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Wisdom From The Buddha

Before renouncing worldly life in pursuit of the truth, the Buddha was a wealthy prince inundated by all the luxuries that money and power could afford. In this age of rampant materialism, where confusion and suffering are widespread, the Buddha's decision to renounce his life of riches to find deeper meaning in life is more relevant than ever before.
Through deep meditation, thought and self-reflection, the Buddha unlocked several secrets about life secrets that are timeless and universal in nature. Here are seven Buddha quotes full of wisdom -
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Awesome thoughts from Buddha, you're right. The first image is really small for me to see though :(
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