient skin lightening agent, treating hyperpigmentation by blocking pigment transfer from pigment-producing cells known as melanocytes to skin cells on the surface where discoloration is visible. As if that wasn't enough, there's evidence that niacinamide can help to reduce wrinkling and photoaging by maintaining cell function and repairing DNA damage. To summarise, niacinamide has very few limitations. Is it OK to mix niacinamde and retinol? Yes! In fact, retinol and niacinamide are recommended together for faster effects. The soothing characteristics of niacinamide can also assist to alleviate the unpleasant side effects and irritation that usually accompany retinol's wrinkle-fighting effectiveness. Is it safe to combine with other ingredients? Yes, as a general rule, which is why it's found in many skincare products and is easy to incorporate into your present routine. Niacinamide is frequently coupled with salicylic acid, a beta-hydroxy acid typically found in acne products, due to its acne-fighting qualities. Combining niacinimadie's oil-removal properties with salicylic acid's ability to break down excess oil is an effective way to keep pores free and breakouts at bay. Niacinamide is an ideal choice for combining with alpha-hydroxy acids, which are chemical exfoliants that can cause skin irritation, due to its anti-inflammatory and skin barrier-strengthening effects. Because the AHAs exfoliate the dead skin cells that would otherwise make it impossible for the niacinamide to enter, combining them boosts the efficacy of the niacinamide. Finally, because niacinamide and hyaluronic acid can both help with dry skin, they are frequently mixed. What is the one thing that the jury is still out on? Vitamin C. Because vitamin C might inactivate niacinamide, the applications should be separated by 15 minutes. In truth, the two would have to be heated in order to interact negatively, and more and more cosmetics are combining the two in skin-brightening formulations. The bottom conclusion is that if you utilise a product that contains both vitamin C and niacinamide, it was most likely specifically designed to work together. If you're using two different products that include these chemicals, wait 15 minutes between applications or use one in the morning and the other in the evening. Should I use niacinamide? Sure, in a nutshell. One of the nicest aspects of niacinamide is not only the vast list of benefits it offers, but also how well it is tolerated, particularly by those with sensitive skin. This makes it an enticing choice for those whose skin is sensitive to more common acne or skin lightening agents like benzoyl peroxide or retinoids.
3 Cosmetic Treatments that Celebrities Love
Hollywood stars look picture perfect on the Red Carpet. They work hard to achieve that uber-glam look by having a healthy diet and fitness routine. But every now and then, they do get a little help from their dermatologist to refresh their timeless look. Here are the top 3 treatments that celebrities indulge in... Botox Botox is used to achieve a tight and shiny forehead, lift-up eyebrows that droop with age and get rid of the creases that occur on the outer corner of your eyes when you smile. Almost every celebrity facing the camera gets Botox at some time in their life. When this treatment is done in the correct way, with low doses, the face looks ageless. But when the dose is too much or wrongly placed, then our celebrities end up looking more botched up than beautiful! Lip Fillers Celebrities have lip fillers for two reasons. The young ones may feel insecure about thin lips and want to plump up their pout. While the older ones lose lip volume as they age and also develop whistler's lines or smoker's lines. Lip fillers are like art, or sculpture. Your dermatologist is responsible for creating a beautiful shape that looks natural and complements your facial proportions. Badly done lips are called a 'trout pout' or 'duck-bill lips' and there's nothing appealing about them. Skin Tightening Everyone of us including celebrities use anti-aging creams. But that isn't the true reason behind their tight skin. Celebrities indulge in skin tightening treatment such as Thermage, Ultherapy and Fraxel once a year. These are usually done when they are on vacation, to hide the down time. These skin tightening treatments can reverse several years of skin aging with just a single treatment session. The result is a lifted, firm and rejuvenated skin. If you wish to glam up your look consider speaking to your dermatologist about these treatment options.
Jewelry In Candles Rings | Best Jewelry Candles Coupon
Rainy days and scented candles. These specific candles are hand poured in upcycled containers. We found these while visiting a local unrivaled shop and we fell in love instantly. They are poured to order with your chosen scent and soy wax, and dispatched within 3 working days. We recommend that you let them cure for 2 weeks before actually lighting them. Net weight is about 400 grams and they come at a bargain price. Burning time is more that 50 hours if the burning instructions are respected. As the holiday season is in full swing, the pressures of finding the perfect present for each of your loved ones can be quite stressful. People often worry how they will find the perfect gift for everyone in their family, and when it comes to gifts for people in your close circle of friends, it can be even harder! Finding the perfect gift for someone with an interest in jewelry can be difficult with so many options, but at Simpatico Jewelry, we have the perfect solution. Our jewelry candles are the perfect solution for anyone who loves jewelry and enjoys fragrances. They are the perfect option for someone who is already well stocked on fragrances and is looking for something new to light up their nightstand. Jewelry candles are a pretty unique type of candle. They are made to smell like the scent of the jewelry that you would buy for a girl friend or someone else who loves jewelry. This type of candle is great for someone who loves jewelry and watches whatever they are wearing because the smell is beautiful. It also make it easy for them to smell what they are wearing instead of having to smell it in the mirror. This type of candle is great for someone who has a large selection of jewelry and wants to find a way to keep it in good condition. These candles give off a very positive and pleasant smell and the person who is getting it will love it. Luxury candles are a great gift for any special occasion or holiday. They can also be a great gift for yourself! The right candle can really set the mood and is one gift that will be used all year long. This unrivaled candles will help you find the perfect luxury candle for your gift or yourself!
3 Lifestyle Habits that can Cause Acne Breakouts
Your acne is coded in your genes and governed by your hormones. While these two factors are not in your control, your lifestyle which affects your skin equally, IS. Here are the most important lifestyle changes that you can make to reduce your acne breakouts... 1. Clean your mobile phone Your mobile phone is pressed against your cheeks while you chat away with friends. The bacteria from your skin gets transferred on to the screen and stays there till it gets pressed on your skin again. Besides this your phone may have food residue from the time that you were eating and texting and dust from lying on dirty surfaces. If you have acne prone skin, make sure you sanitize the surface of your mobile phone at least once every day. 2. Wash your face less often If you have oily skin which is prone to breakouts, chances are that you are washing your face more than twice daily. That, coupled with acne treatment AHA toners, salicylic acid serums and retinol night creams can over dry your skin. This leads your skin to produce even more oil which in turn feeds acne causing bacteria. Wash your face maximum 3 times a day. Once in the morning when you wake up and shower, once before sleeping at night and an additional time after a workout or outdoor exposure. 3. Reduce your carb intake Refined carbs such as bread, pasta and fried food have a high glycemic index. They increase blood sugar and cause a spike in the hormone Insulin. High glycemic foods are very inflammatory for the body and also disturb your gut bacteria. This in turn disturbs your skin microbiome. Increase your intake of fresh vegetables and salads instead. These are loaded with antioxidants which help your skin in healing faster. If you have been struggling with acne breakouts for a while, getting a little help from your dermatologist could go a long way in getting rid of your acne.
The Truth About Hormonal Acne And How To Control It
Indian women's hormonal environments have changed dramatically as a result of increased stress and poor lifestyle choices. When it comes to polycystic ovaries, the condition is a hereditary one that can be passed down from mother to daughter. A hormonal imbalance known as PCOS or PCOD has become more common among women and young girls as obesity has become more common. Despite the fact that PCOD is a gynaecological condition marked by irregular menstruation, it is most commonly diagnosed when patients visit a dermatologist for persistent acne, hirsutism, or hair loss. So, as a dermatologist, when do I suspect PCOS or hormonal acne? Suspicion usually arises during a consultation when one or more of the following factors are present: * Inflammatory acne exacerbated by premenstrual hormones. * Acne predominantly on the lower half of their face, the jawline, and upper neck. * Hair loss and/or hirsutism are also present. * Intense acne brought on by menstrual irregularities or PCOS. Acne that does not respond to conventional acne treatments like topicals, antibiotics, or chemical peels is likely hormonal acne if none of the above factors can be ruled out. Is it possible for a dermatologist to tell whether or not acne is caused by hormones? It's a little complicated here. It is suggested that you undergo a series of blood tests. A clear hormonal imbalance may be discovered, or the results may be within normal ranges. While normal test results don't exclude PCOD as a possibility, the ratios of different investigations are taken into account when making this determination. The clinical diagnosis may be correct even if laboratory tests are negative! When do you have your hormonal tests? The use of anti-androgen medications is usually not recommended during the first consultation if the clinical diagnosis of hormonal acne is clear. Conventional acne treatment is started and response is tracked. Investigations may not be required if the response is adequate. After 6-8 weeks of treatment, if the patient does not improve, hormonal testing may be recommended. Is it necessary to treat hormonal acne and PCOS acne with hormones in all cases? No, that's not always the case. Patients who need a quick response and are open to hormonal treatment begin taking the medication at the beginning of their acne treatment. Patients who don't want to take hormones are prescribed antibiotics/retinoids, including topical and oral forms, as well as chemical peels. To effectively control mild to moderate hormonal acne, I typically use advanced chemical peels such as Agera, Obagi Blue peel Radiance, and Azelan. The patient is encouraged to start taking medication if his or her response does not improve after 3-4 sessions. Patients who do not see improvement after 6-8 sessions are re-explained that oral anti-androgen medication is needed to control acne. Acne is a completely curable dermatology lifestyle disorder. Non-hormonal acne takes 1-2 months to treat, while hormonal acne takes 3-6 months. Hormonal acne requires a more stringent maintenance plan as well. This may comprise of customised skin care as well as ocassional chemical peels. You should find yourself a dependable dermatologist and start a long-term relationship.
What Causes Strawberry Legs And How To Get Rid Of It?
Summer is arrived, which means you're most likely showing a little more skin. As our gams finally receive their due, pants become shorts, maxi dresses become minis, and skirts become minis. Short hemlines, on the other hand, may be undesirable to those whose legs are spotted, bumpy, or spotty. Let's learn more about how a dermatologist treats and prevents skin diseases known as "strawberry legs." What Are 'Strawberry Legs,' Exactly? Strawberry legs refers to a dotty appearance of the legs, mainly around the hair follicles. The dots depict the buildup of common skin elements in and around the hair and oil glands. Keratin is a type of protein that is found in (the main protein in the skin) * Melanin is a pigment found in the skin (the source of pigment) * Sebum is a type of oil that is produced by (natural oil of the skin) * Bacteria are microorganisms (often, normal skin flora) The name "strawberry legs" refers to the dark pores and dots or red pimples that emerge on the lower thighs and resemble strawberry seeds. Strawberry legs are not hazardous in terms of health, but they are ugly. Strawberry Legs: What Causes Them and How to Treat Them While the appearance of strawberry legs is typically the same no matter what caused it, there are a number of causes. Knowing what's causing your dotted gams can allow you to address the appropriate ailment. The four most prevalent causes of strawberry legs, as well as how to cure them, are listed below. 1. Clogged Pores Clogged pores on your legs are just as common as clogged pores on your face. Because of heredity and thicker body hair, some people have larger pores, and while the pores themselves aren't inherently irritating, they can become problematic when they become blocked with germs, dead skin, and sebum. When clogged pores on the legs are exposed to air, the debris dries up and darkens, in the same way that a blackhead on the face does. Treat with: Chemical and physical exfoliation. Exfoliation, which is part of your facial skincare routine, can be used to cure congested pores on the legs or anyplace else on the body. My personal favourite for my patients is chemical exfoliation, which uses chemicals such as acids and retinols to stimulate skin cell turnover and clear pores. This eliminates keratin, oils, and other skin detritus gently, opening up pores and follicles and preventing secondary bacterial buildup. Acne and folliculitis bacteria grow in oil-clogged hair follicles, so eliminating that build-up is critical. Look for a body wash or moisturiser that contains alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs) and beta-hydroxy acids (BHAs), notably glycolic acid and salicylic acid, to exfoliate dead skin cells and other debris that create clogged pores. These acids gently exfoliate the skin by minimising the'stickiness' of dead or dying skin cells. This helps to open up the pores while also giving the skin a great textural shift and radiance. 2. Folliculitis Folliculitis is a skin disorder that causes inflamed or infected hair follicles. The most common sign is little red pimples around the hair follicles. Hair loss or scarring in the affected area may occur in extreme situations. The majority of instances, however, are small and normally resolve within a few days. It's crucial to note that folliculitis is a catch-all term for inflammation of the hair follicle. This can be contagious due to microorganisms like staphylococcus or sterile due to oil buildup or shaving stress. Treat with: Antibiotics, both oral and topical. Folliculitis is a "tricky condition" to treat, which is why you should consult a dermatologist before trying any at-home therapies. Folliculitis can be sterile, with red, pus-filled pimples forming as a result of causes like clogged pores and shaving. They can, however, indicate a superficial skin infection caused by bacteria or yeast such as staph and pityrosporum. While the former can be treated with over-the-counter medications, the latter may require prescriptions for antibiotic creams or even pills to resolve. A simple swab can be used by a dermatologist to assess whether or not organisms should be targeted. If there are, it might save you a lot of time and effort in developing successful at-home habits. Treat with: Antibacterial skincare. At-home treatments range from lifestyle changes to skincare. To begin, change out of your sweaty training clothes and shower as quickly as possible. In the shower, lather up with antibacterial soap. Treat with: Laser hair removal treatment. You should also reconsider your shaving routine. Use a soothing shave cream in addition to converting from a multi-bladed razor to a disposable razor. In return for less rough skin, the closest shave is compromised. The risk of folliculitis is inversely associated to a close shave. He also suggests shaving with the grain rather than against it every two to three shaves. If you're prone to razor bumps, laser hair removal with a dermatologist will save you a lot of time and aggravation in the long run. 3. Keratosis Pilaris Keratosis pilaris (KP), popularly known as "chicken skin," is a skin disorder characterised by the appearance of small bumps on the skin. Keratosis pilaris most usually affects the upper outer arms, however it can also affect the thighs. Keratin accumulation in the hair follicles causes this. Treat with: Chemical exfoliation. Chemical exfoliants, like clogged pores, are frequently efficient in the treatment of keratosis pilaris, but prescription-strength treatments may also be beneficial. Exfoliative acids are my first line of defence against keratosis pilaris. If those don't work, a prescription-grade retinoid may be an option, but only after consulting with a dermatologist. While keratosis pilaris is usually a year-round condition, flare-ups are more likely in the winter when the skin is drier. Additionally, swimmers may aggravate the illness due to the dehydrating effects of chlorine and other pool chemicals. 4. Dry Skin Dry skin, as previously indicated, contributes to a number of skin diseases, including strawberry legs. Dehydrated skin is more susceptible to irritation, especially during shaving. Dry skin on the lower legs is more prone to razor burn, keratosis pilaris, folliculitis, and plugged pores, all of which can result in a spotty appearance. Treat with: Creams and moisturisers. For severely dry skin, a daily moisturising body lotion containing ammonium lactate is an excellent place to start, especially if it is scaly. Ichthyosis, or dry, scaly, or thickened skin, may not usually respond to regular creams and moisturisers, thus a dual-purpose formulation may be necessary. Because there is a thicker layer of dead skin on the surface, moisturising alone isn't always adequate. Exfoliating lotions gradually remove that layer, allowing richer moisturisers to penetrate deeper into the healthier layers beneath. In conclusion Strawberry legs are a catch-all name for a range of skin disorders, but there are a few things you can do at home and at the workplace to cure and prevent a bumpy or spotty appearance. Consult a board-certified dermatologist before attempting to treat yourself to ensure you understand the underlying cause of your illness.